Employment and unemployment

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All (26)

All (26) (0 to 10 of 26 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100004
    Description:

    In this study, data from the Demosim microsimulation model are used to assess the labour force participation rate of Canadians in 2036 under various scenarios of population growth and participation rate by age. In addition, the article provides an overview of the ethnocultural characteristics of persons who will be in the labour market in 2036, as well as an overview of regional differences that could exist in the labour force in 2036.

    Release date: 2019-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100001
    Description:

    In this study, data from the 2016 Census are used to provide a sociodemographic profile of the Syrian refugees who resettled in Canada between January 1, 2015, and May 10, 2016, and who were still living in Canada at the time of the census. This article also analyses the labour market participation of Syrian refugees, and provides some information about their housing conditions.

    Release date: 2019-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019002
    Description:

    Rising income inequality in industrialized nations has motivated research on high-income Canadians and how they differ from the general population. Despite notable advancements in education and labour force participation over the last half century, women continue to be less represented relative to men among top income groups, accounting for one in five workers in Canada’s top 1% in 2015. This paper fills an important information gap by providing a gender-based analysis of key socio-demographic and employment characteristics of working women and men in the top 1%, based on the 2016 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2019-01-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154976
    Description:

    Using data from the Canadian Vital Statistics Birth Database and from the Labour Force Survey (LFS), this study examines the relationship between fertility rates and labour force participation among women aged 15 to 44 in Ontario and in Quebec between 1996 and 2016, two provinces that followed different paths with respect to parental leave benefits and affordable child care over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2018-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114640
    Description:

    Women have become increasingly well-educated, and today their share in the Canadian labour market is larger than ever. This chapter of Women in Canada examines women’s educational experiences, with a focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics and computer science) education and skills. Topics include a profile of women’s education in Canada, the skills of young girls and women, field-of-study patterns at the postsecondary level, and labour market outcomes, including earnings.

    Release date: 2016-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111915
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the proportion of employed people aged 25 to 34 with a university degree rose from 19% to 40% among women, and from 17% to 27% among men. Given the increase in the proportion of university graduates, did the occupational profile of young workers change over the period? This article examines long-term changes in the occupation profiles of young men and women, for both those who did and did not have a university degree. Changes in the share of women employed in these occupations are also examined.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111916
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the share of young people with a university degree increased significantly, as did the share of young workers employed in professional occupations. Nevertheless, many young university degree holders could still be considered 'overqualified'-working in occupations requiring lower levels of education. In this article, changes in overqualification among young graduates are examined over the period from 1991 to 2011.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111847
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The social and economic well-being of young people currently generates a lot of interest. Are young people different from previous generations? Do they experience more difficulties in the labour market? Are some doing better than others?

    Release date: 2013-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2012341
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Self-employment has been regarded as an important pathway for many immigrants to engage in the labour market. However, little is known about self-employment among the children of immigrants. Using the 1981 and 2006 Canadian censuses of population and a generational cohort method of analysis, this paper compares the self-employment rates of immigrant parents and the children of immigrant parents when both were 25 to 44 years of age. The focus is on three questions: (1) Are children of immigrants likelier or less likely than immigrant parents to be self-employed?; (2) Are children of immigrants likelier or less likely than children of Canadian-born parents to be self-employed?; (3) Is the generational change in the self-employment rate from immigrant parents to the children of immigrants different from the generational change from Canadian-born parents to their children?

    Release date: 2012-04-16
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Analysis (26)

Analysis (26) (0 to 10 of 26 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100004
    Description:

    In this study, data from the Demosim microsimulation model are used to assess the labour force participation rate of Canadians in 2036 under various scenarios of population growth and participation rate by age. In addition, the article provides an overview of the ethnocultural characteristics of persons who will be in the labour market in 2036, as well as an overview of regional differences that could exist in the labour force in 2036.

    Release date: 2019-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100001
    Description:

    In this study, data from the 2016 Census are used to provide a sociodemographic profile of the Syrian refugees who resettled in Canada between January 1, 2015, and May 10, 2016, and who were still living in Canada at the time of the census. This article also analyses the labour market participation of Syrian refugees, and provides some information about their housing conditions.

    Release date: 2019-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019002
    Description:

    Rising income inequality in industrialized nations has motivated research on high-income Canadians and how they differ from the general population. Despite notable advancements in education and labour force participation over the last half century, women continue to be less represented relative to men among top income groups, accounting for one in five workers in Canada’s top 1% in 2015. This paper fills an important information gap by providing a gender-based analysis of key socio-demographic and employment characteristics of working women and men in the top 1%, based on the 2016 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2019-01-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154976
    Description:

    Using data from the Canadian Vital Statistics Birth Database and from the Labour Force Survey (LFS), this study examines the relationship between fertility rates and labour force participation among women aged 15 to 44 in Ontario and in Quebec between 1996 and 2016, two provinces that followed different paths with respect to parental leave benefits and affordable child care over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2018-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114640
    Description:

    Women have become increasingly well-educated, and today their share in the Canadian labour market is larger than ever. This chapter of Women in Canada examines women’s educational experiences, with a focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics and computer science) education and skills. Topics include a profile of women’s education in Canada, the skills of young girls and women, field-of-study patterns at the postsecondary level, and labour market outcomes, including earnings.

    Release date: 2016-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111915
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the proportion of employed people aged 25 to 34 with a university degree rose from 19% to 40% among women, and from 17% to 27% among men. Given the increase in the proportion of university graduates, did the occupational profile of young workers change over the period? This article examines long-term changes in the occupation profiles of young men and women, for both those who did and did not have a university degree. Changes in the share of women employed in these occupations are also examined.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111916
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the share of young people with a university degree increased significantly, as did the share of young workers employed in professional occupations. Nevertheless, many young university degree holders could still be considered 'overqualified'-working in occupations requiring lower levels of education. In this article, changes in overqualification among young graduates are examined over the period from 1991 to 2011.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111847
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The social and economic well-being of young people currently generates a lot of interest. Are young people different from previous generations? Do they experience more difficulties in the labour market? Are some doing better than others?

    Release date: 2013-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2012341
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Self-employment has been regarded as an important pathway for many immigrants to engage in the labour market. However, little is known about self-employment among the children of immigrants. Using the 1981 and 2006 Canadian censuses of population and a generational cohort method of analysis, this paper compares the self-employment rates of immigrant parents and the children of immigrant parents when both were 25 to 44 years of age. The focus is on three questions: (1) Are children of immigrants likelier or less likely than immigrant parents to be self-employed?; (2) Are children of immigrants likelier or less likely than children of Canadian-born parents to be self-employed?; (3) Is the generational change in the self-employment rate from immigrant parents to the children of immigrants different from the generational change from Canadian-born parents to their children?

    Release date: 2012-04-16
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