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All (69) (60 to 70 of 69 results)

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199200214487
    Description:

    This paper reviews the idea of robustness for randomisation and model-based inference for descriptive and analytic surveys. The lack of robustness for model-based procedures can be partially overcome by careful design. In this paper a robust model-based approach to analysis is proposed based on smoothing methods.

    Release date: 1992-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199200214488
    Description:

    In many finite population sampling problems the design that is optimal in the sense of minimizing the variance of the best linear unbiased estimator under a particular working model is bad in the sense of robustness - it leaves the estimator extremely vulnerable to bias if the working model is incorrect. However there are some important models under which one design provides both efficiency and robustness. We present a theorem that identifies such models and their optimal designs.

    Release date: 1992-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199100214504
    Description:

    Simple or marginal quota surveys are analyzed using two methods: (1) behaviour modelling (superpopulation model) and prediction estimation, and (2) sample modelling (simple restricted random sampling) and estimation derived from the sample distribution. In both cases the limitations of the theory used to establish the variance formulas and estimates when measuring totals are described. An extension of the quota method (non-proportional quotas) is also briefly described and analyzed. In some cases, this may provide a very significant improvement in survey precision. The advantages of the quota method are compared with those of random sampling. The latter remains indispensable in the case of large scale surveys within the framework of Official Statistics.

    Release date: 1991-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199100114521
    Description:

    Marginal and approximate conditional likelihoods are given for the correlation parameters in a normal linear regression model with correlated errors. This general likelihood approach is applied to obtain marginal and approximate conditional likelihoods for the correlation parameters in sampling on successive occasions under both simple random sampling on each occasion and more complex surveys.

    Release date: 1991-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199000114560
    Description:

    Early developments in sampling theory and methods largely concentrated on efficient sampling designs and associated estimation techniques for population totals or means. More recently, the theoretical foundations of survey based estimation have also been critically examined, and formal frameworks for inference on totals or means have emerged. During the past 10 years or so, rapid progress has also been made in the development of methods for the analysis of survey data that take account of the complexity of the sampling design. The scope of this paper is restricted to an overview and appraisal of some of these developments.

    Release date: 1990-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198900214568
    Description:

    The paper describes a Monte Carlo study of simultaneous confidence interval procedures for k > 2 proportions, under a model of two-stage cluster sampling. The procedures investigated include: (i) standard multinomial intervals; (ii) Scheffé intervals based on sample estimates of the variances of cell proportions; (iii) Quesenberry-Hurst intervals adapted for clustered data using Rao and Scott’s first and second order adjustments to X^2; (iv) simple Bonferroni intervals; (v) Bonferroni intervals based on transformations of the estimated proportions; (vi) Bonferroni intervals computed using the critical points of Student’s t. In several realistic situations, actual coverage rates of the multinomial procedures were found to be seriously depressed compared to the nominal rate. The best performing intervals, from the point of view of coverage rates and coverage symmetry (an extension of an idea due to Jennings), were the t-based Bonferroni intervals derived using log and logit transformations. Of the Scheffé-like procedures, the best performance was provided by Quesenberry-Hurst intervals in combination with first-order Rao-Scott adjustments.

    Release date: 1989-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198500114364
    Description:

    Conventional methods of inference in survey sampling are critically examined. The need for conditioning the inference on recognizable subsets of the population is emphasized. A number of real examples involving random sample sizes are presented to illustrate inferences conditional on the realized sample configuration and associated difficulties. The examples include the following: estimation of (a) population mean under simple random sampling; (b) population mean in the presence of outliers; (c) domain total and domain mean; (d) population mean with two-way stratification; (e) population mean in the presence of non-responses; (f) population mean under general designs. The conditional bias and the conditional variance of estimators of a population mean (or a domain mean or total), and the associated confidence intervals, are examined.

    Release date: 1985-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198400114351
    Description:

    Most sample surveys conducted by organizations such as Statistics Canada or the U.S. Bureau of the Census employ complex designs. The design-based approach to statistical inference, typically the institutional standard of inference for simple population statistics such as means and totals, may be extended to parameters of analytic models as well. Most of this paper focuses on application of design-based inferences to such models, but rationales are offered for use of model-based alternatives in some instances, by way of explanation for the author’s observation that both modes of inference are used in practice at his own institution.

    Within the design-based approach to inference, the paper briefly describes experience with linear regression analysis. Recently, variance computations for a number of surveys of the Census Bureau have been implemented through “replicate weighting”; the principal application has been for variances of simple statistics, but this technique also facilitates variance computation for virtually any complex analytic model. Finally, approaches and experience with log-linear models are reported.

    Release date: 1984-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198100214319
    Description:

    The problems associated with making analytical inferences from data based on complex sample designs are reviewed. A basic issue is the definition of the parameter of interest and whether it is a superpopulation model parameter or a finite population parameter. General methods based on a generalized Wald Statistics and its modification or on modifications of classical test statistics are discussed. More detail is given on specific methods-on linear models and regression and on categorical data analysis.

    Release date: 1981-12-15
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Analysis (69)

Analysis (69) (60 to 70 of 69 results)

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199200214487
    Description:

    This paper reviews the idea of robustness for randomisation and model-based inference for descriptive and analytic surveys. The lack of robustness for model-based procedures can be partially overcome by careful design. In this paper a robust model-based approach to analysis is proposed based on smoothing methods.

    Release date: 1992-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199200214488
    Description:

    In many finite population sampling problems the design that is optimal in the sense of minimizing the variance of the best linear unbiased estimator under a particular working model is bad in the sense of robustness - it leaves the estimator extremely vulnerable to bias if the working model is incorrect. However there are some important models under which one design provides both efficiency and robustness. We present a theorem that identifies such models and their optimal designs.

    Release date: 1992-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199100214504
    Description:

    Simple or marginal quota surveys are analyzed using two methods: (1) behaviour modelling (superpopulation model) and prediction estimation, and (2) sample modelling (simple restricted random sampling) and estimation derived from the sample distribution. In both cases the limitations of the theory used to establish the variance formulas and estimates when measuring totals are described. An extension of the quota method (non-proportional quotas) is also briefly described and analyzed. In some cases, this may provide a very significant improvement in survey precision. The advantages of the quota method are compared with those of random sampling. The latter remains indispensable in the case of large scale surveys within the framework of Official Statistics.

    Release date: 1991-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199100114521
    Description:

    Marginal and approximate conditional likelihoods are given for the correlation parameters in a normal linear regression model with correlated errors. This general likelihood approach is applied to obtain marginal and approximate conditional likelihoods for the correlation parameters in sampling on successive occasions under both simple random sampling on each occasion and more complex surveys.

    Release date: 1991-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X199000114560
    Description:

    Early developments in sampling theory and methods largely concentrated on efficient sampling designs and associated estimation techniques for population totals or means. More recently, the theoretical foundations of survey based estimation have also been critically examined, and formal frameworks for inference on totals or means have emerged. During the past 10 years or so, rapid progress has also been made in the development of methods for the analysis of survey data that take account of the complexity of the sampling design. The scope of this paper is restricted to an overview and appraisal of some of these developments.

    Release date: 1990-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198900214568
    Description:

    The paper describes a Monte Carlo study of simultaneous confidence interval procedures for k > 2 proportions, under a model of two-stage cluster sampling. The procedures investigated include: (i) standard multinomial intervals; (ii) Scheffé intervals based on sample estimates of the variances of cell proportions; (iii) Quesenberry-Hurst intervals adapted for clustered data using Rao and Scott’s first and second order adjustments to X^2; (iv) simple Bonferroni intervals; (v) Bonferroni intervals based on transformations of the estimated proportions; (vi) Bonferroni intervals computed using the critical points of Student’s t. In several realistic situations, actual coverage rates of the multinomial procedures were found to be seriously depressed compared to the nominal rate. The best performing intervals, from the point of view of coverage rates and coverage symmetry (an extension of an idea due to Jennings), were the t-based Bonferroni intervals derived using log and logit transformations. Of the Scheffé-like procedures, the best performance was provided by Quesenberry-Hurst intervals in combination with first-order Rao-Scott adjustments.

    Release date: 1989-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198500114364
    Description:

    Conventional methods of inference in survey sampling are critically examined. The need for conditioning the inference on recognizable subsets of the population is emphasized. A number of real examples involving random sample sizes are presented to illustrate inferences conditional on the realized sample configuration and associated difficulties. The examples include the following: estimation of (a) population mean under simple random sampling; (b) population mean in the presence of outliers; (c) domain total and domain mean; (d) population mean with two-way stratification; (e) population mean in the presence of non-responses; (f) population mean under general designs. The conditional bias and the conditional variance of estimators of a population mean (or a domain mean or total), and the associated confidence intervals, are examined.

    Release date: 1985-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198400114351
    Description:

    Most sample surveys conducted by organizations such as Statistics Canada or the U.S. Bureau of the Census employ complex designs. The design-based approach to statistical inference, typically the institutional standard of inference for simple population statistics such as means and totals, may be extended to parameters of analytic models as well. Most of this paper focuses on application of design-based inferences to such models, but rationales are offered for use of model-based alternatives in some instances, by way of explanation for the author’s observation that both modes of inference are used in practice at his own institution.

    Within the design-based approach to inference, the paper briefly describes experience with linear regression analysis. Recently, variance computations for a number of surveys of the Census Bureau have been implemented through “replicate weighting”; the principal application has been for variances of simple statistics, but this technique also facilitates variance computation for virtually any complex analytic model. Finally, approaches and experience with log-linear models are reported.

    Release date: 1984-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X198100214319
    Description:

    The problems associated with making analytical inferences from data based on complex sample designs are reviewed. A basic issue is the definition of the parameter of interest and whether it is a superpopulation model parameter or a finite population parameter. General methods based on a generalized Wald Statistics and its modification or on modifications of classical test statistics are discussed. More detail is given on specific methods-on linear models and regression and on categorical data analysis.

    Release date: 1981-12-15
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19970013101
    Description:

    In the main body of statistics, sampling is often disposed of by assuming a sampling process that selects random variables such that they are independent and identically distributed (IID). Important techniques, like regression and contingency table analysis, were developed largely in the IID world; hence, adjustments are needed to use them in complex survey settings. Rather than adjust the analysis, however, what is new in the present formulation is to draw a second sample from the original sample. In this second sample, the first set of selections are inverted, so as to yield at the end a simple random sample. Of course, to employ this two-step process to draw a single simple random sample from the usually much larger complex survey would be inefficient, so multiple simple random samples are drawn and a way to base inferences on them developed. Not all original samples can be inverted; but many practical special cases are discussed which cover a wide range of practices.

    Release date: 1997-08-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19970013102
    Description:

    The selection of auxiliary variables is considered for regression estimation in finite populations under a simple random sampling design. This problem is a basic one for model-based and model-assisted survey sampling approaches and is of practical importance when the number of variables available is large. An approach is developed in which a mean squared error estimator is minimised. This approach is compared to alternative approaches using a fixed set of auxiliary variables, a conventional significance test criterion, a condition number reduction approach and a ridge regression approach. The proposed approach is found to perform well in terms of efficiency. It is noted that the variable selection approach affects the properties of standard variance estimators and thus leads to a problem of variance estimation.

    Release date: 1997-08-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19960022980
    Description:

    In this paper, we study a confidence interval estimation method for a finite population average when some auxiliairy information is available. As demonstrated by Royall and Cumberland in a series of empirical studies, naive use of existing methods to construct confidence intervals for population averages may result in very poor conditional coverage probabilities, conditional on the sample mean of the covariate. When this happens, we propose to transform the data to improve the precision of the normal approximation. The transformed data are then used to make inference on the original population average, and the auxiliary information is incorporated into the inference directly, or by calibration with empirical likelihood. Our approach is design-based. We apply our approach to six real populations and find that when transformation is needed, our approach performs well compared to the usual regression method.

    Release date: 1997-01-30
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