Elder abuse and victimization

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All (10)

All (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201200111627
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents information on violent and household victimization as reported by Canadians aged 55 years and older living in the ten provinces during 2009. It analyses the characteristics associated with such incidents, including the socio-demographic characteristics of victims (e.g. age, marital status), offender characteristics (e.g. number of offenders, sex), reporting incidents to police, consequences of victimization, and perceptions of personal safety and sense of community belonging.

    Release date: 2012-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2007014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    With the increasing proportion of seniors in Canada, there has been a growing concern about their risk of becoming victims of crime. Using data from self-reported victimization and police-reported surveys, this profile examines the nature and prevalence of violent and property crimes against seniors. The report also examines characteristics of offences committed against seniors, the level of reporting to the police and the proportion of incidents involving weapons and causing injuries to senior victims. Furthermore, information on seniors' fear of crime, the prevalence of spousal abuse and seniors' risk of telemarketing fraud is also presented. According to self-reported and police reported data, seniors' experience the lowest levels of violent and property crimes compared to their younger counterparts. However, seniors may be more vulnerable to telemarketing fraud. Seniors' level of satisfaction with their overall personal safety has improved over the last five years.

    Release date: 2007-03-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20050008649
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Persons over the age of 65 represented 13% of the Canadian population compared to 11% in. It is projected that persons age 65 years and over will represent 15% of the population of Canada. Concern for the well-being of seniors is heightened by the fact that this segment of the population is growing faster than any other age cohort. There are numerous implications for Canadian society as a result of this growth including meeting the health needs of an aging population as well as ensuring that seniors are not victims of violent crime either from within or outside of the family.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20040006984
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    With the aging of Canada's population in recent years, there has been a corresponding shift in how to meet the needs of Canada's older adults. Community-based care has become the preferred method over institutional care for seniors who require assistance, with the majority of the caregiving duties being left to family members and friends

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20030006542
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This chapter focusses on violence and homicides committed against older adults by family members as reported to police forces across Canada in 2001. In addition, trends over time are examined.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046496
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines violence committed against senior citizens, using self-reported data from the 1999 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20020006456
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Persons aged 65 years and older constitute one of the fastest growing segments of the Canadian population. In 2000, there were an estimated 3.8 million older men and women representing 13% of the country's total population, up from 9% just 20 years earlier. Declining fertility rates and increased longevity, due primarily to improved health care, have contributed to this rapid growth. And as the baby-boom generation (those born between 1946 and 1965) begins to reach the age of 65 early in the next decade, the absolute number of older adults, as well as their share of the total population, is expected to grow even more quickly. Indeed, by 2021, population projections estimate that older Canadians will number close to 6.7 million or about one-fifth of the total population (George et al. 2001).

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20000005255
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since the 1980s, abuse of older Canadians has gained the attention of service providers, researchers, lobbyists, as well as policy makers. Abuse can include physical, psychological or financial mistreatment of adults over the age of 65 years. To date, a lack of data has made it difficult to quantify and truly understand the nature of abuse against older adults.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X19990005309
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since the 1980s, abuse of older Canadians has gained the attention of service providers, researchers, lobbyists, as well as policy makers. Abus can include physical, psychological or financial mistreatment of adults over the age of 65 years. A lack of information has made it difficult to quantify and truly understand the nature of the problem.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X19980005288
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    With the aging of Canada's population projected to increase into the next century, the study of the abuse of older adults may become increasingly important to health and social service providers, the justice community, and Canadians in general.

    Release date: 1998-05-28
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Analysis (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201200111627
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents information on violent and household victimization as reported by Canadians aged 55 years and older living in the ten provinces during 2009. It analyses the characteristics associated with such incidents, including the socio-demographic characteristics of victims (e.g. age, marital status), offender characteristics (e.g. number of offenders, sex), reporting incidents to police, consequences of victimization, and perceptions of personal safety and sense of community belonging.

    Release date: 2012-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2007014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    With the increasing proportion of seniors in Canada, there has been a growing concern about their risk of becoming victims of crime. Using data from self-reported victimization and police-reported surveys, this profile examines the nature and prevalence of violent and property crimes against seniors. The report also examines characteristics of offences committed against seniors, the level of reporting to the police and the proportion of incidents involving weapons and causing injuries to senior victims. Furthermore, information on seniors' fear of crime, the prevalence of spousal abuse and seniors' risk of telemarketing fraud is also presented. According to self-reported and police reported data, seniors' experience the lowest levels of violent and property crimes compared to their younger counterparts. However, seniors may be more vulnerable to telemarketing fraud. Seniors' level of satisfaction with their overall personal safety has improved over the last five years.

    Release date: 2007-03-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20050008649
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Persons over the age of 65 represented 13% of the Canadian population compared to 11% in. It is projected that persons age 65 years and over will represent 15% of the population of Canada. Concern for the well-being of seniors is heightened by the fact that this segment of the population is growing faster than any other age cohort. There are numerous implications for Canadian society as a result of this growth including meeting the health needs of an aging population as well as ensuring that seniors are not victims of violent crime either from within or outside of the family.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20040006984
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    With the aging of Canada's population in recent years, there has been a corresponding shift in how to meet the needs of Canada's older adults. Community-based care has become the preferred method over institutional care for seniors who require assistance, with the majority of the caregiving duties being left to family members and friends

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20030006542
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This chapter focusses on violence and homicides committed against older adults by family members as reported to police forces across Canada in 2001. In addition, trends over time are examined.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046496
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines violence committed against senior citizens, using self-reported data from the 1999 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20020006456
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Persons aged 65 years and older constitute one of the fastest growing segments of the Canadian population. In 2000, there were an estimated 3.8 million older men and women representing 13% of the country's total population, up from 9% just 20 years earlier. Declining fertility rates and increased longevity, due primarily to improved health care, have contributed to this rapid growth. And as the baby-boom generation (those born between 1946 and 1965) begins to reach the age of 65 early in the next decade, the absolute number of older adults, as well as their share of the total population, is expected to grow even more quickly. Indeed, by 2021, population projections estimate that older Canadians will number close to 6.7 million or about one-fifth of the total population (George et al. 2001).

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20000005255
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since the 1980s, abuse of older Canadians has gained the attention of service providers, researchers, lobbyists, as well as policy makers. Abuse can include physical, psychological or financial mistreatment of adults over the age of 65 years. To date, a lack of data has made it difficult to quantify and truly understand the nature of abuse against older adults.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X19990005309
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since the 1980s, abuse of older Canadians has gained the attention of service providers, researchers, lobbyists, as well as policy makers. Abus can include physical, psychological or financial mistreatment of adults over the age of 65 years. A lack of information has made it difficult to quantify and truly understand the nature of the problem.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X19980005288
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    With the aging of Canada's population projected to increase into the next century, the study of the abuse of older adults may become increasingly important to health and social service providers, the justice community, and Canadians in general.

    Release date: 1998-05-28
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