Employment and unemployment

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All (511) (10 to 20 of 511 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019018
    Description:

    This paper examines the impact of public sector salary disclosure laws on university faculty salaries in Canada. These laws, which give the public access to the salaries of individual faculty members if they exceed specified thresholds, were introduced in different provinces at different points in time. One of the most persistent and salient features of labour markets around the world is that women earn less than men. A hypothesis recently gaining traction among academic researchers and policy makers is that the gender earnings gap persists in part because it is hidden. There have also been calls in the private sector for more transparency on pay discrepancies between male and female workers. This paper provides new evidence on the causal effect of pay transparency laws on salaries.

    Release date: 2019-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019016
    Description:

    University graduates generally earn more than community college graduates, both shortly after graduation and for many years thereafter (Frenette 2019). This may partially reflect the fact that university programs are generally longer in duration. Most university students enroll in a four-year bachelor’s degree program, whereas most college students enroll in a one-year certificate program or in a two- or three-year diploma program. Recently, some colleges (mostly situated in Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia) have been offering four-year bachelor’s degree programs. Given the emergence of these new offerings, it would be informative for students, parents, education planners and employers to know whether college bachelor’s degree (CBD) programs are associated with similar labour market and educational pathways as university bachelor’s degree (UBD) programs.

    Release date: 2019-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100011
    Description:

    Over the past two decades, the share of the employed population aged 55 and over increased significantly. This study uses Census of Population and Labour Force Survey to examine the changing age composition of workers within the most prevalent occupations (with at least 10,000 workers), as well as the occupations that are increasing and decreasing in size most rapidly.

    Release date: 2019-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100009
    Description:

    This study examines the impact of social capital and ethnocultural characteristics on the evolution of employment income of a cohort of immigrants who arrived in Canada in 2001, based on two linked datasets: the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) and the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB). The study examines the employment income of this cohort in their first 15 years in Canada (i.e., from 2002 to 2016).

    Release date: 2019-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2019002
    Description:

    This paper uses the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey to assess the employment characteristics of Métis men and women. A number of other outcomes, influenced by these characteristics, are further explored, such as employment rates, employment income, education, occupation and employment types, economic instability, and self-reported mental health.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2019003
    Description:

    For Inuit, the term 'livelihood' encompasses work in the wage economy and in the labour that connects them with the land, their culture and their community. The results from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey presented in this paper highlight how important it is to include land-based economy in any examination of the labour market. Furthermore, these findings suggest the need for policies and programs aimed at improving Inuit employment and related economic outcomes.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2019004
    Description:

    This paper uses the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey to assess the employment characteristics of First Nations men and women, including occupation, industry and full-time/part-time employment. A number of other outcomes, influenced by these characteristics, are further explored, such as job satisfaction, skills, health, presence of disability, and measures of economic well-being such as food security.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019014
    Description:

    Canada has a relatively large foreign-born population, and the country’s economic prosperity depends on international trade. This paper examines how these two characteristics are linked. Specifically, it investigates the effect of immigrant business ownership on international trade in Canada.

    Understanding the impact of immigrants on international trade is particularly important for Canada, as it is a small open economy with a relatively large immigrant population. This paper empirically investigates the effect of immigrant business ownership on international trade in Canada using a newly developed firm-level database with detailed business ownership and trade information. The new data make it possible to better distinguish between the effect immigrants have on reducing information costs and on product demand, and to assess the impact of immigrant business ownership on the extensive and intensive margins of international trade.

    Release date: 2019-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019007
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the second half of 2017 and early 2018. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available as of April 17, 2019.

    Release date: 2019-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019011
    Description:

    Using data from Statistics Canada’s Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD), this paper has three objectives: (1) determining how the number of jobs created or destroyed by immigrant-owned private incorporated companies compared with that of firms with Canadian-born owners, (2) determining whether immigrant-owned firms were more likely than firms with Canadian-born owners to be high growth firms or rapidly shrinking firms, and (3) determining which immigrant characteristics were associated with a higher likelihood of immigrant-owned firms being high growth firms or rapidly shrinking firms.

    This paper addresses gross job creation (jobs created by expanding continuing firms and entering firms), gross job destruction (jobs terminated by contracting continuing firms and exiting firms), and net job change (the difference between gross job creation and gross job destruction).

    Release date: 2019-04-24
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Analysis (511)

Analysis (511) (440 to 450 of 511 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995087
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Firm turnover occurs as firms gain and lose market share as part of the competitive struggle. The reallocation of market share from one group to another is associated with productivity gain as the less productive lose share and the more productive gain market share. This paper examines the extent to which productivity has been enhanced by firm turnover over the last twenty years. It focuses on the extent to which this process changed during the 1980s and thereby contributed to the slowdown in productivity growth that was experienced by the manufacturing sector.

    Release date: 1996-05-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960012523
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Why did the economy slow down in 1995 and what was the effect on the labour market? This year-end review examines changes and trends in the labour market over the past year.

    Release date: 1996-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960012524
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    What does the distribution of unemployment look like in the 1990s? A focus on unemployment rates by census metropolitan area from 1987 to 1995.

    Release date: 1996-03-12

  • 444. Women entrepreneurs Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960012525
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Who are they? Where do they work? And how do their earnings compare with those of men in similar circumstances? This article looks at the growth in entrepreneurship among women, and compares their characteristics with those of their male counterparts.

    Release date: 1996-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960012527
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The official unemployment rate released each month is based on individuals. Also released, but less recognized, are family-based rates. Unemployment rates for individuals and families are compared using data from two different sources over the period 1980 to 1993.

    Release date: 1996-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995084
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to introduce in a new measure of the average duration of unemployment spells using Canadian data. The paper summarizes the work of Corak (1993) and Corak and Heisz (1994) on the average complete duration of unemployment in a non-technical way by focusing on the distinction between it and the average incomplete duration of unemployment, which is regularly released by Statistics Canada. It is pointed out that the latter is a lagging cyclical indicator. The average complete duration of unemployment is a more accurate indicator of prevailing labour market conditions, but some assumptions required in its derivation also imply that it lags actual developments.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1995008
    Description:

    This report looks at employment equity data available from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) for members of two employment equity designated groups: visible minorities and Aboriginal peoples. It also compares SLID data with 1991 Census data to evaluate the extent to which SLID data may be used for employment equity purposes.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1995013
    Description:

    This paper describes the empirical data that will be available from Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) to help explain the choices women make in balancing home, family and work aspects of their lives.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031637
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the midst of extensive restructuring and downsizing, women have continued to enter male-dominated occupations, albeit more slowly than before. This study explores women's occupational crossovers from 1986 to 1991 and compares them with earlier developments between 1971 and 1986.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031638
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Does graduation from a university co-op program provide advantages in the job market? A comparison of graduates of university co-op programs with their non co-op counterparts.

    Release date: 1995-09-05
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024349
    Description:

    Measurement of gross flows in labour force status is an important objective of the continuing labour force surveys carried out by many national statistics agencies. However, it is well known that estimation of these flows can be complicated by nonresponse, measurement errors, sample rotation and complex design effects. Motivated by nonresponse patterns in household-based surveys, this paper focuses on estimation of labour force gross flows, while simultaneously adjusting for nonignorable nonresponse. Previous model-based approaches to gross flows estimation have assumed nonresponse to be an individual-level process. We propose a class of models that allow for nonignorable household-level nonresponse. A simulation study is used to show, that individual-level labour force gross flows estimates from household-based survey data, may be biased and that estimates using household-level models can offer a reduction in this bias.

    Release date: 1999-01-14
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