Employment and unemployment

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  • Journals and periodicals: 71-222-X
    Description:

    Labour Statistics at a Glance features short analytical articles on specific topics of interest related to Canada's labour market. The studies examine recent or historical trends using data produced by the Labour Statistics Division, i.e., the Labour Force Survey, the Survey of Employment Payrolls and Hours, the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey, the Employment Insurance Coverage Survey and the Employment Insurance Statistics Program.

    Release date: 2019-10-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-606-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series of analytical reports provides an overview of the Canadian labour market experiences of immigrants to Canada, based on data from the Labour Force Survey. These reports examine the labour force characteristics of immigrants, by reporting on employment and unemployment at the Canada level, for the provinces and large metropolitan areas. They also provide more detailed analysis by region of birth, as well as in-depth analysis of other specific aspects of the immigrant labour market.

    Release date: 2018-12-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-651-X
    Description:

    This article presents employment and unemployment rates, and some information regarding salaries and industrial sectors of employees, for official-language minorities. These data are based on the Labour Force Survey and enable comparisons between official-language minority and majority according to their situation in the labour market for provinces or groups of provinces.

    Release date: 2012-11-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-001-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication brings together and analyzes a wide range of labour and income data. Topics include youth in the labour market, pensions and retirement, work arrangements, education and training, and trends in family income. One section highlights new products, surveys, research projects and conferences. Another section uses charts and text to describe a variety of subjects related to labour and income. Each winter print issue contains an index of all published articles.

    To find the latest updates on labour market and household issues such as gambling, minimum wage, retirement and unionization, please visit: Topics of interest on labour and income.

    Release date: 2012-08-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-604-X
    Description:

    Literacy for Life, is the second report from the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey. It presents additional results on the nature and magnitude of the literacy gaps faced by OECD countries and how these gaps have evolved over the medium term.

    It offers new insights into the factors that influence the formation of adult skills in various settings - at home and at work - for the eleven countries participating in the first and last round of data collection between 2003 and 2008. The study offers comparative evidence on the impact of various factors on the supply of skill. The study offers a special focus on numeracy skills and problem solving skills. It explores the relationships between numeracy and key socio-demographic factors as well as labour market outcomes and earnings.

    It highlights the importance of problem solving skills by defining this foundational skill and by exploring its determinants as well as its relative role in influencing important labour market outcomes.

    The report offers also an analysis of performance across multiple skill domains. It investigates the skill profiles of various population groups defined in terms of the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of those who score at levels deemed to be low in one or more skill domains and explores the resulting consequences.

    The report concludes by investigating the issue of skill mismatch in the labour market and its relationship to adult learning. The extent and distribution of mismatch between the day to day literacy related requirements of workers and the literacy skills they have obtained is an important issue that is being explored in this study.

    Release date: 2011-12-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-001-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Update on family and labour studies is the newsletter of the Family and Labour Studies Division, a research arm of Statistics Canada devoted to analysis of the well-being of children and families and to how they interact with the labour market and social programs.

    Release date: 2007-05-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-624-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Immigrants to Canada must face numerous difficulties during their first years in the country, the two most important being to find an appropriate job and language barrier. But does a better knowledge of official languages increase the chances for an immigrant of occupying a high-skilled job, a job in the intended occupation, a job similar to the one they had before immigrating, a job related to their training or field of study, or to have a higher hourly rate?

    In an attempt to answer this question, the data from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) were used. In the LSIC, a cohort of immigrants was interviewed at three points in time being 6 months, 2 years and 4 years after arrival in the country. For this study, we used the information about the job occupied at the time of each interview, as well as the English and French self-assessed spoken ability levels at each of these moments.

    Release date: 2007-04-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0133X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides annual updates to the data presented in the labour force chapter in the Statistics Canada publication Women in Canada 2000 (catalogue no. 89-503-XPE, October 2000) which documents the major changes in the evolving status of women in Canada. Topics covered in this report include trends in employment, shifts in the occupational distribution of women, part-time work, self-employment and unemployment rates.

    Release date: 2007-04-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 83-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) is the first nationally representative survey to focus on the working conditions and health of Canada's nurses. Registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) in all provinces and territories shared their perceptions on a variety of topics, including:- workload- working overtime, whether paid or unpaid- adverse events such as medication errors and patient falls- support and respect from co-workers and supervisors- staffing adequacy- working relations with physicians- their own chronic diseases and injuries- their mental health.

    The 2005 NSWHN was developed in collaboration with organizations representing practicing nurses, health care researchers, health information specialists and federal government departments. The survey was conducted by Statistics Canada in partnership with the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Health Canada. A total of 18,676 nurses were interviewed, representing LPNs, RNs and RPNs in a variety of health care settings and in all provinces and territories. The survey's impressive response rate of 80% reflects the enthusiasm and support of nurses across the country.

    The survey collected information on a rich array of topics reflecting the physical and emotional challenges nurses face in delivering patient care today. Nurses answered many questions about the quality of patient care, working relations with co-workers and managers, the amount of time they work to get their jobs done, and the way they feel about their jobs and careers as nurses. Data from the 2005 NSWHN will provide an invaluable resource for researchers, health care providers, policy makers and anyone with an interest in human resources, particularly in the health care field.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-616-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper contains regional and provincial findings from the second wave of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC). The LSIC was designed to study how newly arrived immigrants adjust over time to living in Canada.

    This paper focuses on the issue of labour market integration for immigrants at the regional and provincial levels. Labour market integration is a critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. For the major provinces and Census Metropolitan Areas, this paper addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2006-01-31
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  • Journals and periodicals: 89-615-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC), conducted jointly by Statistics Canada and Citizenship and Immigration Canada under the Policy Research Initiative, is a comprehensive survey designed to study the process by which new immigrants adapt to Canadian society. About 12,000 immigrants aged 15 and older who arrived in Canada from abroad between October 2000 and September 2001 were interviewed. By late 2005, when all three waves of interviews will have been completed, the survey will provide a better understanding of how the settlement process unfolds for new immigrants.

    The results of this survey will provide valuable information on how immigrants are meeting various challenges associated with integration and what resources are most helpful to their settlement in Canada. The main topics being investigated include housing, education, foreign credentials recognition, employment, income, the development and use of social networks, language skills, health, values and attitudes, and satisfaction with the settlement experience.

    Results from the first wave of the LSIC had shown that labour market integration was a particularly critical aspect of the immigrant settlement process. This paper therefore focuses on this issue. The release addresses questions such as: how long does it take newly arrived immigrants to get their first job? How many of them find employment in their intended occupation? And what obstacles do they encounter when looking for work?

    Release date: 2005-10-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-587-X
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This paper provides information on Aboriginal employment and unemployment, Aboriginal youths and the impact of education on labour market performance in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia. Annual average data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) on off-reserve Aboriginal peoples from April 2004 to March 2005 are used.

    Release date: 2005-06-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 75F0033M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is developing a body of knowledge on the nonprofit sector in Canada through the Nonprofit Sector Knowledge Base Project. The results of research studies are reported periodically in a series of brief reports posted on Statistics Canada's website. The findings will be of interest to those researching the voluntary sector or working in nonprofit organizations.

    Release date: 2001-09-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 72F0020X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This research paper summarizes the approach, methodology and results of a study of the labour market behaviour of persons in various categories of attachment to the labour market. The analysis focuses on the transition probabilities for various categories of labour market attachment. Specifically, the study will include a discussion of the behavioural differences of the following groups:

    a) a comparison of transitions from U (unemployed), M (marginally attached - wants work) and N (not attached - does not want work); b) a further breakdown of the transitions from U by active searchers, passive searchers, those on temporary layoff and short-term future starts; c) a further breakdown of transitions for M by reason for not searching; and d) a further breakdown of transitions from N by long-term future starts and other.

    The study will be based on 1997-1999 Labour Force Survey data.

    Release date: 2000-01-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-553-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The contributors to this book examine two broad themes related to the well-being of Canadian youth. First, they document the nature of the labour market facing young adults and how it has changed since the early 1970s. Second, the authors examine how families, communities, and the public sector influence some of the ways in which children become successful and self-reliant adults. The motivation for bringing these essays together has to do with the increasing importance of child well-being in public discourse and the development of public policy. The major message to emerge is that the future of Canada's children is both a good news, and a bad news story. Labour markets have changed dramatically, and on average it is now more difficult to obtain a strong foothold that will lead to increasing prosperity. Many young Canadians, however, are well prepared by their family and community backgrounds to deal with these new challenges, and as young parents are in a position to pass this heritage on to their children. However, this has not been the case for an increasingly larger minority, a group whose children in turn may face greater than average challenges in getting ahead in life. A companion volume published in February of 1998 by Statistics Canada called Government finances and generational equity examines the operation of government taxes and transfers from a generational perspective, focusing on the conduct of fiscal policy and the relative status of individuals in successive generations.

    Release date: 1998-11-05
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