Employment and unemployment

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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114630
    Description:

    This article examines the literacy and numeracy skills of off reserve First Nations and Métis adults aged 25 to 65, focusing on the factors and labour market outcomes associated with higher skill levels. In this study, individuals in the higher range for literacy and numeracy are defined as those who scored level 3 or higher (out of 5 levels) in tests administered by the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).

    Release date: 2016-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016058
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during late 2015 and early 2016. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 29, 2016.

    Release date: 2016-05-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016055
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents differences in labour market participation observed between immigrant wives and Canadian-born wives over the 2006-to-2014 period. It also assesses the degree to which the lower participation of immigrant wives, as compared with their Canadian-born counterparts, can be accounted for by differences in socioeconomic characteristics, such as family size, weekly wages of husbands, and labour force participation in the source country. The study uses the Labour Force Survey and World Bank indicators on source-country characteristics to examine these issues. Attention is restricted to Canadian-born women and landed immigrant women aged 25 to 54 who are married (or living in common-law relationships) with husbands aged 25 to 54 who are employed as paid workers. For simplicity, the terms ‘husbands’ and ‘wives’ are used to refer to men and women who are married or in common-law relationships.

    Release date: 2016-01-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-654-X2015005
    Description:

    Using data from the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD), this report examines the labour market experiences of people with disabilities. The CSD data offer opportunities for analysis of disability-specific aspects of employment, such as barriers encountered by people with disabilities, workplace accommodations needed and whether those needs are met, perceptions of disability-related discrimination in the work environment, and labour force discouragement among those who are neither working nor looking for work. This report aims to provide information to employers, and to spark further research in the area of disability and employment.

    Release date: 2015-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015053
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during first two quarters of 2015 and into the summer months. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on November 5, 2015.

    Release date: 2015-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-005-M2015002
    Description:

    This report provides information to users who wish to compare employment and unemployment estimates from the Canadian surveys (LFS and SEPH) and American surveys (CPS and CES). The aspects covered include concepts, methods, seasonal adjustment, timeliness, revisions and main uses.

    Release date: 2015-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015049
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article addresses three questions: (1) How has the full-time employment rate - the percentage of the population employed full time - evolved since the mid-1970s overall? (2) How has the full-time employment rate changed across age groups, education levels, sex, and regions? (3) To what extent have movements in full-time employment rates been driven by changes in the socio-demographic characteristics of Canadians and by changes in labour market participation rates, unemployment rates, and part-time employment rates?

    Release date: 2015-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015047
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents an overview of interprovincial paid employment over the 2002-to-2011 period. Interprovincial workers are individuals who maintain a permanent residence in a given province or territory but work in another. The results are based on Statistics Canada’s Canadian Employer-Employee Dynamics Database and pertain to employees aged 18 or older who earned at least $1,000 in 2002 dollars.

    Release date: 2015-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114202
    Description:

    This paper examines the employment patterns of families with children (under the age of 16) over the period from 1976 to 2014, with a particular focus on couple families with children. This article also highlights regional differences in the working patterns of parents, and provides additional information on the employment patterns of lone parents.

    Release date: 2015-06-24
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Analysis (513)

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  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020004
    Description:

    Unlike economic and family class immigrants, who mostly make their own choice about where to settle in Canada, the initial geographic location of refugees is strongly influenced by government resettlement programs. Government-assisted refugees (GARs) are assigned to one of many designated communities based on a pre-approved regional quota of refugee allocation and the match between a refugee’s needs and community resources. Privately sponsored refugees (PSRs) are received by their sponsors, who are scattered across the country. While previous research suggests that refugees, especially GARs, are more likely to undertake secondary migration than other immigrants, no large-scale quantitative study has compared the rates of departure from initial destination cities for different immigrant categories in the long term. This study compares long-term secondary migration in Canada by immigrant admission category, with a focus on the size of the initial city of settlement.

    Release date: 2020-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020003
    Description:

    From the early 2000s to the mid-2010s, the number of employees in manufacturing fell by roughly half a million in Canada. During that period, the percentage of Canadian men aged 21 to 55 employed mainly full time for at least 48 weeks in a given year fell by 5 percentage points, from 63.6% in 2000 to 58.6% in 2015. This study investigates whether the two trends are connected, i.e., whether the decline in manufacturing employment caused a decline in employment rates and wages among men.

    Release date: 2020-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019022
    Description:

    Canada and the United States are two major immigrant destinations with distinct immigration policies. The two countries also differ in immigration level and economy size, but their government structures, economic systems and social environment have many similarities. These similarities and differences provide a useful setting for comparative immigration research. This study compares the differences in the mismatch between the education and occupations of immigrants in Canada and the United States, operationalized by over-education. It further explores how the cross-country differences may be related to the supply of and demand for university-educated immigrants and the way they are selected.

    Release date: 2019-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201900100012
    Description:

    The Activities of Multinational Enterprises in Canada program describes the characteristics, activity, financial position and performance of multinational and non-multinational enterprises in Canada. This paper focuses specifically on the characteristics of employment at foreign and Canadian multinational enterprises operating in Canada, by province and industry. This study focuses specifically on the employment characteristics in Canada, by province and industry, of foreign MNEs, Canadian MNEs and non-MNE corporations.

    Release date: 2019-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019016
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article compares the labour force participation of temporary foreign workers with open work permits and employer-specific work permits in terms of their level of labour market engagement in Canada, their distribution by province and industry, and the duration of temporary residence status and rate of transition to permanent residency.

    Release date: 2019-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100016
    Description:

    Based on integrated data from the 2006 and 2016 censuses, this study examines the educational outcomes of a cohort of children with an immigrant background who were aged 13 to 17 in 2006, and the employment earnings of young adults who had immigrant parents. In this study, the outcomes of children of immigrant parents from different regions are compared with those of children of Canadian-born parents.

    Release date: 2019-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2019018
    Description:

    Using integrated data from the 2006 and 2016 censuses, this study examines the educational and labour market outcomes of a cohort of immigrant children aged 9 to 17 years in 2006. In this study, the results of the children of immigrants from various regions of origin are compared with those of children of Canadian-born parents.

    Release date: 2019-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019014
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the first half of 2019 and into the summer months. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available as of October 18, 2019.

    Release date: 2019-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019020
    Description:

    Youth not in employment, education or training (NEET) are considered to be at risk for long-term economic and social difficulties. The number of youth NEET is important to Canada and has also become a global issue, as evidenced by its inclusion as an indicator in the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. To date, most of the Canadian studies on this topic have focused on the sociodemographic characteristics of youth NEET and on their educational and employment experiences during their transition from school to work. Thus, relatively little is known about the psychosocial well-being of youth NEET in the Canadian context. This report aims to address this gap by providing a psychosocial profile of youth NEET compared with youth non-NEET in Canada.

    Release date: 2019-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 71-222-X2019003
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) to highlight selected characteristics of multiple jobholders in 2018 and discuss notable shifts over the past few decades.

    Release date: 2019-10-28
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024349
    Description:

    Measurement of gross flows in labour force status is an important objective of the continuing labour force surveys carried out by many national statistics agencies. However, it is well known that estimation of these flows can be complicated by nonresponse, measurement errors, sample rotation and complex design effects. Motivated by nonresponse patterns in household-based surveys, this paper focuses on estimation of labour force gross flows, while simultaneously adjusting for nonignorable nonresponse. Previous model-based approaches to gross flows estimation have assumed nonresponse to be an individual-level process. We propose a class of models that allow for nonignorable household-level nonresponse. A simulation study is used to show, that individual-level labour force gross flows estimates from household-based survey data, may be biased and that estimates using household-level models can offer a reduction in this bias.

    Release date: 1999-01-14
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