Employment and unemployment

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  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2018081
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, earnings and housing market activity in British Columbia. Highlighting the contribution of real estate and residential construction to economic growth, the paper focuses on strength since 2014. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on May 2, 2018.

    Release date: 2018-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007293
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    In recent years, differences in working hours between Canada and other countries have been the focus of a substantial body of research. Much less attention has been paid to regional differences in work hours, although differences in average annual work hours between some regions are of an order of magnitude that is similar to that of the Canada-U.S. difference. Using data from the 2004 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, this study examines how much of differences in working time between Ontario and five other regions of Canada can be explained by 'observable' differences, including differences in union status, industrial structure, job conditions and demographic characteristics. 'Observables' were relatively efficient in explaining differences in the shares of individuals working a short year and working a full-year, full-time schedule. However, they were not very helpful in explaining differences in long work hours, did not entirely explain the larger share of short-year workers in the Atlantic and in British Columbia, and did not explain the huge popularity of the 'low' full-year, full-time schedule in Quebec. These differences that remain unexplained suggest that 'unobservable' factors (those that are difficult to observe in household surveys) also contribute to regional differences in work hours. These include incentives related to wage inequality, possible tax incentives (or disincentives) built upon progressive taxation policies, differences in job conditions, in preferences and tastes, and in the shape of institutions.

    Release date: 2007-01-22
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  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2018081
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, earnings and housing market activity in British Columbia. Highlighting the contribution of real estate and residential construction to economic growth, the paper focuses on strength since 2014. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on May 2, 2018.

    Release date: 2018-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007293
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    In recent years, differences in working hours between Canada and other countries have been the focus of a substantial body of research. Much less attention has been paid to regional differences in work hours, although differences in average annual work hours between some regions are of an order of magnitude that is similar to that of the Canada-U.S. difference. Using data from the 2004 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, this study examines how much of differences in working time between Ontario and five other regions of Canada can be explained by 'observable' differences, including differences in union status, industrial structure, job conditions and demographic characteristics. 'Observables' were relatively efficient in explaining differences in the shares of individuals working a short year and working a full-year, full-time schedule. However, they were not very helpful in explaining differences in long work hours, did not entirely explain the larger share of short-year workers in the Atlantic and in British Columbia, and did not explain the huge popularity of the 'low' full-year, full-time schedule in Quebec. These differences that remain unexplained suggest that 'unobservable' factors (those that are difficult to observe in household surveys) also contribute to regional differences in work hours. These include incentives related to wage inequality, possible tax incentives (or disincentives) built upon progressive taxation policies, differences in job conditions, in preferences and tastes, and in the shape of institutions.

    Release date: 2007-01-22
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