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All (513) (10 to 20 of 513 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100015
    Description:

    Previous research has suggested that skills acquired at a young age, such as reading or math skills, may have an impact on the early labour market outcomes of individuals. In this study, tax data linked to the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) and the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) are used to examine the association between background factors at age 15 (including reading proficiency) and employment earnings in young adulthood for a cohort of respondents who were aged 15 in 2000.

    Release date: 2019-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019017
    Description:

    Occupations related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) are generally associated with high pay and contribute to the development of new technology. Continued growth is expected for STEM occupations, which would provide STEM-educated workers with additional labour market opportunities. However, less is known about the extent to which STEM graduates enter into and remain in STEM occupations in Canada. This study uses data from the 2006 and 2016 longitudinal census files to examine the occupational pathways of women and men with postsecondary credentials in STEM fields.

    Release date: 2019-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019018
    Description:

    This paper examines the impact of public sector salary disclosure laws on university faculty salaries in Canada. These laws, which give the public access to the salaries of individual faculty members if they exceed specified thresholds, were introduced in different provinces at different points in time. One of the most persistent and salient features of labour markets around the world is that women earn less than men. A hypothesis recently gaining traction among academic researchers and policy makers is that the gender earnings gap persists in part because it is hidden. There have also been calls in the private sector for more transparency on pay discrepancies between male and female workers. This paper provides new evidence on the causal effect of pay transparency laws on salaries.

    Release date: 2019-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019016
    Description:

    University graduates generally earn more than community college graduates, both shortly after graduation and for many years thereafter (Frenette 2019). This may partially reflect the fact that university programs are generally longer in duration. Most university students enroll in a four-year bachelor’s degree program, whereas most college students enroll in a one-year certificate program or in a two- or three-year diploma program. Recently, some colleges (mostly situated in Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia) have been offering four-year bachelor’s degree programs. Given the emergence of these new offerings, it would be informative for students, parents, education planners and employers to know whether college bachelor’s degree (CBD) programs are associated with similar labour market and educational pathways as university bachelor’s degree (UBD) programs.

    Release date: 2019-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100011
    Description:

    Over the past two decades, the share of the employed population aged 55 and over increased significantly. This study uses Census of Population and Labour Force Survey to examine the changing age composition of workers within the most prevalent occupations (with at least 10,000 workers), as well as the occupations that are increasing and decreasing in size most rapidly.

    Release date: 2019-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100009
    Description:

    This study examines the impact of social capital and ethnocultural characteristics on the evolution of employment income of a cohort of immigrants who arrived in Canada in 2001, based on two linked datasets: the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) and the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB). The study examines the employment income of this cohort in their first 15 years in Canada (i.e., from 2002 to 2016).

    Release date: 2019-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2019002
    Description:

    This paper uses the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey to assess the employment characteristics of Métis men and women. A number of other outcomes, influenced by these characteristics, are further explored, such as employment rates, employment income, education, occupation and employment types, economic instability, and self-reported mental health.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2019003
    Description:

    For Inuit, the term 'livelihood' encompasses work in the wage economy and in the labour that connects them with the land, their culture and their community. The results from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey presented in this paper highlight how important it is to include land-based economy in any examination of the labour market. Furthermore, these findings suggest the need for policies and programs aimed at improving Inuit employment and related economic outcomes.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2019004
    Description:

    This paper uses the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey to assess the employment characteristics of First Nations men and women, including occupation, industry and full-time/part-time employment. A number of other outcomes, influenced by these characteristics, are further explored, such as job satisfaction, skills, health, presence of disability, and measures of economic well-being such as food security.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019014
    Description:

    Canada has a relatively large foreign-born population, and the country’s economic prosperity depends on international trade. This paper examines how these two characteristics are linked. Specifically, it investigates the effect of immigrant business ownership on international trade in Canada.

    Understanding the impact of immigrants on international trade is particularly important for Canada, as it is a small open economy with a relatively large immigrant population. This paper empirically investigates the effect of immigrant business ownership on international trade in Canada using a newly developed firm-level database with detailed business ownership and trade information. The new data make it possible to better distinguish between the effect immigrants have on reducing information costs and on product demand, and to assess the impact of immigrant business ownership on the extensive and intensive margins of international trade.

    Release date: 2019-05-13
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Analysis (513)

Analysis (513) (460 to 470 of 513 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950021601
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canadian manufacturers surveyed earlier this year reported some hiring problems. A glance at the type of labour shortages cited by small and large firms.

    Release date: 1995-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011776
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The automotive industry comprises not only the manufacture or assembly of automotive parts and vehicles, but also the distribution, servicing and maintenance of the finished products. This article looks at the workforce involved in this important industry.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011778
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Immigration is a major source of new workers. This article profiles Canada's "newest" workers and compares their characteristics with those of Canadian-born workers.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011780
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    When productivity increases in a sector, does it mean employment growth? This article explores the question and introduces a new concept: multifactor productivity.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011781
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A summary of the one-day Symposium on the Greying of the Workforce, which explored the myths and realities of the situation facing older workers, as well as the implications for the coming decades.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041562
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    David Foot on the baby boom generation's influence on current and future forms of organizational structure in North America.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041582
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    An overview of the changing industrial structure in the census metropolitan areas of Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver since 1971.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994069
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Employment equity legislation is becoming more prevalent in Canadian labour markets, yet -- other than broad availability numbers -- the labour market experiencesof designated groups have not been well documented. Using the National Graduates Survey of 1992, this report profiles the early labour market experiences ofvisible minorities, Aboriginal peoples and persons with disabilities who graduated from Canadian universities and community colleges in 1990. In general, we find thatthe earnings of designated group members are very similar to the earnings of their classmates. However, we also find that members of these groups are more likely tobe unemployed and are less likely to participate in the labour force than others in their class.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994070
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses job turnover data to compare how job creation, job destruction and net job change differ for small and large establishments in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It uses several different techniques to correct for the regression-to-the-mean problem that, it has been suggested, might incorrectly lead to the conclusion that small establishments create a disproportionate number of new jobs. It finds that net job creation for smaller establishments is greater than that of large establishments after such changes are made. The paper also compares the importance of small and large establishments in the manufacturing sectors of Canada and the United States. The Canadian manufacturing sector is shown to have both a larger proportion of employment in smaller establishments but also to have a small establishment sector that is growing in importance relative to that of the United States.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994071
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The statistical observation that small firms have created the majority of new jobs during the 1980s has had a tremendous influence on public policy. Governmentshave looked to the small firm sector for employment growth, and have promoted policies to augment this expansion. However, recent research in the US suggeststhat net job creation in the small firm sector may have been overestimated, relative to that in large firms. This paper addresses various measurement issues raised inthe recent research, and uses a very unique Canadian longitudinal data set that encompasses all companies in the Canadian economy to reassess the issue of jobcreation by firm size. We conclude that over the 1978-92 period, for both the entire Canadian economy and the manufacturing sector, the growth rate of (net)employment decreases monotonically as the size of firm increases, no matter which method of sizing firms is used. The small firm sector has accounted for adisproportionate share of both gross job gains and job losses, and in that aggregate, accounted for a disproportionate share of the employment increase over theperiod. Measurement does matter, however, as the magnitude of the difference in the growth rates of small and large firms is very sensitive to the measurementapproaches used. The paper also produces results for various industrial sectors, asks whether the more rapid growth in industries with a high proportion of smallfirms is responsible for the findings at the all-economy level, and examines employment growth in existing small and large firms (ie excluding births). It is found thatemployment growth in the population of existing small and large firms is very similar.

    Release date: 1994-11-16
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024349
    Description:

    Measurement of gross flows in labour force status is an important objective of the continuing labour force surveys carried out by many national statistics agencies. However, it is well known that estimation of these flows can be complicated by nonresponse, measurement errors, sample rotation and complex design effects. Motivated by nonresponse patterns in household-based surveys, this paper focuses on estimation of labour force gross flows, while simultaneously adjusting for nonignorable nonresponse. Previous model-based approaches to gross flows estimation have assumed nonresponse to be an individual-level process. We propose a class of models that allow for nonignorable household-level nonresponse. A simulation study is used to show, that individual-level labour force gross flows estimates from household-based survey data, may be biased and that estimates using household-level models can offer a reduction in this bias.

    Release date: 1999-01-14
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