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All (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114785
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada explores the criminal victimization of women and girls as well as their involvement in the criminal justice system as offenders. It covers the types of criminal victimization experienced by females over time; where possible, highlighting important differences in violent crime by Aboriginal identity, immigrant status, visible minority status and age. The use of formal and informal support services is explored, including changes over time in the use of police services. This chapter also reports trends in the number and types of crimes committed by females, along with their involvement in the criminal courts and correctional systems.

    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201705315428
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114680
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: The Girl Child" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of girls aged 17 and under. The chapter describes the demographic characteristics of girls in Canada and presents several topics related to their well-being including: living arrangements, socioeconomic conditions, physical health and development, mortality, emotional and social health and development, child care, school readiness, education, and personal security. Where possible, comparisons are made between girls in different age groups, between girls and boys, and within several subpopulations.

    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114640
    Description:

    Women have become increasingly well-educated, and today their share in the Canadian labour market is larger than ever. This chapter of Women in Canada examines women’s educational experiences, with a focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics and computer science) education and skills. Topics include a profile of women’s education in Canada, the skills of young girls and women, field-of-study patterns at the postsecondary level, and labour market outcomes, including earnings.

    Release date: 2016-07-06

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201617614641
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114316
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines many aspects related to senior women in Canada including their socio-demographic characteristics, life expectancy, living arrangements, social participation, Internet use, health, assistance with daily living and leading causes of death, as well as economic characteristics including their labour force participation and income. The focus will be on recent patterns, with discussion of historical trends where appropriate, including selected analysis by ethnocultural diversity and geographic region.

    Release date: 2016-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114315
    Description:

    In this chapter of Women in Canada, the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of visible minority women and girls are explored. Topics include the growth of the visible minority population in Canada and its relationship to immigration, living arrangements, education, labour force participation and employment, social participation, and health. Where it is relevant and feasible, analyses compare both the total visible minority population and specific visible minority groups with the population not belonging to a visible minority group.

    Note: the term “visible minority” refers to one of four designated groups under the Employment Equity Act. Within this context, visible minorities are defined as “persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.”

    Release date: 2016-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114313
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: First Nations, Métis and Inuit Women" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of Aboriginal women in Canada. Overall, the chapter highlights demographic characteristics, families, housing, knowledge of Aboriginal languages, employment, income, education, and health. Where appropriate, comparisons have been made between the Aboriginal female population and the non-Aboriginal female population as well as the Aboriginal female population and Aboriginal male population. Wherever possible, information is provided for First Nations, Métis and Inuit women separately.

    Release date: 2016-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114217
    Description:

    Over the last century, millions of women, either alone or with their families, have travelled from abroad to make Canada their home. These newcomers form a diverse group, arriving from regions spanning the globe and speaking close to 200 languages between them. As newcomers to Canada, the socio-demographic profile of immigrant women in Canada differs from that of the Canadian-born population in some ways, while it is relatively similar in others. This chapter compares these two socio-demographic profiles from a gender-based perspective. It also discusses changing trends in immigration, and the influence of these trends on the demographic characteristics of the immigrant population in Canada.

    Release date: 2015-10-21
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  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114785
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada explores the criminal victimization of women and girls as well as their involvement in the criminal justice system as offenders. It covers the types of criminal victimization experienced by females over time; where possible, highlighting important differences in violent crime by Aboriginal identity, immigrant status, visible minority status and age. The use of formal and informal support services is explored, including changes over time in the use of police services. This chapter also reports trends in the number and types of crimes committed by females, along with their involvement in the criminal courts and correctional systems.

    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201705315428
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114680
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: The Girl Child" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of girls aged 17 and under. The chapter describes the demographic characteristics of girls in Canada and presents several topics related to their well-being including: living arrangements, socioeconomic conditions, physical health and development, mortality, emotional and social health and development, child care, school readiness, education, and personal security. Where possible, comparisons are made between girls in different age groups, between girls and boys, and within several subpopulations.

    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114640
    Description:

    Women have become increasingly well-educated, and today their share in the Canadian labour market is larger than ever. This chapter of Women in Canada examines women’s educational experiences, with a focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics and computer science) education and skills. Topics include a profile of women’s education in Canada, the skills of young girls and women, field-of-study patterns at the postsecondary level, and labour market outcomes, including earnings.

    Release date: 2016-07-06

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201617614641
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114316
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines many aspects related to senior women in Canada including their socio-demographic characteristics, life expectancy, living arrangements, social participation, Internet use, health, assistance with daily living and leading causes of death, as well as economic characteristics including their labour force participation and income. The focus will be on recent patterns, with discussion of historical trends where appropriate, including selected analysis by ethnocultural diversity and geographic region.

    Release date: 2016-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114315
    Description:

    In this chapter of Women in Canada, the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of visible minority women and girls are explored. Topics include the growth of the visible minority population in Canada and its relationship to immigration, living arrangements, education, labour force participation and employment, social participation, and health. Where it is relevant and feasible, analyses compare both the total visible minority population and specific visible minority groups with the population not belonging to a visible minority group.

    Note: the term “visible minority” refers to one of four designated groups under the Employment Equity Act. Within this context, visible minorities are defined as “persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.”

    Release date: 2016-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114313
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: First Nations, Métis and Inuit Women" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of Aboriginal women in Canada. Overall, the chapter highlights demographic characteristics, families, housing, knowledge of Aboriginal languages, employment, income, education, and health. Where appropriate, comparisons have been made between the Aboriginal female population and the non-Aboriginal female population as well as the Aboriginal female population and Aboriginal male population. Wherever possible, information is provided for First Nations, Métis and Inuit women separately.

    Release date: 2016-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114217
    Description:

    Over the last century, millions of women, either alone or with their families, have travelled from abroad to make Canada their home. These newcomers form a diverse group, arriving from regions spanning the globe and speaking close to 200 languages between them. As newcomers to Canada, the socio-demographic profile of immigrant women in Canada differs from that of the Canadian-born population in some ways, while it is relatively similar in others. This chapter compares these two socio-demographic profiles from a gender-based perspective. It also discusses changing trends in immigration, and the influence of these trends on the demographic characteristics of the immigrant population in Canada.

    Release date: 2015-10-21
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