Employment and unemployment

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All (511)

All (511) (70 to 80 of 511 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016062
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article highlights the slower pace of earnings growth for Canada as a whole during 2015 and the first half of 2016. It focuses on the impact that lower average earnings in Alberta during this period have had on earnings growth at the national level. The contribution of different industries to lower average earnings in Alberta is examined.

    Release date: 2016-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016061
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during late 2015 and early 2016. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on November 4, 2016.

    Release date: 2016-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2016100
    Description:

    Local level manufacturing data can be used to examine manufacturing structure at the Census Metropolitan Areas (CMA) level and differences in their manufacturing activities. This paper developed and analyzes an experimental local-level manufacturing database containing sales and employment information for 11 (CMA) in Canada for the period 2007 to 2012.

    Release date: 2016-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114655
    Description:

    Based on a self-reported measure of overqualification, this article examines the association between overqualification and skills among workers aged 25 to 64 with a university degree, using data from the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). This article also examines the extent to which overqualified workers are dissatisfied with their jobs. Overqualified workers are defined in this study as university-educated workers who reported that they were in a job requiring no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2016-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114651
    Description:

    This study reports on the trends in the labour force participation rate (LFPR) of prime-aged women (25 to 54) in both Canada and the United States. The paper examines the population groups that have been behind the rising divergence in the LFPR between the two countries over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114640
    Description:

    Women have become increasingly well-educated, and today their share in the Canadian labour market is larger than ever. This chapter of Women in Canada examines women’s educational experiences, with a focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics and computer science) education and skills. Topics include a profile of women’s education in Canada, the skills of young girls and women, field-of-study patterns at the postsecondary level, and labour market outcomes, including earnings.

    Release date: 2016-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016060
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article presents annual estimates of hiring rates and layoff rates for Canada’s 69 economic regions (ERs) for the 2003-to-2013 period. It addresses several questions: (1) To what extent do hiring rates and layoff rates differ across Canada’s ERs? (2) What is the profile of ERs that display relatively low or relatively high layoff rates? (3) To what extent did the 2008/2009 recession affect hiring rates and layoff rates in various ERs? The study uses data from the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD) to examine these issues. Attention is restricted to employees who were aged 18 to 64. Employees are defined as individuals with wages and salaries but no self-employment income in a given year. Incorporated self-employed individuals are excluded. A longer, more detailed study is also available.

    Release date: 2016-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016001
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of workers lose their jobs as firms reduce the size of their workforce in response to growing competition, technological changes, changing trade patterns and numerous other factors. Thousands of workers also start a job with a new employer as new firms enter a product market and existing firms expand or replace employees who recently left. This worker reallocation process across employers is generally seen as contributing to productivity growth and rising living standards. To measure this labour reallocation process, labour market indicators such as hiring rates and layoff rates are needed. In response to growing demand for subprovincial labour market information and taking advantage of unique administrative datasets, Statistics Canada is producing hiring rates and layoff rates by economic region of residence. This document describes the data sources, conceptual and methodological issues, and other matters pertaining to these two indicators.

    Release date: 2016-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114630
    Description:

    This article examines the literacy and numeracy skills of off reserve First Nations and Métis adults aged 25 to 65, focusing on the factors and labour market outcomes associated with higher skill levels. In this study, individuals in the higher range for literacy and numeracy are defined as those who scored level 3 or higher (out of 5 levels) in tests administered by the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).

    Release date: 2016-05-18
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Analysis (511)

Analysis (511) (30 to 40 of 511 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019002
    Description:

    Rising income inequality in industrialized nations has motivated research on high-income Canadians and how they differ from the general population. Despite notable advancements in education and labour force participation over the last half century, women continue to be less represented relative to men among top income groups, accounting for one in five workers in Canada’s top 1% in 2015. This paper fills an important information gap by providing a gender-based analysis of key socio-demographic and employment characteristics of working women and men in the top 1%, based on the 2016 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2019-01-21

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201900100001
    Description:

    This article is Statistics Canada’s first-ever publication on Aboriginal peoples and agriculture. It explores the part that Aboriginal persons play in the agricultural population in 2016. It examines how Aboriginal farm operators resemble or differ from their non-Aboriginal farm operator counterparts, and how likely they are to be engaged in off-farm paid employment. It also discusses the most common farm types for Aboriginal farm operators.

    Release date: 2019-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2018001
    Description:

    This report uses immigrant data series from the Labour Force Survey to provide a description of immigrants' labour-market outcomes, from 2006 to 2017.

    Release date: 2018-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 71-222-X2018003
    Description:

    Using data from the Labour Force Survey, this analysis provides new information on the labour force participation of older Canadians, defined in this analysis as persons aged 60 years and older, by shedding light on the reasons why they were working.

    Release date: 2018-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2018086
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of long-term changes in several characteristics of the jobs held by Canadian employees. The article assesses the evolution of median real hourly wages in all jobs, full-time jobs and part-time jobs, as well as the evolution of layoff rates. It also examines changes in the percentage of jobs that are full-time; permanent; full-time and permanent; unionized; in public administration, educational services, health care and social assistance; covered by a registered pension plan (RPP); and covered by a defined-benefit RPP. Unless otherwise noted, statistics are shown for the main job held by employees in May and cover the period from 1981 to 2018. The main job is the job with the most weekly work hours. Full-time jobs involve 30 hours or more per week.

    Release date: 2018-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-654-X2018002
    Description:

    This profile article is the first main release by Statistics Canada based on findings from the 2017 Canadian Survey on Disability. It is divided into three sections - demographics, employment, and income - and provides a general snapshot on persons with disabilities to inform on emerging government priorities (such as Opportunity for All: Canada's First Poverty Reduction Strategy; Government of Canada, 2018) and community interest in the areas of disability prevalence, labour market participation, and income inequality.

    Release date: 2018-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2018002
    Description:

    This booklet provides key findings related to labour market experiences of Métis based on data from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). Sections are divided according to labour force status. Among employed Métis, the prevalence of and reasons for part-time employment, self-employment and participation in other labour activities are explored among other aspects. Among unemployed Métis, barriers and facilitators of employment, and means of looking for work are described. Among those not in the labour force, the reasons for non-participation among those who wanted to work, and facilitators to finding work among those expecting to enter the labour force are outlined. Finally, job-related skills and access to job-related training are described.

    This booklet also briefly describes how the APS allows deeper exploration of concepts derived from the Census of Population, and broad topics for which data is available from the survey.

    Release date: 2018-11-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2018003
    Description:

    This booklet provides key findings related to labour market experiences of First Nations people based on data from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). Sections are divided according to labour force status. Among employed First Nations people, the prevalence of and reasons for part-time employment, self-employment and participation in other labour activities are explored among other aspects. Among unemployed First Nations people, barriers and facilitators of employment, and means of looking for work are described. Among those not in the labour force, the reasons for non-participation among those who wanted to work, and facilitators to finding work among those expecting to enter the labour force are outlined. Finally, job-related skills and access to job-related training are described.

    This booklet also briefly describes how the APS allows deeper exploration of concepts derived from the Census of Population, and broad topics for which data is available from the survey.

    Release date: 2018-11-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2018004
    Description:

    This booklet provides key findings related to labour market experiences of Inuit based on data from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). Sections are divided according to labour force status. Among employed Inuit, the prevalence of and reasons for part-time employment, self-employment and participation in other labour activities are explored among other aspects. Among unemployed Inuit, barriers and facilitators of employment, and means of looking for work are described. Among those not in the labour force, the reasons for non-participation among those who wanted to work, and facilitators to finding work among those expecting to enter the labour force are outlined. Finally, job-related skills and access to job-related training are described.

    This booklet also briefly describes how the APS allows deeper exploration of concepts derived from the Census of Population, and broad topics for which data is available from the survey.

    Release date: 2018-11-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2018001
    Description:

    This study draws on data from the Longitudinal Immigration Database to examine participation in Canadian post-secondary education (PSE) among adult immigrants in the 2002-2005 landing cohort, with an explicit focus on resettled refugees. The study describes the demographic characteristics of participants, the qualities of participation, and the economic returns on investment in Canadian PSE. It also employs multivariate regression analysis to further examine the effects of participation in Canadian training on employment incidence and the income of those employed, while controlling for other factors associated with successful economic integration.

    Release date: 2018-11-14
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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024349
    Description:

    Measurement of gross flows in labour force status is an important objective of the continuing labour force surveys carried out by many national statistics agencies. However, it is well known that estimation of these flows can be complicated by nonresponse, measurement errors, sample rotation and complex design effects. Motivated by nonresponse patterns in household-based surveys, this paper focuses on estimation of labour force gross flows, while simultaneously adjusting for nonignorable nonresponse. Previous model-based approaches to gross flows estimation have assumed nonresponse to be an individual-level process. We propose a class of models that allow for nonignorable household-level nonresponse. A simulation study is used to show, that individual-level labour force gross flows estimates from household-based survey data, may be biased and that estimates using household-level models can offer a reduction in this bias.

    Release date: 1999-01-14
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