Other content related to Personal and household taxation

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  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202301100004
    Description: There is considerable policy interest in engaging hard-to-reach populations in Canada and integrating them into the tax system so they can receive the benefits intended to support them. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database, this study provides insights into the tax-filing behaviour of newly landed immigrants and their families over time in Canada.
    Release date: 2023-11-22

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202332631084
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2023-11-22

  • Table: 36-10-0432-01
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Annual final consumption expenditure for the household sector excluding sales tax; provincial sales taxes, and; Goods and Services tax, by province and territory.
    Release date: 2023-11-08

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100500002
    Description:

    The financial resources available to families with young children are an important factor affecting child development, and they can have long-term impacts on socioeconomic outcomes in adulthood.

    This article summarizes the findings of a new study using Statistic Canada’s data and analyzes the effects of expanding child tax benefits on after-tax income among single mothers, in the context of the 2015 reform to the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) and the 2016 introduction of the Canada Child Benefit (CCB).

    Release date: 2021-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019008
    Description:

    The primary objective of this study is to describe the general income trends pre- and post-release for veterans released from the regular forces since 1998. It also provides some directions for future work. This study is part of the Life After Service Studies (LASS) research program. LASS is a partnership between Veterans Affairs Canada, the Department of National Defence and Statistics Canada. For this income study, information on veterans was linked to the T1 Family File (income data on tax filers and their family) produced by Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2019-08-28

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019007
    Description:

    Not having a Social Insurance Number (SIN) and not filing taxes may represent challenges to access government programs and supports such as the Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG) and the Canada Learning Bond (CLB). Limited data availability has prevented a full assessment of the extent of these access challenges. This study attempts to address this knowledge gap by analyzing overall differences in SIN possession and tax-filing uptake by family income, levels of parental education, family type and Indigenous identity of the child and age of children using the 2016 Census data augmented with tax-filing and Social Insurance Number possession indicator flags.

    Release date: 2019-06-21

  • Table: 43-10-0012-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Number of immigrant tax filers, by province, admission year, sex, pre-admission experience and immigration category for tax years 1996 to 2016.

    Release date: 2018-12-24

  • Table: 11-10-0045-01
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration, Census metropolitan area part, Census agglomeration part
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Release date: 2018-02-16

  • Table: 11-10-0048-01
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration, Census metropolitan area part, Census agglomeration part
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Individuals; Selected characteristics of tax filers with capital gains (preliminary T1 Family File; T1FF).
    Release date: 2018-02-16

  • Table: 43-10-0035-01
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Number of immigrant tax filers, by province of landing, province of residence, sex, landing age group, immigrant admission category, landing year, for Canada, for tax years 1996 to 2015, annual (persons).

    Release date: 2017-11-27
Data (7)

Data (7) ((7 results))

Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (0 to 10 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202301100004
    Description: There is considerable policy interest in engaging hard-to-reach populations in Canada and integrating them into the tax system so they can receive the benefits intended to support them. Using the Longitudinal Immigration Database, this study provides insights into the tax-filing behaviour of newly landed immigrants and their families over time in Canada.
    Release date: 2023-11-22

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202332631084
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2023-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100500002
    Description:

    The financial resources available to families with young children are an important factor affecting child development, and they can have long-term impacts on socioeconomic outcomes in adulthood.

    This article summarizes the findings of a new study using Statistic Canada’s data and analyzes the effects of expanding child tax benefits on after-tax income among single mothers, in the context of the 2015 reform to the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) and the 2016 introduction of the Canada Child Benefit (CCB).

    Release date: 2021-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019008
    Description:

    The primary objective of this study is to describe the general income trends pre- and post-release for veterans released from the regular forces since 1998. It also provides some directions for future work. This study is part of the Life After Service Studies (LASS) research program. LASS is a partnership between Veterans Affairs Canada, the Department of National Defence and Statistics Canada. For this income study, information on veterans was linked to the T1 Family File (income data on tax filers and their family) produced by Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2019-08-28

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019007
    Description:

    Not having a Social Insurance Number (SIN) and not filing taxes may represent challenges to access government programs and supports such as the Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG) and the Canada Learning Bond (CLB). Limited data availability has prevented a full assessment of the extent of these access challenges. This study attempts to address this knowledge gap by analyzing overall differences in SIN possession and tax-filing uptake by family income, levels of parental education, family type and Indigenous identity of the child and age of children using the 2016 Census data augmented with tax-filing and Social Insurance Number possession indicator flags.

    Release date: 2019-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2007006
    Description:

    This study uses administrative tax data and the Survey of Financial Security to explore trends in the number and characteristics of high-income Canadians, as well as their wealth and effective income tax rates, from 1982 to 2004. The paper uses a range of thresholds to delineate high income and emphasizes statistics on the top 5%, 1%, 0.1% and 0.01% of tax filers.

    The study found that an individual income of $89,000 was needed to be counted among the top 5% if income recipients in 2004. A family income of $154,000 would place one in the top 5% of families. The growth in incomes at the high end has been quite rapid while incomes of the majority of the population remained stable. Compared with the U.S., Canada had significantly fewer high-income recipients in 2004, and their incomes were considerably less. Higher-income individuals tend to be middle aged married males that live in the larger urban centres. While women have made up a larger portion on the top 5% of tax filers since 1982, they have not made gains in the very highest income groups. High income Canadians have roughly the same share of total wealth as they do of total income.

    High income Canadians, in line with an increasing share of total income, have been paying an increasing share of total personal income taxes. Their share of total income increased from 21% to 25% between 1992 and 2004 while their share of income taxes paid increased from 30% to 36%. At the same time their effective tax rate dropped from 29% to 27%. Thus despite lower tax rates the increase in incomes was large enough, when combined with the progressive tax system, to result in an increased share of total taxes paid by high income Canadians. There is considerable heterogeneity in effective tax rates at the individual level with some high income individuals facing an effective tax rate of over 45%, while some pay as little as 10%. The proportion of tax filers, across the income distribution, who pay zero taxes decreased between 1992 and 2004.

    Release date: 2007-09-24

  • 7. The GST credit Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610613166
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The GST (goods and services tax) provided $30.6 billion to the federal government in 2003. Of this, $2.9 billion was paid back as a credit to taxfilers aged 16 and older based on their income. How many individuals receive the GST credit, and who are they? Does this credit help to redistribute income?

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006274
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We present new evidence on levels and trends in after-tax income inequality in Canada between 1980 and 2000. We argue that existing data sources may miss changes in the tails of the income distribution, and that much of the changes in the income distribution have been in the tails. Our data are constructed from Census files, which are augmented with predicted taxes based on information available from administrative tax data. After validating our approach in predicting taxes on the Census files, we document differences in the levels and trends in after-tax inequality between the newly constructed data source and the more commonly used survey data. We find that after-tax inequality levels are substantially higher based on the new data, primarily because income levels are lower at the bottom than in survey data. The new data show larger long-term increases in after-tax income inequality and far more variability over the economic cycle. This raises interesting questions about the role of the tax and transfer system in mitigating both trends and fluctuations in market income inequality.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510313137
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Local government revenues are increasingly perceived as inadequate to fund the program responsibilities of municipalities. Property taxes (residential and non-residential) are by far the most important revenue source, accounting for 35% in 2003 (up from 30% in 1988). But, residential property taxes are commonly viewed as regressive in relation to income. This study uses the 2001 Census of Population to quantify the regressiveness of residential property taxes in Canadian municipalities, and to examine whether regressive taxes are generally attributable to lower-income seniors living in high-priced homes.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20030017708
    Description:

    This article provides an overview of the work to date using GST data at Statistics Canada as direct replacement in imputation or estimation or as a data certification tool.

    Release date: 2005-01-26
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4301
    Description: This annual survey produced estimates of per-capita and aggregate amounts of personal and personal disposable income, of money income before and after tax, of income tax and direct taxes; estimates of aggregate wages and salaries, self-employment income, government transfer payments, investment income including rents, and miscellaneous money income.
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