Earnings, wages and non-wage benefits

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  • 1. Shifting pensions Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910513230
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2006, 37% of the employed Canadian population was covered by a registered pension plan. Defined benefit plans have historically covered the majority of plan participants. Defined contribution plans have recently become more prominent. This article examines the increased prevalence of such plans in Canada between 1991 and 2006 and the factors influencing this trend.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001163
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents the findings of an empirical investigation of the effects of inter-provincial migration on individuals' earnings based on the newly available Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD). The main results are based on a difference model which estimates the effects of mobility on (log) earnings which implicitly controls for initial earnings levels and other fixed effects, as well as other influences captured by the regressors included in the models. Inter-provincial mobility is found to be associated with statistically significant and in many cases quantitatively substantial changes in individuals' earnings, with these effects varying by age, sex, and province of origin. Pre- and post-move earnings profiles are also analysed, offering support for the validity of the difference model approach and indicating that movers are quickly integrated into local labour markets after their moves. Implications are discussed and possible directions for future research are suggested.

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999138
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this paper, we assemble data from several household surveys to document how pension coverage of young and older workers has evolved in Canada between the mid-1980s and the mid-1990s. Our main findings are the following. First, both administrative data from the Pension Plans in Canada (PPIC) database and data from household surveys show an increase in RPP coverage for women. In contrast, while PPIC data show a decrease in coverage for men, household surveys indicate no downward trend for males. Second, sample aggregates hide interesting differences within the population. We find that the pension coverage of young workers (aged 25-34) has declined relative to older workers (aged 35-54). Young males have experienced a decline in coverage while RPP coverage has remained fairly stable for older men. In contrast, pension coverage has remained fairly constant for young women but has risen substantially for older women. Third, the decline in unionism and shifts towards industries with low-coverage explain most of the decrease in coverage observed among young men. Fourth, the growth in older women's coverage appears to be the result of their greater propensity to be employed in highly paid/highly covered occupations.

    Release date: 1999-12-22
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  • 1. Shifting pensions Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910513230
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2006, 37% of the employed Canadian population was covered by a registered pension plan. Defined benefit plans have historically covered the majority of plan participants. Defined contribution plans have recently become more prominent. This article examines the increased prevalence of such plans in Canada between 1991 and 2006 and the factors influencing this trend.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001163
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents the findings of an empirical investigation of the effects of inter-provincial migration on individuals' earnings based on the newly available Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD). The main results are based on a difference model which estimates the effects of mobility on (log) earnings which implicitly controls for initial earnings levels and other fixed effects, as well as other influences captured by the regressors included in the models. Inter-provincial mobility is found to be associated with statistically significant and in many cases quantitatively substantial changes in individuals' earnings, with these effects varying by age, sex, and province of origin. Pre- and post-move earnings profiles are also analysed, offering support for the validity of the difference model approach and indicating that movers are quickly integrated into local labour markets after their moves. Implications are discussed and possible directions for future research are suggested.

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999138
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this paper, we assemble data from several household surveys to document how pension coverage of young and older workers has evolved in Canada between the mid-1980s and the mid-1990s. Our main findings are the following. First, both administrative data from the Pension Plans in Canada (PPIC) database and data from household surveys show an increase in RPP coverage for women. In contrast, while PPIC data show a decrease in coverage for men, household surveys indicate no downward trend for males. Second, sample aggregates hide interesting differences within the population. We find that the pension coverage of young workers (aged 25-34) has declined relative to older workers (aged 35-54). Young males have experienced a decline in coverage while RPP coverage has remained fairly stable for older men. In contrast, pension coverage has remained fairly constant for young women but has risen substantially for older women. Third, the decline in unionism and shifts towards industries with low-coverage explain most of the decrease in coverage observed among young men. Fourth, the growth in older women's coverage appears to be the result of their greater propensity to be employed in highly paid/highly covered occupations.

    Release date: 1999-12-22
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