Earnings by age or sex

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  • Table: 14-10-0324-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Average and median gender pay ratio in annual employment income and in annual wages, salaries and commissions. Data are available by National Occupational Classification (NOC) and age group.

    Release date: 2019-05-21

  • Table: 14-10-0320-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 282-0167)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Monthly
    Description: Average usual hours and wages of employees (full- and part-time) by age group, sex, union coverage, job permanency, and National Occupational Classification (NOC), last 5 months.
    Release date: 2019-05-10

  • Table: 14-10-0320-02
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Monthly
    Description: Average usual hours and wages of employees (full- and part-time) by age group, sex, union coverage, job permanency, and National Occupational Classification (NOC). Data are presented for 24 months earlier, 12 months earlier and current month, as well as 24-month and year-over-year level change and percentage change.
    Release date: 2019-05-10

  • Stats in brief: 89-28-0001201800100010
    Description:

    The purpose of this edition is to raise awareness about the gender wage gap. It does so by presenting "Equal Pay Day" on the date when women effectively start working for free in Canada, and by providing a general overview of women's experiences in the labour market.

    Release date: 2018-11-23

  • Table: 11-10-0031-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 111-0024)
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration, Census metropolitan area part, Census agglomeration part
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Individuals; Labour income profile of tax filers by sex (final T1 Family File; T1FF).
    Release date: 2018-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154974
    Description:

    This study uses the 2017 and 2018 Labour Force Survey to provide a recent profile of minimum wage workers. The paper focuses on three groups of minimum wage workers: students aged 15 to 24 and non-students the same age living with their parents (referred to below as minimum wage workers under 25); individuals aged 15 to 64 who are single, lone parents or spouses/partners in single-earner couples; and individuals aged 15 to 64 who are spouses/partners in dual-earner couples. The article documents the relative importance of these three groups as well as their weekly wages and work patterns.

    Release date: 2018-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2018082
    Description:

    The Canadian and U.S. labour markets have experienced a number of economic shocks since the early 2000s. This Economic Insights article assesses how employment rates and wages of persons aged 25 to 54 evolved in Canada and the United States from 2000 to 2017. The analysis is based on data from Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey (LFS), and on the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Current Population Survey (CPS).

    Release date: 2018-06-04

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2018013
    Description:

    This infographic provides information on the employment rates and wages of Canadian and American workers aged 25 to 54 who did not have a bachelor’s degree or a higher level of education in 2017.

    Release date: 2018-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018405
    Description:

    Over the last three decades, full-time jobs and permanent jobs have generally become scarcer for youth. In addition, median real hourly wages of young men employed in full-time jobs grew little, if at all, from the early 1980s to the mid-2010s. Along with other pieces of evidence from media reports, these facts have raised concerns that recent youth cohorts now experience less favourable earnings trajectories as they age than previous cohorts did 40 years ago. This study compares the earnings trajectories of several recent cohorts of young workers with those of cohorts who entered the labour market in the late 1970s. The study combines three versions of Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Worker file (LWF) and covers the 1978-to-2015 period.

    Release date: 2018-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017400
    Description:

    Despite a large literature estimating the effects of income taxation on the labour decisions of young and middle-aged workers, little is known about the extent to which older workers respond to changes in their income taxes. This paper explores this unresolved empirical issue, using longitudinal administrative data on more than one million individuals from Canada and exploiting a recent tax reform in the empirical identification strategy that explicitly targeted older couples. The findings offer new insight into the “black box” of intra-household labour supply and inform the optimal designs of income tax and retirement income systems.

    Release date: 2017-11-23
Data (20)

Data (20) (0 to 10 of 20 results)

Analysis (35)

Analysis (35) (20 to 30 of 35 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1999008
    Description:

    This article investigates the extent to which factors not previously explored in the Canadian context account for wage differences between men and women. It uses data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1999-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990044755
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In addition to the Survey of Consumer Finances, the Labour Force Survey now provides a way of comparing women's earnings with men's. The tow measures are explained here, as are the reasons for the sizable gap between them.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999131
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using a regression decomposition approach, we find that, during the 1980s, the growth in the relative educational attainment of older workers has contributed to about one-quarter of the increase in the age-wage gap of men and women. During the 1990s, the age-wage gap increased to a much lesser extent. Changing relative educational attainment accounted for a much greater proportion of the much smaller increase in the gap: almost one-half for males and over three-quarters for women. We also find that, during the 1980s, the expected weekly wages associated with all levels of education fell for younger workers, both for men and women (from 2% to 16%, depending upon education level). Older employees, on the other hand, experienced mixed results. Expected weekly wages rose for some older workers and fell for some others.

    Release date: 1999-03-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999130
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Several recent studies have found that earnings inequality in Canada has grown considerably since the late 1970's. Using an extraordinary data base drawn from longitudinal income tax records, we decompose this growth in earnings inequality into its persistent and transitory components. We find that the growth in earnings inequality reflects both an increase in long-run inequality and an increase in earnings instability. Our large sample size enables us to estimate and test richer models than could be supported by the relatively small panel surveys used in most previous research on earnings dynamics. For example, we are able to incorporate both heterogeneous earnings growth and a random-walk process in the same model, and we find that both are empirically significant.

    Release date: 1999-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998113
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Our objective is to obtain an accurate estimate of the degree of intergenerational income mobility in Canada. We use income tax information on about 400,000 father-son pairs, and find intergenerational earnings elasticities to be about 0.2. Earnings mobility tends to be slightly greater than income mobility, but non-parametric techniques uncover significant non-linearities in both of these relationships. Intergenerational earnings mobility is greater at the lower end of the income distribution than at the upper end, and displays an inverted V-shape elsewhere. Intergenerational income mobility follows roughly the same pattern, but is much lower at the very top of the income distribution.

    Release date: 1998-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998112
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The study examines the reason for the significant increase in the 'age premium' over the period 1981-94. The age premium refers to the percentage difference in hourly earnings between 'younger' (25-34) and 'older' (45-54) workers. In 1994, the hourly rate of older males was 32.4% higher than that of younger males. The corresponding age premium among females was 15.5%. Over the period 1981-94, the age premium increased by 15.7 percentage points among males and 19.5 percentage points among females.

    Evidence based on analysis of the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) public use microdata shows that, while there has been a trend toward non-standard employment, this so far has affected mostly workers under age 25 and cannot explain the rise in the age premium between ages 25-to-34 and 45-to-54, which is the focus of this study.

    A more likely explanation identified by the study is the dramatic improvement in the level of education of older workers over the last 14 years. For example, from 1981 to 1994 the percentage of older male workers with grade 10 education or less declined from 41.9% to 19.6%, while the percentage with post-secondary diplomas and degrees increased from 32.1% to 51.7%. The education level of younger male workers also improved over the same period, but the rate of improvement was smaller and, by 1994, there was virtually no difference in the incidence of post-secondary diplomas and degrees between younger and older workers. Similar trends took place among female workers. Shift-share analysis shows that the narrowing of the education gap between older and younger workers explains 44% of the age premium rise among male employees and 50% of the age premium rise among female employees.

    Release date: 1998-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998116
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The increase in earnings inequality among men in particular in Canada has been well documented. This paper adds to our knowledge of inequality trends by addressing three issues. First, what has happened to earnings inequality among the employed population in the 1990s? We find that earnings inequality and polarization increased little in the population of all workers (men and women combined) between the mid-1980s and mid-1990s. The second question relates to the impact of the changing propensity of Canadians to hold a job on earnings inequality. Put another way, if we focus on the entire population of working age Canadians (those with and without paid employment), what are the inequality trends. We find that earnings inequality among the working age population changed little over the 1980s and 1990s. This analysis incorporates both the influence of the changing employment/population ratio and inequality trends among employed workers on overall earnings inequality among the working age population. But this relative stability in overall earnings inequality since the mid-1980s masks a number of offsetting underlying trends. Some groups of workers are making earnings gains (notably older workers, and women) while others are losing (notably younger workers and men). This paper focuses in particular on the earnings trends among younger workers, and finds that the decline in annual earnings of younger male workers in particular is associated with a decline in real hourly wages.

    Release date: 1998-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960022890
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Contrary to popular belief, the average earnings of men working full year full time seem to decline prior to retirement. This study explores several possible explanations for the unexpected pattern.

    Release date: 1996-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1996089
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this paper we use administrative data associated with the tax system to: (1) document the extent of intergenerational income mobility among Canadian men; and (2) estimate the income disadvantage (in adulthood) of being raised in a low income household. We find that there is considerable intergenerational income mobility in Canada among middle income earners, but that the inheritance of economic status is significant at both the very top and very bottom of the income distribution. About one-third of those in the bottom quartile were raised by fathers who occupied the same position in the income distribution. In fact, the income advantage of someone who had a father in the top decile over someone who had a father in the bottom decile is in the order of 40%. We also discuss some of the policy implications of these findings, as well as some of their limitations and the directions implied for future research.

    Release date: 1996-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1995014
    Description:

    This paper follows up on the initial article in the publication Dynamics of Labour and Income, 1994 Report. The analysis remains the same, but it provides detailed variable groupings, regression and decomposition results which were not originally included.

    Release date: 1995-12-30
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