Employment by occupation, industry or sector

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  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200411113130
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Nurses make up the largest proportion of health workers in Canada. However, these days they are under increasing pressure. Their average age has increased, enrolment in nursing programs declined during the 1990s, and employment of lower-paid unregulated workers has increased. A look at employment trends between 1987 and 2003 for registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and nurse aides and orderlies.

    Release date: 2004-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004019
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines the effect of Christmas shopping on retail sales and employment during the months of November, December and January. The analysis focusses on stores registering significantly increased activity during the holiday season. These stores were grouped by the relative expensiveness of their most popular offerings during this period. This study uses data from the Monthly Retail Trade Survey and the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours.

    Release date: 2004-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2004006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this bulletin, each industry is examined to assess the differences in occupational skill intensity between rural and urban Canada.

    Release date: 2004-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2004005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study explores the information and communications technology (ICT) industries and science-based industries of Canada's knowledge economy.

    Release date: 2004-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 16-001-M2004001
    Description:

    The collection of firms producing environmental goods and delivering environmental services constitutes the 'environment industry.' This industry has grown significantly in the past 20 years and stands to continue this development in the future as emerging issues such as the level of greenhouse gas emissions are addressed.

    An important aspect in the evaluation of the industry's performance is in the area of job creation and employment generation. Related to the challenges involved in classifying firms to the environment industry is the issue of identifying the employees who work in environment-related activities. Currently, the published data on employment include only the total employment of those businesses producing environmental goods and services, i.e., employees who worked in the production/provision of goods and services that have both environmental and non-environmental applications.

    Release date: 2004-04-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20031126699
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines characteristics and earnings of health workers - professionals, technical personnel and support personnel - using the 1991 and 2001 censuses. It examines the characteristics of nurses and doctors in more detail.

    Release date: 2004-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200400113106
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the first eight months of 2003, employment growth was minimal. However, during the last four months, employment surged ahead sufficiently to salvage a modest gain for the year.

    Release date: 2004-01-23

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020036754
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines some of the many factors that influence the well-being of Canada's culture sector and its workforce: the country's general economic conditions; government programs and policies; and consumer demand, of both domestic and imported culture goods and services.

    The forces of economic, social, political and technological change are radically transforming the world of culture and its labour force. The 1980s saw a rapid expansion of the culture workforce to meet increased demand for culture goods and services. This period of growth paused with the 1990/91 recession: jobs, earnings and revenues all fell off. With the end of the recession, the labour market rebounded and culture workers rode this high employment wave throughout the remainder of the decade.

    Countries have become more conscious of the role that culture plays in their development, their identity and the sustenance of their value systems. In many countries culture sectors are now targets of international economic development policies. Global trade and the continued high demand in Canada for imported culture goods and services make the culture economy in this country (and, in turn, employment in the culture sector) variable and highly competitive.

    Release date: 2004-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    While the number of census-farms and farm operators is shrinking, the number of jobs in the agriculture and agri-food industry is growing. During the 15-year period from 1981 to 1996, the industry employed 15% of Canada's workforce.

    Employment in the agri-food sector has grown faster than the overall Canadian economy and this has offset the decline in employment on farms. In 1981, more people worked on farms than worked in restaurants, bars and taverns. By 1996, this trend had reversed and employment in the food and beverage services sector far outstripped the number of workers on farms.

    Food processing is often promoted as part of agricultural policy (to provide a local market for Canadian farmers) and as part of rural development policy (to create jobs in rural areas). However, in 1996, fewer people were working in Canada's food processing sector than in 1981. More food was processed (there was growth in the gross domestic product (GDP) of this sector), but fewer workers were involved. Rural regions adjacent to urban areas gained a greater share of food processing employment, making these regions relatively competitive in keeping food processing workforces.

    Employment in the agricultural and agri-food sectors is growing, but the nature of the work and where it is being done is changing.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311113104
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at the high-tech sector in 2002, a year after high-profile layoffs were made in response to the collapse in demand for its products and services.

    Release date: 2003-12-08
Reference (25)

Reference (25) (0 to 10 of 25 results)

  • Classification: 12-583-X
    Description:

    This publication provides a systematic classification structure to identify and categorize the entire range of occupational activity in Canada. It consists of 10 broad occupational categories which are subdivided into major groups, minor groups and unit groups. Definitions and occupational titles are provided for each unit group. An alphabetical index of the occupational titles classified to the unit group level is also included.

    Release date: 2018-12-19

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-388-X
    Description:

    This report contains basic conceptual and data quality information to help users interpret and make use of census occupation data. It gives an overview of the collection, coding (to the 2001 National Occupational Classification), edit and imputation of the occupation data from the 2001 Census. The report describes procedural changes between the 2001 and earlier censuses, and provides an analysis of the quality level of the 2001 Census occupation data. Finally, it details the revision of the 1991 Standard Occupational Classification used in the 1991 and 1996 Censuses to the 2001 National Occupational Classification for Statistics used in 2001. The historical comparability of data coded to the two classifications is discussed. Appendices to the report include a table showing historical data for the 1991, 1996 and 2001 Censuses.

    Release date: 2004-07-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-391-X
    Description:

    This report contains basic conceptual and data quality information intended to facilitate the use and interpretation of census industry data. It provides an overview of the industry processing cycle, including elements such as regional processing, edit and imputation, and the tabulation of error rates. A detailed explanation of the automated coding systems used in the 2001 Census is also documented, in addition to notable changes in the imputation procedures. The report concludes with summary tables that indicate the level of data quality in the 2001 Census industry data. Appendices to the report contain historical data going back to the 1971 Census.

    Release date: 2004-06-02

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-389-X
    Description:

    This report contains basic conceptual and data quality information intended to facilitate the use and interpretation of census industry data. It provides an overview of the industry processing cycle, including elements such as regional processing, edit and imputation, and the tabulation of error rates. Notable changes in the industrial classification structure are discussed as well as differences in the coding procedures from the previous census (1996). The report concludes with summary tables that indicate the level of data quality in the 2001 Census industry data.

    Release date: 2004-05-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1996005
    Description:

    This paper examines a new variable which would show whether a person's job is related to his or her postsecondary education. This variable would help to explain other characteristics measured in the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID), such as wages, supervisory roles, and job stability.

    Release date: 1997-12-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1993009
    Description:

    This paper presents an analysis of the questions in the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) relating to supervision and management. It uses data collected in January 1993.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Classification: 12-565-X
    Description:

    The Standard Occupational Classification provides a systematic classification structure to identify and categorize the entire range of occupational activity in Canada. This up-to-date classification is based upon, and easily related to, the National Occupational Classification. It consists of 10 broad occupational categories which are subdivided into major groups, minor groups and unit groups. Definitions and occupational titles are provided for each unit group. An alphabetical index of the occupational titles classified to the unit group level is also included.

    Release date: 1993-08-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 1713
    Description: The objective of this program is to provide data on employment (number of employees, wages and salaries) in the public sector, i.e. the federal, provincial, territorial and local general governments, health and social service institutions, universities, colleges, vocational and trade institutions, school boards, and government business enterprises.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2603
    Description: This survey is an establishment census survey designed to gather data on employment, payrolls and paid-hours from larger employers (companies or establishments of 20 or more employees).

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2612
    Description: The Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours provides a monthly portrait of the amount of earnings, as well as the number of jobs (i.e., occupied positions) and hours worked by detailed industry at the national, provincial and territorial levels.
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