Care and social support

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All (40) (0 to 10 of 40 results)

  • Table: 17-10-0133-01
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    The ratio of the combined population aged between 0 to 19 years old and the population aged of 65 years and over to the population aged between 20 to 64 years old. This ratio is presented as the number of dependents for every 100 people in the working age population.

    Release date: 2020-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000300003
    Description:

    This study examines an objective and a subjective measure of social isolation and their associations with mortality for Canadian seniors aged 65 or older.

    Release date: 2020-06-17

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100007
    Description:

    In an effort to avoid the spread of COVID-19, Canadians are engaging in physical distancing to minimize their social contact with others. However, social support systems continue to play an important role during this time. This study examines the level of social support reported by seniors living in private households.

    Release date: 2020-04-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154977
    Description:

    This study uses the 2016 General Social Survey on Canadians at Work and Home to provide a recent assessment of the life satisfaction of seniors in Canada. It includes information on overall life satisfaction, as well as information on nine domains of life satisfaction: standard of living; health; current achievement in life; personal relationships; feeling part of the community; time available to do desired things; and quality of local environment. The paper also explores the factors associated with life satisfaction, and examines several measures of resilience among Canadian seniors.

    Release date: 2018-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201800554966
    Description:

    The aging of the Canadian population has increased attention on the future need for nursing home beds. Although current projections rely primarily on age and sex, other factors also contribute to the need for long-term care. This study seeks to identify additional factors to age and sex that contribute to Canadians transitioning from living at home to living in a seniors' residence or nursing home. The data are from a record linkage project that combined three cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey and the 2011 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2018-05-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114142
    Description:

    This article provides information on the care provided by caregivers to seniors with a long-term health condition, a disability or problems related to aging. It focuses on how the intensity and nature of the care vary depending on seniors’ type of housing. Four types of housing are examined: care facilities, supportive housing, private households separate from the caregiver, and private households shared with the caregiver.

    Release date: 2015-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200411760
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging to provide a profile of community-dwelling seniors receiving home care and describe the types of care they receive from formal and informal sources. Seniors' unmet needs for professional home care are also examined.

    Release date: 2012-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200411720
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Data from the 2008/2009 Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging were used to examine the relationship between frequent social participation and self-perceived health, loneliness and life dissatisfaction in a sample of people aged 65 or older.

    Release date: 2012-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200311694
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study compares the characteristics of caregivers with those of their contemporaries who are not caregivers. In addition, the characteristics of the care that caregivers provide are outlined, as are the positive and negatives aspects of caregiving.

    Release date: 2012-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111072
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    As our population ages, more and more people are required to provide care or assistance to an elderly parent. In 2007, about one in five caregivers lived more than one hour away from the parent they were assisting. This study provides a profile of caregivers according to whether they lived at varying distances from the parent to whom they were providing care. Information is provided about the socio-economic characteristics of caregivers, the types and frequency of care provided, the use of additional sources of assistance, etc. The primary focus is on the financial, social and work consequences associated with assisting a parent who lives far from a caregiver's place of residence.

    Release date: 2010-01-26
Data (18)

Data (18) (0 to 10 of 18 results)

Analysis (21)

Analysis (21) (0 to 10 of 21 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202000300003
    Description:

    This study examines an objective and a subjective measure of social isolation and their associations with mortality for Canadian seniors aged 65 or older.

    Release date: 2020-06-17

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100007
    Description:

    In an effort to avoid the spread of COVID-19, Canadians are engaging in physical distancing to minimize their social contact with others. However, social support systems continue to play an important role during this time. This study examines the level of social support reported by seniors living in private households.

    Release date: 2020-04-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154977
    Description:

    This study uses the 2016 General Social Survey on Canadians at Work and Home to provide a recent assessment of the life satisfaction of seniors in Canada. It includes information on overall life satisfaction, as well as information on nine domains of life satisfaction: standard of living; health; current achievement in life; personal relationships; feeling part of the community; time available to do desired things; and quality of local environment. The paper also explores the factors associated with life satisfaction, and examines several measures of resilience among Canadian seniors.

    Release date: 2018-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201800554966
    Description:

    The aging of the Canadian population has increased attention on the future need for nursing home beds. Although current projections rely primarily on age and sex, other factors also contribute to the need for long-term care. This study seeks to identify additional factors to age and sex that contribute to Canadians transitioning from living at home to living in a seniors' residence or nursing home. The data are from a record linkage project that combined three cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey and the 2011 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2018-05-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114142
    Description:

    This article provides information on the care provided by caregivers to seniors with a long-term health condition, a disability or problems related to aging. It focuses on how the intensity and nature of the care vary depending on seniors’ type of housing. Four types of housing are examined: care facilities, supportive housing, private households separate from the caregiver, and private households shared with the caregiver.

    Release date: 2015-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200411760
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging to provide a profile of community-dwelling seniors receiving home care and describe the types of care they receive from formal and informal sources. Seniors' unmet needs for professional home care are also examined.

    Release date: 2012-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200411720
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Data from the 2008/2009 Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging were used to examine the relationship between frequent social participation and self-perceived health, loneliness and life dissatisfaction in a sample of people aged 65 or older.

    Release date: 2012-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200311694
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study compares the characteristics of caregivers with those of their contemporaries who are not caregivers. In addition, the characteristics of the care that caregivers provide are outlined, as are the positive and negatives aspects of caregiving.

    Release date: 2012-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111072
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    As our population ages, more and more people are required to provide care or assistance to an elderly parent. In 2007, about one in five caregivers lived more than one hour away from the parent they were assisting. This study provides a profile of caregivers according to whether they lived at varying distances from the parent to whom they were providing care. Information is provided about the socio-economic characteristics of caregivers, the types and frequency of care provided, the use of additional sources of assistance, etc. The primary focus is on the financial, social and work consequences associated with assisting a parent who lives far from a caregiver's place of residence.

    Release date: 2010-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M2008009
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In Canada, there has been growing discussion over the aging of the population and other socio-demographic trends which affect the availability of the informal support network of the elderly population. Noting the lower fertility rates of baby boomers, the increased participation of women in the labour force and changing family structure in terms of increased divorce and reconstituted families, assumptions of continued high level assistance from informal support networks - family and friends - are often criticized.

    The main objective of this research is to project the future availability of informal support network to meet the need for assistance in performing everyday activities among the disabled elderly population for the period 2001 to 2031. The research examined both sides - supply and demand - of the projected increases in need for assistance for disabled older persons. Future trends are analyzed in terms of demand for support, (that is, changes in the rates of disability among the elderly population), and supply of informal support, (which is largely related to the extent and composition of the family network). Data from two national surveys, the 1996 National Population Health Survey (NPHS) and the 1996 General Social Survey (GSS), are used to identify factors associated with disability and sources of assistance among the elderly population. These results were entered into Statistics Canada's LifePaths microsimulation model to project the use of informal and formal networks in the future. The model also incorporates three disability scenarios to test the sensitivity of the projections when different assumptions are considered. The implications of these trends on the future need for chronic home care services are discussed.

    The results show that for the period 2001 to 2031, the average annual growth rate of the number of disabled elderly needing assistance could be about 2.5%. However, the sensitivity analysis shows that an improvement in the health of the population could reduce in a non negligible way this growth rate.

    The results also show that, all things being equal, a greater proportion of elderly persons living with a spouse would relieve some of the pressure on the formal network. This positive effect could be dampened in part when joint survivorship is also meaning joint disability.

    Release date: 2008-12-18
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

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