Water transportation

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All (6) ((6 results))

  • Table: 23-10-0268-01
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Quarterly
    Description:

    As part of the Transport Canada Multimodal Safety and Security Programs Oversight Delivery Indicators, starting with the four quarters of the 2017-2018 federal government fiscal year, this table contains the number of completed inspections by programs, activities and administrative regions.

    Release date: 2019-06-10

  • Table: 38-10-0002-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 409-0011)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Marine accident key variables for top-most dangerous goods, means of containment and instigating events. Annual data is available from 1987.

    Release date: 2019-01-16

  • Table: 23-10-0236-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 406-0001)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Quarterly
    Description: This table contains 4 series, with data for years 1990 - 1999 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years), and is no longer being released. This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada), Shipping activity (2 items: International seaborne shipping; Coastwise shipping), Cargo tonnage (3 items: Cargo tonnage loaded; Cargo tonnage unloaded; Cargo tonnage handled).
    Release date: 2015-10-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 54F0001X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's major container ports have competed successfully against their U.S. counterparts for overseas container traffic. However, the ocean container shipping industry is undergoing changes that will impact on their relationships with ports and competition among ports for container traffic has been fierce. This paper explores how Canadian ports might fare in this increasingly competitive environment, based on their natural and man-made attributes, their competitive stance and their potential to meet the evolving ocean container industry.

    The assessment includes a review of the ocean container shipping industry, the North American container market and competing ports in the United States (U.S.). This report uses data from two sources, Statistics Canada's marine international origin/destination (O/D) database and the U.S. Department of Transport Maritime Administration's (MARAD) Annual Import Export Waterborne Databank which is based on Journal of Commerce P.I.E.R.S. data.

    The keys to the success of Canadian container ports have been a combination of natural endowments, investments in intermodal facilities and competitive pricing. These factors are likely to continue into the future, however, the competition among container ports is likely to intensify as industry consolidation continues and as publicly funded U.S. intermodal terminal and corridor projects come to fruition.

    Release date: 2003-06-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 54F0002X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study identifies the flag-related trends of fleets used in Canada's international sea-borne trade relative to the world fleet during the 15-year period from 1985 to 1999. The goal is to determine if there is any indication that fleets that served Canada were any less safe in 1999 than in 1985.

    This study uses fleet and ship-casualty statistics published by Lloyd's Register and data on vessel entrances and clearances from Statistics Canada's Marine International Origin-Destination Database to develop a flag-related risk index.

    Release date: 2002-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 61F0019X19990015580
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    International shipping is a highly competitve industry, especially the shipping of containers. Shipping lines are constantly trying to increase productivity by reducing costs and by attracting larger volumes of containers. In response to spiraling container freight rates, the lines have been driven to increase economies of scale. These economies are expected to be achieved through largers ships and fewer, more efficient port calls. Larger ships and client demands for frequent service have encouraged innovative alliances and pooling agreements among lines to maximize the use of this larger capacity.

    Release date: 1999-02-25
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

Analysis (3)

Analysis (3) ((3 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 54F0001X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's major container ports have competed successfully against their U.S. counterparts for overseas container traffic. However, the ocean container shipping industry is undergoing changes that will impact on their relationships with ports and competition among ports for container traffic has been fierce. This paper explores how Canadian ports might fare in this increasingly competitive environment, based on their natural and man-made attributes, their competitive stance and their potential to meet the evolving ocean container industry.

    The assessment includes a review of the ocean container shipping industry, the North American container market and competing ports in the United States (U.S.). This report uses data from two sources, Statistics Canada's marine international origin/destination (O/D) database and the U.S. Department of Transport Maritime Administration's (MARAD) Annual Import Export Waterborne Databank which is based on Journal of Commerce P.I.E.R.S. data.

    The keys to the success of Canadian container ports have been a combination of natural endowments, investments in intermodal facilities and competitive pricing. These factors are likely to continue into the future, however, the competition among container ports is likely to intensify as industry consolidation continues and as publicly funded U.S. intermodal terminal and corridor projects come to fruition.

    Release date: 2003-06-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 54F0002X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study identifies the flag-related trends of fleets used in Canada's international sea-borne trade relative to the world fleet during the 15-year period from 1985 to 1999. The goal is to determine if there is any indication that fleets that served Canada were any less safe in 1999 than in 1985.

    This study uses fleet and ship-casualty statistics published by Lloyd's Register and data on vessel entrances and clearances from Statistics Canada's Marine International Origin-Destination Database to develop a flag-related risk index.

    Release date: 2002-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 61F0019X19990015580
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    International shipping is a highly competitve industry, especially the shipping of containers. Shipping lines are constantly trying to increase productivity by reducing costs and by attracting larger volumes of containers. In response to spiraling container freight rates, the lines have been driven to increase economies of scale. These economies are expected to be achieved through largers ships and fewer, more efficient port calls. Larger ships and client demands for frequent service have encouraged innovative alliances and pooling agreements among lines to maximize the use of this larger capacity.

    Release date: 1999-02-25
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