Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200400004
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic and responses to it have contributed to, and probably accelerated, the roles that the internet and digital technologies play in our lives, thrusting large numbers of people and organizations online. But internet and digital skills vary and not everyone had the same capacity to rapidly shift activities of daily life online. The objective of this paper is to document the changes in the online activities and skills reported by Canadians prior to, and during, the COVID-19 pandemic. Data from 2018 and 2020 Canadian Internet Use Surveys are used to categorize Canadians into one of five internet user groups, ranging from non-users to advanced users.

    Release date: 2022-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200300006
    Description:

    This study presents a socio-demographic profile of children aged 0 to 14 years with affirmative responses to the DSQ filter questions on the 2016 Census. More specifically, the study examined the distributions of activity limitations by children’s age, sex, and family socioeconomic characteristics. The consistency of this profile with well-established patterns of child disability from the existing literature is discussed, and recommendations are made for research to further assess the suitability of the DSQ filter questions for generating an appropriate sampling frame for prospective child disability surveys.

    Release date: 2022-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2021008
    Description:

    A robust Internet typology is essential for monitoring how individuals are responding to the digital transformation and for assessing the divide between digital ‘haves’ and ‘have nots.’ Individuals’ capacities to use the Internet and digital technologies are an important aspect of this digital divide. Using data from the 2018 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS), this study presents an Internet-use typology that is based on the range and complexity of online activities and digital skills that Canadians report they perform. Five Internet-user groups are identified.

    Release date: 2021-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202101000003
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2017 Canadian Survey on Disability to examine differences in educational experiences between women and men aged 15 to 34 with a disability. These experiences capture the difficulties that persons with disabilities reported encountering in school, such as limitations on learning, social exclusion, and a lack of accommodations.

    Release date: 2021-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202101000004
    Description:

    This study used data from the 2017 Canadian Survey on Disability to examine differences in work experiences between women and men aged 20 to 54 with a disability. These experiences capture the barriers that persons with disabilities reported encountering in their jobs, workplaces, and the labour market.

    Release date: 2021-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100300004
    Description:

    This study uses the 2018 Canadian Internet Use Survey to examine reports of the negative effects individuals aged 15 to 64 experience because of their use of social networking websites or apps. Social media refers to digital platforms that allow users to create and share content (e.g., text-based posts, photos and videos) and online profiles, and to interact with other users. In 2018, social media was regularly used by about 9 in 10 Canadians aged 15 to 34, 8 in 10 of those aged 35 to 49, and 6 in 10 of those aged 50 to 64.

    Release date: 2021-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2021003
    Description:

    Canada continues to experience an opioid crisis. While there is solid information on the demographic and geographic characteristics of people experiencing fatal and non-fatal opioid overdoses in Canada, there is limited information on the social and economic conditions of those who experience these events. To fill this information gap, Statistics Canada collaborated with existing partnerships in British Columbia, including the BC Coroners Service, BC Stats, the BC Centre for Disease Control and the British Columbia Ministry of Health, to create the Statistics Canada British Columbia Opioid Overdose Analytical File (BC-OOAF).

    Release date: 2021-02-17

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100042
    Description:

    The economic lockdown triggered by COVID-19 has led so far to disproportionate employment losses among lower-paid workers and young workers. Its impact on visible minorities is currently less known. Using data from a large crowdsourcing data collection initiative, the study further compares the degree to which visible minority participants: a) experienced job loss or reduced workhours since the onset of the pandemic, b) were strongly or moderately impacted financially, and c) applied for and received federal income support.

    Release date: 2020-07-06

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100004
    Description:

    With the continuing spread of COVID-19, many health-care workers in Canada are facing overwhelming workloads and risk exposure to the virus while caring for their patients. This article examines adults with a health education but not working in health occupations.

    Release date: 2020-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019024
    Description:

    The educational attainment of the Canadian population has been rising rapidly in recent decades. There is concern that educational expansion has outpaced demand, leading to an increased prevalence of over-education. Over-education is defined as educational qualification that exceeds what is required to adequately perform the job. This study uses census data to document the rising supply of university-educated workers by immigration status from 2001 to 2016. It further examines trends in over-education among university-educated workers who are recent immigrants (those who arrived in Canada 1 to 10 years before the census) and those who are Canadian-born youth (aged 25 to 34). For each population group, this study examines the extent to which the observed trend in over-education status is associated with changes in demographic characteristics and supply and demand factors.

    Release date: 2019-12-13
Stats in brief (2)

Stats in brief (2) ((2 results))

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100042
    Description:

    The economic lockdown triggered by COVID-19 has led so far to disproportionate employment losses among lower-paid workers and young workers. Its impact on visible minorities is currently less known. Using data from a large crowdsourcing data collection initiative, the study further compares the degree to which visible minority participants: a) experienced job loss or reduced workhours since the onset of the pandemic, b) were strongly or moderately impacted financially, and c) applied for and received federal income support.

    Release date: 2020-07-06

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100004
    Description:

    With the continuing spread of COVID-19, many health-care workers in Canada are facing overwhelming workloads and risk exposure to the virus while caring for their patients. This article examines adults with a health education but not working in health occupations.

    Release date: 2020-04-29
Articles and reports (10)

Articles and reports (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200400004
    Description:

    The COVID-19 pandemic and responses to it have contributed to, and probably accelerated, the roles that the internet and digital technologies play in our lives, thrusting large numbers of people and organizations online. But internet and digital skills vary and not everyone had the same capacity to rapidly shift activities of daily life online. The objective of this paper is to document the changes in the online activities and skills reported by Canadians prior to, and during, the COVID-19 pandemic. Data from 2018 and 2020 Canadian Internet Use Surveys are used to categorize Canadians into one of five internet user groups, ranging from non-users to advanced users.

    Release date: 2022-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200300006
    Description:

    This study presents a socio-demographic profile of children aged 0 to 14 years with affirmative responses to the DSQ filter questions on the 2016 Census. More specifically, the study examined the distributions of activity limitations by children’s age, sex, and family socioeconomic characteristics. The consistency of this profile with well-established patterns of child disability from the existing literature is discussed, and recommendations are made for research to further assess the suitability of the DSQ filter questions for generating an appropriate sampling frame for prospective child disability surveys.

    Release date: 2022-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2021008
    Description:

    A robust Internet typology is essential for monitoring how individuals are responding to the digital transformation and for assessing the divide between digital ‘haves’ and ‘have nots.’ Individuals’ capacities to use the Internet and digital technologies are an important aspect of this digital divide. Using data from the 2018 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS), this study presents an Internet-use typology that is based on the range and complexity of online activities and digital skills that Canadians report they perform. Five Internet-user groups are identified.

    Release date: 2021-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202101000003
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2017 Canadian Survey on Disability to examine differences in educational experiences between women and men aged 15 to 34 with a disability. These experiences capture the difficulties that persons with disabilities reported encountering in school, such as limitations on learning, social exclusion, and a lack of accommodations.

    Release date: 2021-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202101000004
    Description:

    This study used data from the 2017 Canadian Survey on Disability to examine differences in work experiences between women and men aged 20 to 54 with a disability. These experiences capture the barriers that persons with disabilities reported encountering in their jobs, workplaces, and the labour market.

    Release date: 2021-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100300004
    Description:

    This study uses the 2018 Canadian Internet Use Survey to examine reports of the negative effects individuals aged 15 to 64 experience because of their use of social networking websites or apps. Social media refers to digital platforms that allow users to create and share content (e.g., text-based posts, photos and videos) and online profiles, and to interact with other users. In 2018, social media was regularly used by about 9 in 10 Canadians aged 15 to 34, 8 in 10 of those aged 35 to 49, and 6 in 10 of those aged 50 to 64.

    Release date: 2021-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2021003
    Description:

    Canada continues to experience an opioid crisis. While there is solid information on the demographic and geographic characteristics of people experiencing fatal and non-fatal opioid overdoses in Canada, there is limited information on the social and economic conditions of those who experience these events. To fill this information gap, Statistics Canada collaborated with existing partnerships in British Columbia, including the BC Coroners Service, BC Stats, the BC Centre for Disease Control and the British Columbia Ministry of Health, to create the Statistics Canada British Columbia Opioid Overdose Analytical File (BC-OOAF).

    Release date: 2021-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019024
    Description:

    The educational attainment of the Canadian population has been rising rapidly in recent decades. There is concern that educational expansion has outpaced demand, leading to an increased prevalence of over-education. Over-education is defined as educational qualification that exceeds what is required to adequately perform the job. This study uses census data to document the rising supply of university-educated workers by immigration status from 2001 to 2016. It further examines trends in over-education among university-educated workers who are recent immigrants (those who arrived in Canada 1 to 10 years before the census) and those who are Canadian-born youth (aged 25 to 34). For each population group, this study examines the extent to which the observed trend in over-education status is associated with changes in demographic characteristics and supply and demand factors.

    Release date: 2019-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019015
    Description:

    Since 2016, Internet use rates among Canadians aged 15 to 64 have reached near-saturation (97.2%) levels. However, the diffusion of information and communications technology (ICT), including the Internet, has proceeded at a much slower pace among Canadians aged 65 and older. Given that Canada is an aging society, knowing about the factors associated with Internet use among seniors is crucial for ensuring their access to it. This study uses four cycles of the General Social Survey (2007, 2010, 2013 and 2016) to describe changes in Canadian seniors’ rates of Internet use, and examines the sociodemographic factors associated with such use.

    Release date: 2019-07-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019004
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This article in the Economics Insights series documents the employment histories and income sources of people who died of an illicit drug overdose in British Columbia from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2016. The data are from the British Columbia (BC) Coroners Service and from administrative data files.

    Release date: 2019-04-10
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