Employment and unemployment

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  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19900012290
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many analysts see high technology industries as the way to a healthy and wealthy economy. This article reviews some of the concepts and definitions of high technology, selects one definition and examines the 1977 to 1986 employment and earnings dynamics in these industries.

    Release date: 1990-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19900012293
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study of 1982 graduates from Canadian universities and community colleges follows their fortunes in the labour market up to 1987. It compares the earnings of graduates in various disciplines and looks at their patterns of inter-provincial mobility.

    Release date: 1990-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19900012295
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Calculating an unemployment rate based on unutilized hours offers a more complete measure of unemployment. It also results in a higher rate of unemployment. This study provides a look at what else this measure can tell us.

    Release date: 1990-01-26

  • 494. Moonlighters Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042285
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the average week of 1988, over a half a million people worked at two or more jobs. This study shows that some groups of workers - the young, the self-employed - are especially disposed to moonlighting. Family circumstances, hours of work and earnings between single and multiple jobholders are examined.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

  • 495. Disabled workers Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042286
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    There were nearly 400,000 disabled workers in Canada in 1986 - less than a third of working age Canadians with a disability. What are the characteristics of disabled workers? This study compares disabled workers with the non-disabled in the work force and with disabled persons outside of the work force.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042287
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Immigrant workers are over-represented in "product fabricating" occupations, which include, for example, garment workers and mechanics. This profile of immigrants in fabricating jobs looks at age, education, period of immigration and knowledge of English or French. It also compared the employment income of immigrant and non-immigrant workers in product fabricating occupations.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890042288
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Unemployment estimates from the Labour Force Survey, source of the official unemployment rate, are quite different from counts of the number of Unemployment Insurance beneficiaries. This piece reviews the conceptual differences between the two data sources and quantifies many of the factors that create the discrepancies.

    Release date: 1989-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890032279
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Employment growth moderated considerably this year, and shifted its focus westward: more than half the growth occurred in British Columbia. An up-to-date look at labour market developments in the first six months of 1989.

    Release date: 1989-09-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890032280
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Trade unionism is adapting, as the service sector and women's share of employment expand. This study looks at unionization among women in the service sector during the 1980s. Trends by occupation and industry are examined for full-time and part-time workers, as are the earnings of unionized and non-unionized workers.

    Release date: 1989-09-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19890032282
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Help-wanted Index measures job ads as an indicator of labour demand. The index is considered a leading indicator of labour market conditions and of general economic activity. This study looks at the performance of the index during the last three business cycles.

    Release date: 1989-09-30
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Analysis (503)

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  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017075
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the first two quarters of 2017 and into the summer months. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on October 6, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017396
    Description:

    Temporary foreign workers (TFWs) are an important source of labour supply in Canada. Their transition to permanent residence may have important economic consequences, particularly in their employment and earnings trajectories. The effect of the status change may vary across different streams of TFWs who enter Canada under different terms and conditions. Hence, whether the labour market outcomes of TFWs change substantially or not after they acquire permanent residence is an empirical question. Using a unique administrative dataset, this study investigates the employment and earnings trajectories of temporary foreign workers (TFWs) during the years surrounding their acquisition of permanent residence in Canada.

    Release date: 2017-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2017004
    Description:

    This month’s edition of Canadian Megatrends looks at labour force participation, unemployment, full-time and part-time work, and real wages for young workers in Canada from 1946 to 2015.

    Release date: 2017-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114824
    Description:

    In this paper, multiple sources of data are used to study the profile and labour market outcomes of young men and women aged 25 to 34 without a high school diploma. The data sources include the Labour Force Survey (LFS), the Canadian Income Survey (CIS) and the Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD).

    Release date: 2017-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2017001
    Description:

    The Annual Review of the Labour Market analyses recent trends on a yearly basis using data from a variety of sources such as the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours, the Employment Insurance Statistics Program, and the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey. The focus is on trends at the national level, although some selected trends will be examined at the provincial level.

    Release date: 2017-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017072
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the second half of 2016 and early 2017. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 71-588-X2017001
    Description:

    This report provides an up-to-date overview of the labour market involvement of the off-reserve Aboriginal population in Canada's ten provinces during and after the 2008/2009 economic downturn, as compared to the non-Aboriginal population. Using annual averages from the Labour Force Survey (LFS), covering the period of 2007 to 2015, the main focus is on Aboriginal people in the core working ages (25 to 54 years), although youth (aged 15 to 24 years) and older adults (aged 55 years and older) are considered separately. In addition to Aboriginal group, labour market indicators are distinguished by gender, geography (province/region of residence), education, lone parenthood, and marital status. The distribution of work characteristics (e.g., self-employment, sector of employment, usual work hours, wages, job tenure, industry, and occupation) by Aboriginal group are also explored.

    Release date: 2017-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114694
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines women's labour market experiences in comparison to those of men and, where relevant, explores how they have evolved over time. Specifically, historical trends in participation, employment, and unemployment rates are documented. Then, using the most recent data available, employment patterns across a variety of personal and work characteristics are considered: province; educational attainment; marital status; parental status and age of youngest child/ren in the household; lone parenthood; work hours; self-employment; sector of employment (i.e., public or private); "precarious" (i.e., part-time and/or temporary) employment; industry; and occupation. Gender wage differentials are also explored within and between educational and occupational groups. Turning to unemployment, patterns by age, province, and reasons for job leaving/losing are considered, along with Employment Insurance claims and beneficiaries.

    Most analyses in this chapter focus on women (and men) in the core working ages of 25 to 54 years, as younger people's (15-24 years) labour market experiences are shaped by school attendance, and older people's (55 years and older) are shaped by retirement. However, gender differences in labour market indicators among youth and mature adults are considered separately at the end.

    Release date: 2017-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017390
    Description:

    Programs in the economic stream of immigration select immigrants for their perceived ability to integrate into the Canadian labour market. However, it is mainly the principal applicants, mostly men, who are assessed. They in turn bring with them spouses and dependent children. This study examines the characteristics and labour market outcomes of women who arrived as spouses of economic immigrant principal applicants. Their characteristics and outcomes are compared with those of other economic immigrants (male and female principal applicants and male spouses) and with married women who arrived in the family class.

    This study is based on data from the linked 2011 National Household Survey and the Immigrant Landing File database. The focus is on economic immigrants who arrived as skilled workers, provincial nominees, or in the Canadian experience class.

    Release date: 2017-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017389
    Description:

    The number of temporary foreign workers in Canada increased considerably from the early 1990s. Temporary foreign workers over this period also became an increasingly important source of permanent residents admitted to Canada. Using the Temporary Residents file and the Immigrant Landing File, this article documents the changes in the levels and types of new temporary foreign workers who arrived in Canada from 1990 to 2014. It further examines the patterns of transition from temporary foreign workers to permanent residents, and the immigration classes through which temporary foreign workers obtained permanent residence.

    Release date: 2017-02-21
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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024349
    Description:

    Measurement of gross flows in labour force status is an important objective of the continuing labour force surveys carried out by many national statistics agencies. However, it is well known that estimation of these flows can be complicated by nonresponse, measurement errors, sample rotation and complex design effects. Motivated by nonresponse patterns in household-based surveys, this paper focuses on estimation of labour force gross flows, while simultaneously adjusting for nonignorable nonresponse. Previous model-based approaches to gross flows estimation have assumed nonresponse to be an individual-level process. We propose a class of models that allow for nonignorable household-level nonresponse. A simulation study is used to show, that individual-level labour force gross flows estimates from household-based survey data, may be biased and that estimates using household-level models can offer a reduction in this bias.

    Release date: 1999-01-14
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