Employment and unemployment

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  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200211675
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The NEET indicator - the proportion of youth age 15 to 29 who are neither in education nor employment - is regularly published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to document aspects of the transition into adulthood. The indicator emerged in the United Kingdom in the 1990s in response to concerns about the social exclusion of disadvantaged youth. This paper examines trends in Canadian NEET rates as well as the characteristics and activities of NEET youth.

    Release date: 2012-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111612
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and men's and women's role expectations are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995, who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. This article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on, paid jobs and unpaid household work for individuals age 20 to 29 from three generations - late Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y.

    Release date: 2011-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211520
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and the role expectations for men and women are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995 and who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. Using General Social Survey - Time use data from 1986, 1998 and 2010 this article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on paid work and unpaid household work of individuals aged 20 to 29 from three generations' late baby boomers, Generation X and Generation Y. The final section looks at the distribution of time spent on paid and unpaid work within dual-earner couples.

    Release date: 2011-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810813215
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    More than a quarter of employed Canadians work something other than a regular daytime schedule regular evenings or nights, rotating or split shifts, casual or on-call jobs or irregular shifts. This article focuses on shift work among full-time workers aged 19 to 64 and looks at where and among whom it is most prevalent. Work-life balance, role overload and other indicators of well-being are also examined.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713167
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The division of labour between men and women continues to evolve. Today's couples have a much more equal partnership in sharing financial, child care and household responsibilities. This has been brought about in large part by the expanding economic role of women, which has helped erode the idea that men should be primarily responsible for paid work while women look after unpaid household and family duties.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Presented here is an analysis of time use and quality of life that allows us to gain a better understanding of the new transitions young people in Canada are experiencing. Based on a gender analysis, the study shows the impact of paid work on young people's schedules while they are still in school, comparing those in high school with those at the postsecondary level. The same analysis is then applied to those having completed their transition to employment, where studying is no longer their main activity.

    The results suggest that men and women encounter somewhat different experiences. One finding pertains to the pace of the transition. While young men enter the workforce earlier and work more intensely, young women experience a combination of several simultaneous transitions, such as entering a conjugal relationship and having children.

    A second finding is related to the impact on time use of paid work while studying. The analysis reveals that re-organizing daily activities is not simply a matter of substituting work hours for study hours; many other areas are impacted by students working, such as sleep and active leisure time. The effects vary depending on the number of work hours. Women at the postsecondary level working more than 20 hours a week sacrifice more study time.

    A third finding looks into changes in attitudes regarding school-to-work transitions. Quality of life and time perception indicators suggest that introducing paid work into young men's schedules is regarded as an overall improvement in their life. Young women, however, seem adversely affected, suggesting that they are more vulnerable to stress induced by schedule conflicts.

    Release date: 2004-02-25
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Analysis (6)

Analysis (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200211675
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The NEET indicator - the proportion of youth age 15 to 29 who are neither in education nor employment - is regularly published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to document aspects of the transition into adulthood. The indicator emerged in the United Kingdom in the 1990s in response to concerns about the social exclusion of disadvantaged youth. This paper examines trends in Canadian NEET rates as well as the characteristics and activities of NEET youth.

    Release date: 2012-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111612
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and men's and women's role expectations are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995, who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. This article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on, paid jobs and unpaid household work for individuals age 20 to 29 from three generations - late Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y.

    Release date: 2011-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211520
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and the role expectations for men and women are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995 and who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. Using General Social Survey - Time use data from 1986, 1998 and 2010 this article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on paid work and unpaid household work of individuals aged 20 to 29 from three generations' late baby boomers, Generation X and Generation Y. The final section looks at the distribution of time spent on paid and unpaid work within dual-earner couples.

    Release date: 2011-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810813215
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    More than a quarter of employed Canadians work something other than a regular daytime schedule regular evenings or nights, rotating or split shifts, casual or on-call jobs or irregular shifts. This article focuses on shift work among full-time workers aged 19 to 64 and looks at where and among whom it is most prevalent. Work-life balance, role overload and other indicators of well-being are also examined.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713167
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The division of labour between men and women continues to evolve. Today's couples have a much more equal partnership in sharing financial, child care and household responsibilities. This has been brought about in large part by the expanding economic role of women, which has helped erode the idea that men should be primarily responsible for paid work while women look after unpaid household and family duties.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Presented here is an analysis of time use and quality of life that allows us to gain a better understanding of the new transitions young people in Canada are experiencing. Based on a gender analysis, the study shows the impact of paid work on young people's schedules while they are still in school, comparing those in high school with those at the postsecondary level. The same analysis is then applied to those having completed their transition to employment, where studying is no longer their main activity.

    The results suggest that men and women encounter somewhat different experiences. One finding pertains to the pace of the transition. While young men enter the workforce earlier and work more intensely, young women experience a combination of several simultaneous transitions, such as entering a conjugal relationship and having children.

    A second finding is related to the impact on time use of paid work while studying. The analysis reveals that re-organizing daily activities is not simply a matter of substituting work hours for study hours; many other areas are impacted by students working, such as sleep and active leisure time. The effects vary depending on the number of work hours. Women at the postsecondary level working more than 20 hours a week sacrifice more study time.

    A third finding looks into changes in attitudes regarding school-to-work transitions. Quality of life and time perception indicators suggest that introducing paid work into young men's schedules is regarded as an overall improvement in their life. Young women, however, seem adversely affected, suggesting that they are more vulnerable to stress induced by schedule conflicts.

    Release date: 2004-02-25
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