Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (7)

All (7) ((7 results))

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202100500001
    Description:

    Residential greenness has been associated with benefits to health, such as lower risk of mortality, cardiovascular disease, obesity, adverse birth outcomes, asthma and better psychological health. However, the variation in greenness across socioeconomic and demographic characteristics in urban areas of Canada has not been well documented. Authors of a study focused upon respondents to the 2001 Canadian Census reported that more affluent and more highly educated adults living in the 30 largest Census metropolitan areas of Canada had greater exposures to residential greenness than those who were less affluent and less well-educated. This study builds on that work by using data from the more recent, 2016 Census; including respondents of all ages; and by considering differences in exposures according not only to age, education, and income, but also according to immigration status, time since immigration, self-reported ethnicity, and neighbourhood deprivation indices.

    Release date: 2021-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000700001
    Description:

    The present study examined the spatial associations between air pollutants (fine particulate matter [PM2.5], nitrogen dioxide [NO2] and ground-level ozone [O3]) and psychological distress among subjects in the most populous provinces in Canada.

    Release date: 2020-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000300002
    Description:

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of non accidental and cause specific mortality associated with long term exposure to PM2.5 among immigrants after they arrived in Canada, and to assess how this risk compares with that of the non immigrant population. Using the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort, this study also sought to determine the influence of several immigrant specific variables on the PM2.5 -mortality association, including duration in Canada, country of birth, age at immigration and neighbourhood ethnic concentration.

    Release date: 2020-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201901200003
    Description:

    This article provides a description of the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs), a population-based linked datasets of the household population at the time of census collection. The CanCHEC datasets are rich national data resources that can be used to measure and examine health inequalities across socioeconomic and ethnocultural dimensions for different periods and locations. These datasets can also be used to examine the effects of exposure to environmental factors on human health.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900900001
    Description:

    The purpose of this study is to examine how the association between walkability or an "activity friendly environment" and physical activity varies across the lifespan and by the various domains of physical activity in Canadians by combining the newly-developed Canadian Active Living Environments Database (Can-ALE) with two nationally-representative health surveys. Data are from the 2016 Can-ALE database, the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2009-2015), and the Canadian Community Health Survey (2015-2016).

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900900002
    Description:

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association between walkability and obesity and self-rated general and mental health in a nationally-representative sample of Canadians in children and adults. A secondary purpose is to examine and describe the mediating effect of physical activity in the association between walkability and obesity. Data are from the 2016 Canadian Active Living Environments database and the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2009-2015).

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018013
    Description:

    Since 2008, a number of population censuses have been linked to administrative health data and to financial data. These linked datasets have been instrumental in examining health inequalities and have been used in environmental health research. This paper describes the creation of the 1996 Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort (CanCHEC)—3.57 million respondents to the census long-form questionnaire who were retrospectively followed for mortality and mobility for 16.6 years from 1996 to 2012. The 1996 CanCHEC was limited to census respondents who were aged 19 or older on Census Day (May 14, 1996), were residents of Canada, were not residents of institutions, and had filed an income tax return. These respondents were linked to death records from the Canadian Mortality Database or to the T1 Personal Master File, and to a postal code history from a variety of sources. This is the third in a set of CanCHECs that, when combined, make it possible to examine mortality trends and environmental exposures by socioeconomic characteristics over three census cycles and 21 years of census, tax, and mortality data. This report describes linkage methodologies, validation and bias assessment, and the characteristics of the 1996 CanCHEC. Representativeness of the 1996 CanCHEC relative to the adult population of Canada is also assessed.

    Release date: 2018-01-22
Stats in brief (0)

Stats in brief (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Articles and reports (7)

Articles and reports (7) ((7 results))

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202100500001
    Description:

    Residential greenness has been associated with benefits to health, such as lower risk of mortality, cardiovascular disease, obesity, adverse birth outcomes, asthma and better psychological health. However, the variation in greenness across socioeconomic and demographic characteristics in urban areas of Canada has not been well documented. Authors of a study focused upon respondents to the 2001 Canadian Census reported that more affluent and more highly educated adults living in the 30 largest Census metropolitan areas of Canada had greater exposures to residential greenness than those who were less affluent and less well-educated. This study builds on that work by using data from the more recent, 2016 Census; including respondents of all ages; and by considering differences in exposures according not only to age, education, and income, but also according to immigration status, time since immigration, self-reported ethnicity, and neighbourhood deprivation indices.

    Release date: 2021-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000700001
    Description:

    The present study examined the spatial associations between air pollutants (fine particulate matter [PM2.5], nitrogen dioxide [NO2] and ground-level ozone [O3]) and psychological distress among subjects in the most populous provinces in Canada.

    Release date: 2020-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000300002
    Description:

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of non accidental and cause specific mortality associated with long term exposure to PM2.5 among immigrants after they arrived in Canada, and to assess how this risk compares with that of the non immigrant population. Using the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort, this study also sought to determine the influence of several immigrant specific variables on the PM2.5 -mortality association, including duration in Canada, country of birth, age at immigration and neighbourhood ethnic concentration.

    Release date: 2020-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201901200003
    Description:

    This article provides a description of the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs), a population-based linked datasets of the household population at the time of census collection. The CanCHEC datasets are rich national data resources that can be used to measure and examine health inequalities across socioeconomic and ethnocultural dimensions for different periods and locations. These datasets can also be used to examine the effects of exposure to environmental factors on human health.

    Release date: 2019-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900900001
    Description:

    The purpose of this study is to examine how the association between walkability or an "activity friendly environment" and physical activity varies across the lifespan and by the various domains of physical activity in Canadians by combining the newly-developed Canadian Active Living Environments Database (Can-ALE) with two nationally-representative health surveys. Data are from the 2016 Can-ALE database, the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2009-2015), and the Canadian Community Health Survey (2015-2016).

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900900002
    Description:

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association between walkability and obesity and self-rated general and mental health in a nationally-representative sample of Canadians in children and adults. A secondary purpose is to examine and describe the mediating effect of physical activity in the association between walkability and obesity. Data are from the 2016 Canadian Active Living Environments database and the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2009-2015).

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018013
    Description:

    Since 2008, a number of population censuses have been linked to administrative health data and to financial data. These linked datasets have been instrumental in examining health inequalities and have been used in environmental health research. This paper describes the creation of the 1996 Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort (CanCHEC)—3.57 million respondents to the census long-form questionnaire who were retrospectively followed for mortality and mobility for 16.6 years from 1996 to 2012. The 1996 CanCHEC was limited to census respondents who were aged 19 or older on Census Day (May 14, 1996), were residents of Canada, were not residents of institutions, and had filed an income tax return. These respondents were linked to death records from the Canadian Mortality Database or to the T1 Personal Master File, and to a postal code history from a variety of sources. This is the third in a set of CanCHECs that, when combined, make it possible to examine mortality trends and environmental exposures by socioeconomic characteristics over three census cycles and 21 years of census, tax, and mortality data. This report describes linkage methodologies, validation and bias assessment, and the characteristics of the 1996 CanCHEC. Representativeness of the 1996 CanCHEC relative to the adult population of Canada is also assessed.

    Release date: 2018-01-22
Journals and periodicals (0)

Journals and periodicals (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: