Employment and unemployment

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  • Table: 33-10-0164-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0001)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    This table contains 2736 series, with data starting from 2001 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada) Business dynamics measure (16 items: Number of active employer businesses in the private sector; Number of entrants; Number of incumbents; Number of exits; ...) North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (19 items: Private sector; Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting; Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction; Utilities; ...) Firm size (9 items: Private sector; From 0 to less than 100 employees; From 0 to less than 50 employees; Less than 5 employees; ...).

    Release date: 2019-06-10

  • Table: 36-10-0489-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 383-0031)
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Labour statistics by job category, for Canada, the provinces and territories, annual.

    Release date: 2019-05-22

  • Table: 36-10-0452-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 387-0012)
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Gross domestic product, output and jobs for sport and culture, product perspective, annual.

    Release date: 2019-04-25

  • Table: 36-10-0453-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 387-0013)
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Gross domestic product, output and jobs for sport and culture, industry perspective, annual.

    Release date: 2019-04-25

  • Table: 14-10-0340-02
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Average hourly and median hourly gender wage ratio by National Occupational Classification (NOC), type of work, sex, and age group, last 5 years.

    Release date: 2019-04-09

  • Table: 23-10-0060-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 404-0019)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Annual railway industry employees and employee compensation (average number of employees) by major occupational group (general services, road maintenance, equipment maintenance and transportation).
    Release date: 2019-04-08

  • Table: 23-10-0061-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 404-0020)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Annual railway industry summary statistics on employment, by occupational categories (managerial and supervisory; professional, scientific, technical and staff assistants; clerical; running trades; working foremen; craftsmen, tradesmen, lead hands, service workers and helpers; labourers, including building attendants and coach cleaners) and mainline companies (Canadian National and Canadian Pacific, VIA Rail).
    Release date: 2019-04-08

  • Table: 14-10-0327-01
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Number of persons in the labour force (employment and unemployment) and not in the labour force, unemployment rate, participation rate, and employment rate, by sex and detailed age group, last 5 years.

    Release date: 2019-04-05

  • Table: 14-10-0327-02
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Unemployment rate, participation rate and employment rate for males and females, 15 years and over, by province, current year.

    Release date: 2019-04-05

  • Table: 14-10-0327-03
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Proportion of persons employed full-time and part-time by sex, province and detailed age group, current year.

    Release date: 2019-04-05
Analysis (363)

Analysis (363) (50 to 60 of 363 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011089
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report examines the expectations and labour force outcomes of a recent doctoral graduating class by drawing from two different data sources that surveyed the same individuals at two different points in time. The first is the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED), which interviewed the doctoral graduates at the time of their graduation in 2005. The second source is the National Graduates Survey (NGS), which interviewed them again in 2007.

    The study provides a profile of doctoral holders two years after graduation by examining their demographics and program characteristics as well as their expectations at the time of graduation. It also analyses their mobility patterns, with a particular focus on graduates who moved to the United States. Finally it examines the graduates' labour market outcomes, including employment rates, income, industry and the prevalence of over-qualification as compared to the graduates' expectations.

    Release date: 2011-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201011113260
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article tracks trends in temporary employment since the Labour Force Survey (LFS) began measuring it from 1997 to 2009 with particular attention to the recent economic downturn. It also examines the earnings gap between temporary and permanent positions and looks at whether that gap changed during the recent employment slowdown.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010087
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report examines the link between educational pathways and labour market outcomes of youth from all 5 cycles of the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS-Cohort B). The educational pathways are organized according to three major criteria: (1) No postsecondary education, (2) Direct route to postsecondary education, and (3) Indirect route to postsecondary education. Data from Cycle 5 of YITS, when youth were aged 26 to 28, provide a relatively complete examination of labour market outcomes as rising rates of participation in postsecondary education in Canada have led to a delay in entry into the labour market for many young adults. The current report focuses on two labour market outcomes full-year employment and annual earnings' at two different time points -- 1 to 2 years and 5 to 6 years after respondents have left school on a full-time basis. Results highlight the positive influence of a university education on labour market outcomes, especially several years after leaving school. Moreover, there is some weak evidence to suggest that university graduates who delayed going to a postsecondary program were more likely than their counterparts who had not delayed to be employed several years after leaving school.

    Release date: 2010-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010913256
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines long-term trends in employment for postsecondary students. The rate of employment, hours of work and employment earnings of male and female students are covered. How other student characteristics relate to employment is also addressed. Particular attention is paid to student employment during labour market downturns.

    Release date: 2010-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010713253
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Most Canadians retire by the age of 65. Some, however, continue to work well into their senior years. This article uses census data to study labour market activity among senior men and women. Trends in seniors employment rates and occupational and industrial profiles are outlined. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with employment and work intensity.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010084
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The successful integration of immigrants into the Canadian labour market is of interest to Canadian public policy and to current and potential immigrants, alike. Using data from the 2006 Census of Population, this report aims to develop a better understanding of the integration of internationally-trained educated immigrants into the Canadian labour market compared to those (Canadian-born or other immigrants) who completed their education in Canada i.e., Are they working in an occupation related to their field of study or in an equivalent occupation? What are their working conditions and earnings? In doing so, this report presents a socio-demographic profile of internationally-educated immigrants upon their arrival in Canada and examines their labour market outcomes by time elapsed since landing.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Employment in manufacturing in Canada has fluctuated over recent decades. The level reached a historically high in 2004 and has been declining since that time.

    In 2008, over one-half (54%) of all Canadian manufacturing workers were employed in the value chain of a resource sector.

    In 2008, resource sector manufacturing employment was relatively more important in rural and small town areas (69% of manufacturing employment and 9% of total employment) compared to larger urban centres (50% of manufacturing employment and 6% of total employment).

    In the 2001 to 2008 period, resource manufacturing employment became a larger share of total manufacturing employment (up from 51% to 54%) because resource manufacturing employment declined less (-6%) compared to the decline of all 'other' manufacturing employment (-18%).

    Also, in the 2001 to 2008 period, resource manufacturing employment become relatively more important in rural and small town areas as the decline (-3%) was smaller in rural and small town areas compared to the decline in larger urban centres (-7%).

    Within rural and small town areas at the Canada level, 9% of total employment in 2008 was resource sector manufacturing employment. This ranged from 14% within the rural and small town areas of Quebec to 2% within the rural and small town areas of Saskatchewan.

    Within rural and small town areas in 2008, employment in wood processing accounted for the largest share of resource sector manufacturing employment (43%).

    Release date: 2010-08-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010313245
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    During the recent employment downturn, self-employment was one source of employment growth. This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine the sources and characteristics of the recent increase in self-employment, the dynamics of entry into and exit out of self-employment, and to assess the extent to which those who lost paid jobs early in the recession might account for the subsequent surge in self-employment.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010513249
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the Labour Force Survey, this article examines the evolution of the employment rate and work hours of wives whose husbands suffered job loss during the last three labour market downturns: 1981 to 1983, 1990 to 1992 and 2008 to 2009.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911211048
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canadian labour market recently experienced its worst downturn since the recession of the early 1990s. Since employment last peaked in October 2008, employment declined by 2.3%, or 400,000 individuals. This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine variations in employment levels from October 2008 to October 2009 across a variety of personal and job characteristics. Comparisons are also made with earlier recessions and the U.S. labour market.

    Release date: 2010-03-23
Reference (5)

Reference (5) ((5 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X200800110614
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) produces monthly estimates of the unemployment rate at national and provincial levels. The LFS also releases unemployment estimates for sub-provincial areas such as Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) and Urban Centers (UCs). However, for some sub-provincial areas, the direct estimates are not reliable since the sample size in some areas is quite small. The small area estimation in LFS concerns estimation of unemployment rates for local sub-provincial areas such as CMA/UCs using small area models. In this paper, we will discuss various models including the Fay-Herriot model and cross-sectional and time series models. In particular, an integrated non-linear mixed effects model will be proposed under the hierarchical Bayes (HB) framework for the LFS unemployment rate estimation. Monthly Employment Insurance (EI) beneficiary data at the CMA/UC level are used as auxiliary covariates in the model. A HB approach with the Gibbs sampling method is used to obtain the estimates of posterior means and posterior variances of the CMA/UC level unemployment rates. The proposed HB model leads to reliable model-based estimates in terms of CV reduction. Model fit analysis and comparison of the model-based estimates with the direct estimates are presented in the paper.

    Release date: 2008-06-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004022
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This activity focuses on the contribution of immigrants to Canadian agriculture, highlighting which countries they come from and why, and what types of farms they prefer.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-001-X19960042907
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The employment/population ratio is a good barometer of the state of the economy and an important though little-used labour market indicator. This article takes a look at the ratio's strengths and limitations, as well as its variation since 1946. Provincial and international comparisons are included.

    Release date: 1996-12-03

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11F0019M1995083
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the robustness of a measure of the average complete duration of unemployment in Canada to a host of assumptions used in its derivation. In contrast to the average incomplete duration of unemployment, which is a lagging cyclical indicator, this statistic is a coincident indicator of the business cycle. The impact of using a steady state as opposed to a non steady state assumption, as well as the impact of various corrections for response bias are explored. It is concluded that a non steady state estimator would be a valuable compliment to the statistics on unemployment duration that are currently released by many statistical agencies, and particularly Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-001-X1992004140
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study illustrates quarterly trends in unemployment rates based on alternative measures. By all of the indicators studies there was an overall increase in unemployment during the early 1990s.

    Release date: 1992-12-01
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