Employment and unemployment

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All (19)

All (19) (0 to 10 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111915
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the proportion of employed people aged 25 to 34 with a university degree rose from 19% to 40% among women, and from 17% to 27% among men. Given the increase in the proportion of university graduates, did the occupational profile of young workers change over the period? This article examines long-term changes in the occupation profiles of young men and women, for both those who did and did not have a university degree. Changes in the share of women employed in these occupations are also examined.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111916
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the share of young people with a university degree increased significantly, as did the share of young workers employed in professional occupations. Nevertheless, many young university degree holders could still be considered 'overqualified'-working in occupations requiring lower levels of education. In this article, changes in overqualification among young graduates are examined over the period from 1991 to 2011.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111847
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The social and economic well-being of young people currently generates a lot of interest. Are young people different from previous generations? Do they experience more difficulties in the labour market? Are some doing better than others?

    Release date: 2013-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2012341
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Self-employment has been regarded as an important pathway for many immigrants to engage in the labour market. However, little is known about self-employment among the children of immigrants. Using the 1981 and 2006 Canadian censuses of population and a generational cohort method of analysis, this paper compares the self-employment rates of immigrant parents and the children of immigrant parents when both were 25 to 44 years of age. The focus is on three questions: (1) Are children of immigrants likelier or less likely than immigrant parents to be self-employed?; (2) Are children of immigrants likelier or less likely than children of Canadian-born parents to be self-employed?; (3) Is the generational change in the self-employment rate from immigrant parents to the children of immigrants different from the generational change from Canadian-born parents to their children?

    Release date: 2012-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411593
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Following an economic shock affecting a city or region, many residents - particularly those who have just lost their jobs - will likely look to migrate to another region to improve their economic situation. This study uses data from the 1997 to 2008 Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD) to evaluate the impact of regional economic shocks on the migration of residents. In particular, it examines the extent to which a deterioration in the relative economic position of a region and a decrease in personal income are linked to higher probabilities of migration.

    Release date: 2011-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010713253
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Most Canadians retire by the age of 65. Some, however, continue to work well into their senior years. This article uses census data to study labour market activity among senior men and women. Trends in seniors employment rates and occupational and industrial profiles are outlined. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with employment and work intensity.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110770
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 2006 Census of Canada to look at the use of non-official languages at work among immigrants. Owing to the growing contribution that immigrants are making to Canada's labour force, languages other than English and French are being used more often in Canadian work places. The article examines which languages are used most often. It also looks at the impact of age, gender, year of immigration, education, official language ability and the presence of others who speak the mother tongue in the community where they work, on the likelihood that immigrants will use a non-official language on the job.

    Release date: 2009-01-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008064
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study analyzes the extent to which culture workers were employed outside of culture industries during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2008-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410312
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In recent years, the media have highlighted the particular difficulty of foreign-trained physicians who are unable to practice medicine in Canada. Foreign-trained engineers are another professional group encountering similar difficulties in practicing their profession. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population, this article documents the extent to which foreign trained physicians and engineers are not employed in the occupations for which they studied.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007053
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent of the culture workforce in cities and rural areas across Canada.

    Release date: 2007-09-10
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Analysis (19)

Analysis (19) (0 to 10 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111915
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the proportion of employed people aged 25 to 34 with a university degree rose from 19% to 40% among women, and from 17% to 27% among men. Given the increase in the proportion of university graduates, did the occupational profile of young workers change over the period? This article examines long-term changes in the occupation profiles of young men and women, for both those who did and did not have a university degree. Changes in the share of women employed in these occupations are also examined.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111916
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the share of young people with a university degree increased significantly, as did the share of young workers employed in professional occupations. Nevertheless, many young university degree holders could still be considered 'overqualified'-working in occupations requiring lower levels of education. In this article, changes in overqualification among young graduates are examined over the period from 1991 to 2011.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111847
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The social and economic well-being of young people currently generates a lot of interest. Are young people different from previous generations? Do they experience more difficulties in the labour market? Are some doing better than others?

    Release date: 2013-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2012341
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Self-employment has been regarded as an important pathway for many immigrants to engage in the labour market. However, little is known about self-employment among the children of immigrants. Using the 1981 and 2006 Canadian censuses of population and a generational cohort method of analysis, this paper compares the self-employment rates of immigrant parents and the children of immigrant parents when both were 25 to 44 years of age. The focus is on three questions: (1) Are children of immigrants likelier or less likely than immigrant parents to be self-employed?; (2) Are children of immigrants likelier or less likely than children of Canadian-born parents to be self-employed?; (3) Is the generational change in the self-employment rate from immigrant parents to the children of immigrants different from the generational change from Canadian-born parents to their children?

    Release date: 2012-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411593
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Following an economic shock affecting a city or region, many residents - particularly those who have just lost their jobs - will likely look to migrate to another region to improve their economic situation. This study uses data from the 1997 to 2008 Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD) to evaluate the impact of regional economic shocks on the migration of residents. In particular, it examines the extent to which a deterioration in the relative economic position of a region and a decrease in personal income are linked to higher probabilities of migration.

    Release date: 2011-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010713253
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Most Canadians retire by the age of 65. Some, however, continue to work well into their senior years. This article uses census data to study labour market activity among senior men and women. Trends in seniors employment rates and occupational and industrial profiles are outlined. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with employment and work intensity.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110770
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 2006 Census of Canada to look at the use of non-official languages at work among immigrants. Owing to the growing contribution that immigrants are making to Canada's labour force, languages other than English and French are being used more often in Canadian work places. The article examines which languages are used most often. It also looks at the impact of age, gender, year of immigration, education, official language ability and the presence of others who speak the mother tongue in the community where they work, on the likelihood that immigrants will use a non-official language on the job.

    Release date: 2009-01-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008064
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study analyzes the extent to which culture workers were employed outside of culture industries during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2008-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410312
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In recent years, the media have highlighted the particular difficulty of foreign-trained physicians who are unable to practice medicine in Canada. Foreign-trained engineers are another professional group encountering similar difficulties in practicing their profession. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population, this article documents the extent to which foreign trained physicians and engineers are not employed in the occupations for which they studied.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007053
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent of the culture workforce in cities and rural areas across Canada.

    Release date: 2007-09-10
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