Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (35)

All (35) (0 to 10 of 35 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100400002
    Description:

    This study documents annual trends in employment and earnings of foreign workers employed in agriculture and various subsectors of agriculture, as well as the characteristics of foreign workers in this industry. It also examines transitions to permanent residence for those who entered Canada as foreign workers and worked in agriculture. The main objective of the analysis is to provide a deeper understanding of the use of foreign worker programs in agriculture in Canada.

    Release date: 2021-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100400003
    Description:

    This study examines annual trends in the employment and earnings of foreign workers in the Canadian food manufacturing industry and in specific subsectors (e.g., meat product manufacturing, dairy product manufacturing). The main objective of the analysis is to provide a deeper understanding of the use of foreign workers in food manufacturing—a sector with relatively high concentrations of foreign workers.

    Release date: 2021-04-28

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100078
    Description:

    Although the number of self-employed individuals has remained largely unchanged since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, many of the self-employed are likely to remain under severe financial strain. This article looks at the unincorporated self-employed more broadly and highlights another important factor that will likely have a large impact on their financial well-being: whether or not the self-employed individuals also have T4 earnings.

    Release date: 2020-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020009
    Description:

    The main objective of this paper is to determine whether the immigration status of the owner of a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME) affects the likelihood of a company implementing an innovation. This paper uses data from a survey of Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in 2011, 2014 and 2017, and asks whether immigrant-owned SMEs were more likely to innovate during the three years prior to the survey than those owned by Canadian-born individuals.

    Release date: 2020-06-09

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100021
    Description:

    A new study looks at the some of the challenges in tracking the gig economy in real time and profiles the approximately 1.7 million Canadians who worked in the gig economy prior to the pandemic. In addition to the short-term concerns, the study looks at how the gig economy may evolve in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic based on earlier data trends.

    Release date: 2020-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019025
    Description:

    This study identifies gig workers based on characteristics of their work arrangements and how these are reported in tax data. It introduces a definition of gig work specific to the way work arrangements are reported in the Canadian tax system and estimates the size of the gig economy in Canada using administrative data. The share of gig workers among all workers rose from 5.5% in 2005 to 8.2% in 2016. Some of this increase coincided with the introduction and proliferation of online platforms. The analysis highlights gender differences in the trends and characteristics of gig workers. By linking administrative data to 2016 Census microdata, this study also examines educational and occupational differences in the prevalence of gig workers.

    Release date: 2019-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018404
    Description:

    Using data from the 2011 and 2014 Survey on Financing and Growth of Small and Medium Enterprises, this paper examines access to financing by immigrant business owners. It documents the main financing sources of immigrant-owned and Canadian-owned small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

    Release date: 2018-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018401
    Description:

    It is well established that, in most Western countries, rates of small-business ownership tend to be higher among immigrants than among the native-born. In Canada, the overall shares of taxfilers who owned a private incorporated business in 2010 were similar for immigrants (4.6%) and the Canadian-born (4.8%). However, the rate of business ownership was substantially higher (5.8%) among immigrants who had been in Canada for 10 to 30 years. Much less is known about exit and survival patterns of immigrant-owned businesses as there is only a small body of international literature on this topic and little Canadian evidence. This paper addresses this gap by answering two questions. First, do exit and survival patterns (durations) of firm ownership differ between immigrants and individuals born in Canada? Second, what characteristics are associated with lower (or higher) exit rates from business ownership and longer ownership spells among immigrants? The analysis is limited to ownership of private incorporated firms.

    Release date: 2018-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2017010
    Description:

    Using an employer–employee matched dataset of administrative tax records on most Canadian firms and the full populations of their workers, this paper documents relationships between firm size, industry, and the typical ages of firms’ workforces. In particular, the paper considers both differences in levels for the calendar years 2003 to 2010 inclusive, as well as changes in the age composition of firms’ workforces over this time as observed in a longitudinal analysis.

    Release date: 2017-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017073
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides Canadian evidence of recent changes in intergenerational income mobility in Canada. The study uses a unique Canadian database that directly links children and parents. The analysis focuses on absolute income mobility—often seen as an indicator of economic opportunity in a society.

    Release date: 2017-05-23
Stats in brief (2)

Stats in brief (2) ((2 results))

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100078
    Description:

    Although the number of self-employed individuals has remained largely unchanged since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, many of the self-employed are likely to remain under severe financial strain. This article looks at the unincorporated self-employed more broadly and highlights another important factor that will likely have a large impact on their financial well-being: whether or not the self-employed individuals also have T4 earnings.

    Release date: 2020-09-18

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100021
    Description:

    A new study looks at the some of the challenges in tracking the gig economy in real time and profiles the approximately 1.7 million Canadians who worked in the gig economy prior to the pandemic. In addition to the short-term concerns, the study looks at how the gig economy may evolve in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic based on earlier data trends.

    Release date: 2020-05-20
Articles and reports (33)

Articles and reports (33) (0 to 10 of 33 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100400002
    Description:

    This study documents annual trends in employment and earnings of foreign workers employed in agriculture and various subsectors of agriculture, as well as the characteristics of foreign workers in this industry. It also examines transitions to permanent residence for those who entered Canada as foreign workers and worked in agriculture. The main objective of the analysis is to provide a deeper understanding of the use of foreign worker programs in agriculture in Canada.

    Release date: 2021-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100400003
    Description:

    This study examines annual trends in the employment and earnings of foreign workers in the Canadian food manufacturing industry and in specific subsectors (e.g., meat product manufacturing, dairy product manufacturing). The main objective of the analysis is to provide a deeper understanding of the use of foreign workers in food manufacturing—a sector with relatively high concentrations of foreign workers.

    Release date: 2021-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020009
    Description:

    The main objective of this paper is to determine whether the immigration status of the owner of a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME) affects the likelihood of a company implementing an innovation. This paper uses data from a survey of Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in 2011, 2014 and 2017, and asks whether immigrant-owned SMEs were more likely to innovate during the three years prior to the survey than those owned by Canadian-born individuals.

    Release date: 2020-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019025
    Description:

    This study identifies gig workers based on characteristics of their work arrangements and how these are reported in tax data. It introduces a definition of gig work specific to the way work arrangements are reported in the Canadian tax system and estimates the size of the gig economy in Canada using administrative data. The share of gig workers among all workers rose from 5.5% in 2005 to 8.2% in 2016. Some of this increase coincided with the introduction and proliferation of online platforms. The analysis highlights gender differences in the trends and characteristics of gig workers. By linking administrative data to 2016 Census microdata, this study also examines educational and occupational differences in the prevalence of gig workers.

    Release date: 2019-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018404
    Description:

    Using data from the 2011 and 2014 Survey on Financing and Growth of Small and Medium Enterprises, this paper examines access to financing by immigrant business owners. It documents the main financing sources of immigrant-owned and Canadian-owned small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

    Release date: 2018-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018401
    Description:

    It is well established that, in most Western countries, rates of small-business ownership tend to be higher among immigrants than among the native-born. In Canada, the overall shares of taxfilers who owned a private incorporated business in 2010 were similar for immigrants (4.6%) and the Canadian-born (4.8%). However, the rate of business ownership was substantially higher (5.8%) among immigrants who had been in Canada for 10 to 30 years. Much less is known about exit and survival patterns of immigrant-owned businesses as there is only a small body of international literature on this topic and little Canadian evidence. This paper addresses this gap by answering two questions. First, do exit and survival patterns (durations) of firm ownership differ between immigrants and individuals born in Canada? Second, what characteristics are associated with lower (or higher) exit rates from business ownership and longer ownership spells among immigrants? The analysis is limited to ownership of private incorporated firms.

    Release date: 2018-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2017010
    Description:

    Using an employer–employee matched dataset of administrative tax records on most Canadian firms and the full populations of their workers, this paper documents relationships between firm size, industry, and the typical ages of firms’ workforces. In particular, the paper considers both differences in levels for the calendar years 2003 to 2010 inclusive, as well as changes in the age composition of firms’ workforces over this time as observed in a longitudinal analysis.

    Release date: 2017-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017073
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides Canadian evidence of recent changes in intergenerational income mobility in Canada. The study uses a unique Canadian database that directly links children and parents. The analysis focuses on absolute income mobility—often seen as an indicator of economic opportunity in a society.

    Release date: 2017-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017069
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series describes the extent to which immigrant-owned businesses are in the ‘knowledge-based’ economy, in the more traditional ethnic economy, or in other industrial sectors. It further outlines the differences among immigrant classes (family, refugee, business and economic classes) in the types of businesses owned. The analysis focuses on two types of businesses: privately-owned incorporated companies and the unincorporated self-employed.

    Release date: 2017-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016385
    Description:

    This study contributes to the debate about the role of self-employment in helping women improve family–work balance by offering Canadian evidence from a uniquely rich dataset that links individual records from the 2006 Census of Population to records from the 2011 National Household Survey. Unlike most previous studies estimating the determinants of women’s self-employment, the analysis focuses directly on transitions from wage employment to self-employment among new mothers.

    Release date: 2016-11-25
Journals and periodicals (0)

Journals and periodicals (0) (0 results)

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