Employment and unemployment

Key indicators

Changing any selection will automatically update the page content.

Selected geographical area: Canada

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Canada

Selected geographical area: Nova Scotia

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Nova Scotia

Selected geographical area: New Brunswick

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: New Brunswick

Selected geographical area: Quebec

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Quebec

Selected geographical area: Ontario

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Ontario

Selected geographical area: Manitoba

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Manitoba

Selected geographical area: Saskatchewan

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Saskatchewan

Selected geographical area: Alberta

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Alberta

Selected geographical area: British Columbia

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: British Columbia

Selected geographical area: Yukon

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Yukon

Selected geographical area: Northwest Territories

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Northwest Territories

Selected geographical area: Nunavut

More employment and unemployment indicators

Selected geographical area: Nunavut

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Survey or statistical program

54 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (514)

All (514) (10 to 20 of 514 results)

  • Articles and reports: 71-222-X2019003
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) to highlight selected characteristics of multiple jobholders in 2018 and discuss notable shifts over the past few decades.

    Release date: 2019-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100015
    Description:

    Previous research has suggested that skills acquired at a young age, such as reading or math skills, may have an impact on the early labour market outcomes of individuals. In this study, tax data linked to the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) and the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) are used to examine the association between background factors at age 15 (including reading proficiency) and employment earnings in young adulthood for a cohort of respondents who were aged 15 in 2000.

    Release date: 2019-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019017
    Description:

    Occupations related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) are generally associated with high pay and contribute to the development of new technology. Continued growth is expected for STEM occupations, which would provide STEM-educated workers with additional labour market opportunities. However, less is known about the extent to which STEM graduates enter into and remain in STEM occupations in Canada. This study uses data from the 2006 and 2016 longitudinal census files to examine the occupational pathways of women and men with postsecondary credentials in STEM fields.

    Release date: 2019-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019018
    Description:

    This paper examines the impact of public sector salary disclosure laws on university faculty salaries in Canada. These laws, which give the public access to the salaries of individual faculty members if they exceed specified thresholds, were introduced in different provinces at different points in time. One of the most persistent and salient features of labour markets around the world is that women earn less than men. A hypothesis recently gaining traction among academic researchers and policy makers is that the gender earnings gap persists in part because it is hidden. There have also been calls in the private sector for more transparency on pay discrepancies between male and female workers. This paper provides new evidence on the causal effect of pay transparency laws on salaries.

    Release date: 2019-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019016
    Description:

    University graduates generally earn more than community college graduates, both shortly after graduation and for many years thereafter (Frenette 2019). This may partially reflect the fact that university programs are generally longer in duration. Most university students enroll in a four-year bachelor’s degree program, whereas most college students enroll in a one-year certificate program or in a two- or three-year diploma program. Recently, some colleges (mostly situated in Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia) have been offering four-year bachelor’s degree programs. Given the emergence of these new offerings, it would be informative for students, parents, education planners and employers to know whether college bachelor’s degree (CBD) programs are associated with similar labour market and educational pathways as university bachelor’s degree (UBD) programs.

    Release date: 2019-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100011
    Description:

    Over the past two decades, the share of the employed population aged 55 and over increased significantly. This study uses Census of Population and Labour Force Survey to examine the changing age composition of workers within the most prevalent occupations (with at least 10,000 workers), as well as the occupations that are increasing and decreasing in size most rapidly.

    Release date: 2019-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100009
    Description:

    This study examines the impact of social capital and ethnocultural characteristics on the evolution of employment income of a cohort of immigrants who arrived in Canada in 2001, based on two linked datasets: the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) and the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB). The study examines the employment income of this cohort in their first 15 years in Canada (i.e., from 2002 to 2016).

    Release date: 2019-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2019002
    Description:

    This paper uses the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey to assess the employment characteristics of Métis men and women. A number of other outcomes, influenced by these characteristics, are further explored, such as employment rates, employment income, education, occupation and employment types, economic instability, and self-reported mental health.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2019003
    Description:

    For Inuit, the term 'livelihood' encompasses work in the wage economy and in the labour that connects them with the land, their culture and their community. The results from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey presented in this paper highlight how important it is to include land-based economy in any examination of the labour market. Furthermore, these findings suggest the need for policies and programs aimed at improving Inuit employment and related economic outcomes.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2019004
    Description:

    This paper uses the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey to assess the employment characteristics of First Nations men and women, including occupation, industry and full-time/part-time employment. A number of other outcomes, influenced by these characteristics, are further explored, such as job satisfaction, skills, health, presence of disability, and measures of economic well-being such as food security.

    Release date: 2019-06-13
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (514)

Analysis (514) (450 to 460 of 514 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1995013
    Description:

    This paper describes the empirical data that will be available from Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) to help explain the choices women make in balancing home, family and work aspects of their lives.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031637
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the midst of extensive restructuring and downsizing, women have continued to enter male-dominated occupations, albeit more slowly than before. This study explores women's occupational crossovers from 1986 to 1991 and compares them with earlier developments between 1971 and 1986.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031638
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Does graduation from a university co-op program provide advantages in the job market? A comparison of graduates of university co-op programs with their non co-op counterparts.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031639
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Has the economy lost its capacity to generate enough full-time full-year employment to keep up with the growth in the working-age population? This article examines full-time and full-year employment rates by province from 1983 to 1993.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031640
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Starting in 1991, the participation rate of women has declined and shows no sign of resuming its long-standing upward trend. This note explores the rates of adult women aged 25 to 54 by different characteristics.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031641
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1994, for the first time in four years, employers expanded their workforces significantly. A look at recent changes in paid employment, earnings and hours across detailed industries.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995079
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The key hypothesis of this paper is that time use data bases make possible a broader view of the benefits and costs of human capital than is otherwise possible. This achievement is enabled by a set of integrated information on not only educational attainment but also on time devoted to formal and informal study, to paid and unpaid work of economic value, to work of civic value, to leisure activities, and to the educating of children by parents. It is argued that such information is central to human capital theory, though much of it, especially on the leisure costs of investment in human capital, has been hitherto ignored. This new information is important because it can be used to inform the debate over the key issues in this field -- for example, the value of increased public support to formal education -- by measuring previously overlooked aspects of the benefits and costs of investment in human capital.

    Release date: 1995-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995078
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the dynamics of job reallocation in the manufacturing sector of Canada. It does so by examining the pattern and magnitude of job gain, job loss, and total job turnover due to growth and decline of some firms, and entry and exit of other firms. It also investigates how the effect of cyclical as opposed to structural influences on job turnover have changed over time. Finally, the paper investigates whether the pattern and magnitude of job turnover differ across industries and across regions, and whether the differences are either caused by differences in cyclical sensitivity of job creation and job destruction or in the extent to which restructuring is taking place.

    Release date: 1995-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950021590
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the last decade, moonlighting has increased significantly. A look at the incidence of multiple jobholding in husband-wife families.

    Release date: 1995-06-01

  • 460. Work experience Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950021598
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, this article takes a first national look at the work experience of people of different ages, fields of work and levels of education.

    Release date: 1995-06-01
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024349
    Description:

    Measurement of gross flows in labour force status is an important objective of the continuing labour force surveys carried out by many national statistics agencies. However, it is well known that estimation of these flows can be complicated by nonresponse, measurement errors, sample rotation and complex design effects. Motivated by nonresponse patterns in household-based surveys, this paper focuses on estimation of labour force gross flows, while simultaneously adjusting for nonignorable nonresponse. Previous model-based approaches to gross flows estimation have assumed nonresponse to be an individual-level process. We propose a class of models that allow for nonignorable household-level nonresponse. A simulation study is used to show, that individual-level labour force gross flows estimates from household-based survey data, may be biased and that estimates using household-level models can offer a reduction in this bias.

    Release date: 1999-01-14
Date modified: