Personal income

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All (271) (0 to 10 of 271 results)

Data (233)

Data (233) (0 to 10 of 233 results)

  • Table: 11-10-0232-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 206-0091)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Low income measure (LIM) thresholds by household size for market income, total income and after-tax income, in current and constant dollars, annual.

    Release date: 2020-02-24

  • Table: 11-10-0238-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 206-0051)
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Distribution of market, total and after-tax income of individuals, Canada, provinces and selected census metropolitan areas, annual.

    Release date: 2020-02-24

  • Table: 11-10-0239-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 206-0052)
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Income of individuals by age group, sex and income source, Canada, provinces and selected census metropolitan areas, annual.

    Release date: 2020-02-24

  • Table: 11-10-0240-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 206-0053)
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Distribution of employment income of individuals by sex and work activity, Canada, provinces and selected census metropolitan areas, annual.

    Release date: 2020-02-24

  • Table: 11-10-0059-01
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    The tables contain statistics describing how the income of taxfilers change, relative either to income they made in the past or to income made by other taxfilers. The first group of statistics illustrate absolute income mobility while the second group illustrate relative income mobility. This table provides five-year income mobility statistics. Table 11-10-0061 provides one-year mobility statistics.

    Release date: 2019-10-04

  • Table: 11-10-0061-01
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    The tables contains statistics describing how the income of taxfilers change, relative either to income they made in the past or to income made by other taxfilers. The first group of statistics illustrate absolute income mobility while the second group illustrate relative income mobility. The current table provides one-year income mobility statistics. Table 11-10-0059 provides five-year mobility statistics.

    Release date: 2019-10-04

  • Table: 37-10-0151-01
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Distribution of earners, by highest level of education and employment income, calculated from data collected in the 2016 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Table: 37-10-0152-01
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Average earnings, by age group and highest level of education, from the 2016 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2019006
    Description:

    This interactive tool allows users to visualize income data of tax filers and their dependants by sex and age for Canada, provinces/territories and census metropolitan area/census agglomeration. It shows the most recent data available from the Annual income estimates for Census families and individuals (T1 Family file).

    Release date: 2019-07-11

  • Table: 11-10-0008-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 111-0008)
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration, Census metropolitan area part, Census agglomeration part
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Individuals; Tax filers and dependants by total income, sex and age groups (final T1 Family File; T1FF).
    Release date: 2019-07-11
Analysis (28)

Analysis (28) (0 to 10 of 28 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201926621185
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-09-23

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201924021187
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-08-28

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019008
    Description:

    The primary objective of this study is to describe the general income trends pre- and post-release for veterans released from the regular forces since 1998. It also provides some directions for future work. This study is part of the Life After Service Studies (LASS) research program. LASS is a partnership between Veterans Affairs Canada, the Department of National Defence and Statistics Canada. For this income study, information on veterans was linked to the T1 Family File (income data on tax filers and their family) produced by Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2019-08-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017073
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides Canadian evidence of recent changes in intergenerational income mobility in Canada. The study uses a unique Canadian database that directly links children and parents. The analysis focuses on absolute income mobility—often seen as an indicator of economic opportunity in a society.

    Release date: 2017-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014362
    Description:

    The study examines the effects of cancer on the work status and annual earnings of cancer survivors who had a strong attachment to the labour market prior to their diagnosis. The comparison group consists of similar workers never diagnosed with cancer. The study is based on a Statistics Canada linkage file that combines microdata from the 1991 Census, the Canadian Cancer Registry, mortality records and personal income tax files. The study estimates changes in the magnitude of cancer effects during the first three years following the year of the diagnosis using a large sample of cancer survivors diagnosed at ages 25 to 61. The empirical strategy combines matching and regression models to deal with observed and unobserved differences between the cancer and comparison samples, and to improve causal inference.

    Release date: 2014-09-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2012343
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The financial security of widowed and divorced women during their retirement years has long been a concern. This paper places this issue within the context of research on replacement rates, the extent to which family income during the working years (here, the mid-50s) is "replaced" as individuals move into their late 70s. Using a longitudinal database and fixed-effects econometric models, the paper assesses the effect of widowhood/widowerhood and divorce after age 55 on replacement rates during the retirement years.

    Release date: 2012-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011339
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines how the risk of job loss and the short-term earnings losses of laid-off workers evolved between the late 1970s and the mid-2000s.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2009321
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Data from the Longitudinal Administrative Data (LAD) base are used to compare the retirement status and earnings replacement rates achieved by individuals who were, and individuals who were not, Registered Pension Plan members in 1991 and/or 1992, when they were in their mid-fifties. Among men in this cohort, the likelihood of being retired at age 70 to 72 was about 4 to 14 percentage points higher among pension plan members than non-members. Data used for the study do not provide information on why RPP non-members tend to retire later than do members. Among retired individuals, earnings replacement rates did not differ significantly between RPP members and non-members.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M2007018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines the distribution of literacy skills in the Canadian economy and the ways in which they are generated. In large part, the generation of literacy skills has to do with formal schooling and parental inputs into their children's education. The nature of literacy generation in the years after individuals have left formal schooling and are in the labour market is also investigated. Once the core facts about literacy in the economy have been established, the study turns to examining the impact of increased literacy on individual earnings. Both the causal impact of literacy on earnings and the joint distribution of literacy and income are explored. The authors argue that the latter provides a more complete measure of how well an individual is able to function in society.

    The study focuses mainly on data from the Canadian component of the 2003 International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS), composed of a sample of over 22,000 respondents. The Canadian component of the 1994 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) is also used in order to obtain a more complete picture of how literacy changes with age and across birth cohorts.

    Release date: 2007-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007302
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The high-tech sector was a major driving force behind the Canadian economic recovery of the late 1990s. It is well known that the tide began to turn quite suddenly in 2001 when sector-wide employment and earnings halted this upward trend, despite continued gains in the rest of the economy. As informative as employment and earnings statistics may be, they do not paint a complete picture of the severity of the high-tech meltdown. A decline in employment may result from reduced hiring and natural attrition, as opposed to layoffs, while a decline in earnings among high-tech workers says little about the fortunes of laid-off workers who did not regain employment in the high-tech sector. In this study, I use a unique administrative data source to address both of these gaps in our knowledge of the high-tech meltdown. Specifically, the study explores permanent layoffs in the high-tech sector, as well as earnings losses of laid-off high-tech workers. The findings suggest that the high-tech meltdown resulted in a sudden and dramatic increase in the probability of experiencing a permanent layoff, which more than quadrupled in the manufacturing sector from 2000 to 2001. Ottawa-Gatineau workers in the industry were hit particularly hard on this front, as the permanent layoff rate rose by a factor of 11 from 2000 to 2001. Moreover, laid-off manufacturing high-tech workers who found a new job saw a very steep decline in earnings. This decline in earnings was well above the declines registered among any other groups of laid-off workers, including workers who were laid off during the "jobless recovery" of the 1990s. Among laid-off high-tech workers who found a new job, about four out of five did not locate employment in high-tech, and about one out of three moved to another city. In Ottawa-Gatineau, many former high-tech employees found jobs in the federal government. However, about two in five laid-off high-tech workers left the city.

    Release date: 2007-07-20
Reference (7)

Reference (7) ((7 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3501
    Description: The purpose of this survey was to provide data for estimating income distributions by size for individuals and families.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3502
    Description: This survey was conducted to provide data on cross-sectional income for the Canadian population and data on low income families in Canada.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3508
    Description: The main purpose of the survey is to obtain detailed information about household spending as well as limited information on dwelling characteristics and household equipment.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3889
    Description: At the heart of the survey's objectives is the understanding of the economic well-being of Canadians: what economic shifts do individuals and families live through, and how does it vary with changes in their paid work, family make-up, receipt of government transfers or other factors?

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4105
    Description: This activity is conducted for the development and dissemination of annual small area income data for Canadians.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4301
    Description: This annual survey produced estimates of per-capita and aggregate amounts of personal and personal disposable income, of money income before and after tax, of income tax and direct taxes; estimates of aggregate wages and salaries, self-employment income, government transfer payments, investment income including rents, and miscellaneous money income.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5200
    Description: The Canadian Income Survey (CIS) is a cross-sectional survey developed to provide a portrait of the income and income sources of Canadians, with their individual and household characteristics.
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