Employment and unemployment

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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114630
    Description:

    This article examines the literacy and numeracy skills of off reserve First Nations and Métis adults aged 25 to 65, focusing on the factors and labour market outcomes associated with higher skill levels. In this study, individuals in the higher range for literacy and numeracy are defined as those who scored level 3 or higher (out of 5 levels) in tests administered by the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).

    Release date: 2016-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016058
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during late 2015 and early 2016. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 29, 2016.

    Release date: 2016-05-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016055
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents differences in labour market participation observed between immigrant wives and Canadian-born wives over the 2006-to-2014 period. It also assesses the degree to which the lower participation of immigrant wives, as compared with their Canadian-born counterparts, can be accounted for by differences in socioeconomic characteristics, such as family size, weekly wages of husbands, and labour force participation in the source country. The study uses the Labour Force Survey and World Bank indicators on source-country characteristics to examine these issues. Attention is restricted to Canadian-born women and landed immigrant women aged 25 to 54 who are married (or living in common-law relationships) with husbands aged 25 to 54 who are employed as paid workers. For simplicity, the terms ‘husbands’ and ‘wives’ are used to refer to men and women who are married or in common-law relationships.

    Release date: 2016-01-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-654-X2015005
    Description:

    Using data from the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD), this report examines the labour market experiences of people with disabilities. The CSD data offer opportunities for analysis of disability-specific aspects of employment, such as barriers encountered by people with disabilities, workplace accommodations needed and whether those needs are met, perceptions of disability-related discrimination in the work environment, and labour force discouragement among those who are neither working nor looking for work. This report aims to provide information to employers, and to spark further research in the area of disability and employment.

    Release date: 2015-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015053
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during first two quarters of 2015 and into the summer months. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on November 5, 2015.

    Release date: 2015-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-005-M2015002
    Description:

    This report provides information to users who wish to compare employment and unemployment estimates from the Canadian surveys (LFS and SEPH) and American surveys (CPS and CES). The aspects covered include concepts, methods, seasonal adjustment, timeliness, revisions and main uses.

    Release date: 2015-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015049
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article addresses three questions: (1) How has the full-time employment rate - the percentage of the population employed full time - evolved since the mid-1970s overall? (2) How has the full-time employment rate changed across age groups, education levels, sex, and regions? (3) To what extent have movements in full-time employment rates been driven by changes in the socio-demographic characteristics of Canadians and by changes in labour market participation rates, unemployment rates, and part-time employment rates?

    Release date: 2015-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015047
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents an overview of interprovincial paid employment over the 2002-to-2011 period. Interprovincial workers are individuals who maintain a permanent residence in a given province or territory but work in another. The results are based on Statistics Canada’s Canadian Employer-Employee Dynamics Database and pertain to employees aged 18 or older who earned at least $1,000 in 2002 dollars.

    Release date: 2015-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114202
    Description:

    This paper examines the employment patterns of families with children (under the age of 16) over the period from 1976 to 2014, with a particular focus on couple families with children. This article also highlights regional differences in the working patterns of parents, and provides additional information on the employment patterns of lone parents.

    Release date: 2015-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114155
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), this study examines whether the expected retirement age varies according to the unemployment rate of the economic region. In addition, the study verifies if the relationship between the unemployment rate of the economic region and the probability of permanent retirement remains when other factors are accounted for.

    Release date: 2015-04-22
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Analysis (512)

Analysis (512) (460 to 470 of 512 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011776
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The automotive industry comprises not only the manufacture or assembly of automotive parts and vehicles, but also the distribution, servicing and maintenance of the finished products. This article looks at the workforce involved in this important industry.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011778
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Immigration is a major source of new workers. This article profiles Canada's "newest" workers and compares their characteristics with those of Canadian-born workers.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011780
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    When productivity increases in a sector, does it mean employment growth? This article explores the question and introduces a new concept: multifactor productivity.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011781
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A summary of the one-day Symposium on the Greying of the Workforce, which explored the myths and realities of the situation facing older workers, as well as the implications for the coming decades.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041562
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    David Foot on the baby boom generation's influence on current and future forms of organizational structure in North America.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041582
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    An overview of the changing industrial structure in the census metropolitan areas of Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver since 1971.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994069
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Employment equity legislation is becoming more prevalent in Canadian labour markets, yet -- other than broad availability numbers -- the labour market experiencesof designated groups have not been well documented. Using the National Graduates Survey of 1992, this report profiles the early labour market experiences ofvisible minorities, Aboriginal peoples and persons with disabilities who graduated from Canadian universities and community colleges in 1990. In general, we find thatthe earnings of designated group members are very similar to the earnings of their classmates. However, we also find that members of these groups are more likely tobe unemployed and are less likely to participate in the labour force than others in their class.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994070
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses job turnover data to compare how job creation, job destruction and net job change differ for small and large establishments in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It uses several different techniques to correct for the regression-to-the-mean problem that, it has been suggested, might incorrectly lead to the conclusion that small establishments create a disproportionate number of new jobs. It finds that net job creation for smaller establishments is greater than that of large establishments after such changes are made. The paper also compares the importance of small and large establishments in the manufacturing sectors of Canada and the United States. The Canadian manufacturing sector is shown to have both a larger proportion of employment in smaller establishments but also to have a small establishment sector that is growing in importance relative to that of the United States.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994071
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The statistical observation that small firms have created the majority of new jobs during the 1980s has had a tremendous influence on public policy. Governmentshave looked to the small firm sector for employment growth, and have promoted policies to augment this expansion. However, recent research in the US suggeststhat net job creation in the small firm sector may have been overestimated, relative to that in large firms. This paper addresses various measurement issues raised inthe recent research, and uses a very unique Canadian longitudinal data set that encompasses all companies in the Canadian economy to reassess the issue of jobcreation by firm size. We conclude that over the 1978-92 period, for both the entire Canadian economy and the manufacturing sector, the growth rate of (net)employment decreases monotonically as the size of firm increases, no matter which method of sizing firms is used. The small firm sector has accounted for adisproportionate share of both gross job gains and job losses, and in that aggregate, accounted for a disproportionate share of the employment increase over theperiod. Measurement does matter, however, as the magnitude of the difference in the growth rates of small and large firms is very sensitive to the measurementapproaches used. The paper also produces results for various industrial sectors, asks whether the more rapid growth in industries with a high proportion of smallfirms is responsible for the findings at the all-economy level, and examines employment growth in existing small and large firms (ie excluding births). It is found thatemployment growth in the population of existing small and large firms is very similar.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • 470. Jobs! Jobs! Jobs! Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X1994003127
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1975 and 1993, part-time jobs grew much faster than full-time jobs. The article examines the labour market by looking at jobs rather than workers

    Release date: 1994-09-06
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024349
    Description:

    Measurement of gross flows in labour force status is an important objective of the continuing labour force surveys carried out by many national statistics agencies. However, it is well known that estimation of these flows can be complicated by nonresponse, measurement errors, sample rotation and complex design effects. Motivated by nonresponse patterns in household-based surveys, this paper focuses on estimation of labour force gross flows, while simultaneously adjusting for nonignorable nonresponse. Previous model-based approaches to gross flows estimation have assumed nonresponse to be an individual-level process. We propose a class of models that allow for nonignorable household-level nonresponse. A simulation study is used to show, that individual-level labour force gross flows estimates from household-based survey data, may be biased and that estimates using household-level models can offer a reduction in this bias.

    Release date: 1999-01-14
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