Other content related to Statistical methods

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (61)

All (61) (60 to 70 of 61 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042288
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Unemployment estimates from the Labour Force Survey, source of the official unemployment rate, are quite different from counts of the number of Unemployment Insurance beneficiaries. This piece reviews the conceptual differences between the two data sources and quantifies many of the factors that create the discrepancies.

    Release date: 1989-12-20
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (61)

Analysis (61) (60 to 70 of 61 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042288
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Unemployment estimates from the Labour Force Survey, source of the official unemployment rate, are quite different from counts of the number of Unemployment Insurance beneficiaries. This piece reviews the conceptual differences between the two data sources and quantifies many of the factors that create the discrepancies.

    Release date: 1989-12-20
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024351
    Description:

    To calculate price indexes, data on "the same item" (actually a collection of items narrowly defined) must be collected across time periods. The question arises whether such "quasi-longitudinal" data can be modeled in such a way as to shed light on what a price index is. Leading thinkers on price indexes have questioned the feasibility of using statistical modeling at all for characterizing price indexes. This paper suggests a simple state space model of price data, yielding a consumer price index that is given in terms of the parameters of the model.

    Release date: 1999-01-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980013913
    Description:

    Temporary mobility is hypothesized to contribute toward within-household coverage error since it may affect an individual's determination of "usual residence" - a concept commonly applied when listing persons as part of a household-based survey or census. This paper explores a typology of temporary mobility patterns and how they relate to the identification of usual residence. Temporary mobility is defined by the pattern of movement away from, but usually back to a single residence over a two-three month reference period. The typology is constructed using two dimensions: the variety of places visited and the frequency of visits made. Using data from the U.S. Living Situation Survey (LSS) conducted in 1993, four types of temporary mobility patterns are identified. In particular, two groups exhibiting patterns of repeat visit behavior were found to contain more of the types of people who tend to be missed during censuses and surveys. Log-linear modeling indicates spent away and demographic characteristics.

    Release date: 1998-07-31
Date modified: