Other content related to Household and family assets, debts and wealth

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  • 11-22-0002
    Description:

    Understanding the health of household finances is a complex issue that generates considerable discussion. A new research series at Statistics Canada is contributing to this discussion by examining differences in indebtedness and wealth among higher and lower income families and in different areas of the country. Using data from the Survey of Financial Security (SFS), the analysis looks at the evolution of debt and wealth from 1999 to 2016, highlighting major differences in housing equity and growing disparities in financial outcomes.

    This webinar examines the following issues: Are families living in major metropolitan areas wealthier? To what extent do families living in cities with higher housing prices carry more debt? Are millennials more indebted than previous generations of young Canadians? Are Canadian seniors more likely to carry mortgage and consumer debt than before? How much more debt are they carrying? How have wealth and debt evolved among immigrant families? And how does this differ from Canadian-born families?

    https://www.statcan.gc.ca/eng/services/webinars/11220002

    Release date: 2019-05-30

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201910820384
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019006
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines economic well-being of millennials by comparing their household balance sheets to those of previous generations of young Canadians.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019029
    Description:

    This infographic examines economic wellbeing for millennials (those between 25 and 34 years old in 2016) and provides a comparison with generation X at the same age (those between 25 and 34 years old in 1999). Information is provided on income, assets, debts and net worth.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00042019002
    Description:

    A recent study compares financial outcomes for millennials and generation X when they were younger. A short video provides a quick overview of key points, examining how millennials are doing in terms of wealth and debt levels. It also highlights disparities in wealth among their generation.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Table: 11-10-0016-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 205-0002)
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Assets and debts held by family units and by age groups, total amounts.

    Release date: 2017-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114134
    Description:

    This study compares the wealth holdings of family units covered by workplace pension plans with those of other family units. It focuses on families and unattached individuals who had no significant business equity and whose major income recipient was aged 30 to 54 and employed as a paid worker. The paper also examines whether wealth differences observed between families with registered pension plan (RPP) assets and other families persist when key sociodemographic differences between the two populations are taken into account.

    Release date: 2015-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200311690
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canadians accumulate wealth to deal with unforeseen circumstances, fund their children's education, invest in business opportunities and fund their retirement, among other reasons. Wealth is therefore a key indicator of household financial well-being. However, the financial and housing markets in which households invest have changed substantially. This study develops a synthetic cohort approach to examine the effect of these changes on the wealth accumulation of successive generations of Canadians' with a particular focus on younger households.

    Release date: 2012-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211455
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Some households provide money, goods and services directly to help other households: these interhousehold transfers add up to a sizeable flow of economic resources between households. While measured by Statistics Canada surveys, voluntary interhousehold transfers are not included in the recipient household's total income. This article examines the conceptual and measurement issues related to voluntary interhousehold transfers, and provides a profile of voluntary interhousehold transfers in Canada. It uses recent data on interhousehold transfers from income, expenditure and wealth surveys.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 13F0026M
    Description:

    The papers in this series are based on the Survey of Financial Security which is a study of what families own (assets) and what they owe (debts). Various topics are covered by this survey, such as the value of family assets (home; other property; vehicles; bank accounts; term deposits; life insurance; and investments in registered savings plans, bonds, mutual funds, stocks, etc.), the amount of family debts (amount owed on mortgages, car loans, credit cards, other charge accounts, student loans, etc.), major on-going expenses for housing and child care, and any employer pensions plans that members of the family belong to. Information is also available on the demographic, employment, income and educational characteristics of family members. This research paper series covers various topics relating to survey content, concepts and operations.

    Release date: 2010-03-26
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 11-10-0016-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 205-0002)
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Assets and debts held by family units and by age groups, total amounts.

    Release date: 2017-12-08

  • Profile of a community or region: 94F0048X
    Description:

    These profiles provide a statistical overview of Canada, presenting most of the univariate census variables for various levels of geography. The data for the census variables were collected from a 20% sample of the population, with the exception of the data for the age, sex and marital status variables, which were collected from the total population.

    Release date: 2005-04-26

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013568
    Description:

    Many governments have adopted policies aimed at reducing public debt. Although the long-run fiscal dividends of such policies largely depend on the size of the debt-to-GDP cut, the short and medium run effects are more dependent on the type and speed of measures taken.

    Release date: 1998-02-04
Analysis (16)

Analysis (16) (0 to 10 of 16 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201910820384
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019006
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines economic well-being of millennials by comparing their household balance sheets to those of previous generations of young Canadians.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019029
    Description:

    This infographic examines economic wellbeing for millennials (those between 25 and 34 years old in 2016) and provides a comparison with generation X at the same age (those between 25 and 34 years old in 1999). Information is provided on income, assets, debts and net worth.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00042019002
    Description:

    A recent study compares financial outcomes for millennials and generation X when they were younger. A short video provides a quick overview of key points, examining how millennials are doing in terms of wealth and debt levels. It also highlights disparities in wealth among their generation.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114134
    Description:

    This study compares the wealth holdings of family units covered by workplace pension plans with those of other family units. It focuses on families and unattached individuals who had no significant business equity and whose major income recipient was aged 30 to 54 and employed as a paid worker. The paper also examines whether wealth differences observed between families with registered pension plan (RPP) assets and other families persist when key sociodemographic differences between the two populations are taken into account.

    Release date: 2015-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200311690
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canadians accumulate wealth to deal with unforeseen circumstances, fund their children's education, invest in business opportunities and fund their retirement, among other reasons. Wealth is therefore a key indicator of household financial well-being. However, the financial and housing markets in which households invest have changed substantially. This study develops a synthetic cohort approach to examine the effect of these changes on the wealth accumulation of successive generations of Canadians' with a particular focus on younger households.

    Release date: 2012-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211455
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Some households provide money, goods and services directly to help other households: these interhousehold transfers add up to a sizeable flow of economic resources between households. While measured by Statistics Canada surveys, voluntary interhousehold transfers are not included in the recipient household's total income. This article examines the conceptual and measurement issues related to voluntary interhousehold transfers, and provides a profile of voluntary interhousehold transfers in Canada. It uses recent data on interhousehold transfers from income, expenditure and wealth surveys.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 13F0026M
    Description:

    The papers in this series are based on the Survey of Financial Security which is a study of what families own (assets) and what they owe (debts). Various topics are covered by this survey, such as the value of family assets (home; other property; vehicles; bank accounts; term deposits; life insurance; and investments in registered savings plans, bonds, mutual funds, stocks, etc.), the amount of family debts (amount owed on mortgages, car loans, credit cards, other charge accounts, student loans, etc.), major on-going expenses for housing and child care, and any employer pensions plans that members of the family belong to. Information is also available on the demographic, employment, income and educational characteristics of family members. This research paper series covers various topics relating to survey content, concepts and operations.

    Release date: 2010-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510313138
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The national savings rate has been oscillating around historic lows for several years, prompting concerns about the resilience of a macro-level economy increasingly reliant on debt-financed consumer spending. Many are also troubled by the balance sheets of households, where ever-expanding debt has rapidly outpaced earnings growth. The resulting record-high, debt-to-income ratios leave households more vulnerable to interruptions in income. This article examines changes in saving and spending patterns over 20 years, and differences in the characteristics and spending patterns of saving versus spending households.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003197
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The economic assimilation of immigrants is a key concern for economists and policy makers. The topic has been widely explored in terms of earnings assimilation of immigrants. Using the 1999 Survey of Financial Security, this study attempts to look at the issue from the wealth perspective.

    Among married families, immigrants have higher wealth than their native-born counterparts from the 40th to 90th percentiles of the distribution, with the wealth gap ranging between $20,000 and $78,000. Among single families, immigrants have higher wealth from the 55th to 95th percentiles, with the wealth gap ranging between $14,000 and $145,000. At the bottom of the distribution, however, evidence suggests that immigrants have lower wealth, although the gap is generally below $10,000. Various decomposition results indicate that the age of the major income recipient (and of the spouse for married families) as well as factors affecting permanent income explain a significant portion of the wealth gap in cases where immigrant families have higher wealth than the native-born. At the bottom of the wealth distribution, however, the wealth gap cannot be explained by the age of the major income recipient, permanent income factors, or family size (or lone-parent status), suggesting that low-wealth immigrant families may behave differently than low-wealth Canadian-born families in their wealth accumulation process.

    The wealth gap is also studied from a cohort perspective. Not surprisingly, recent immigrants have lower wealth than comparable Canadian-born families, and immigrants who arrived before 1976 have higher wealth. While immigrants who arrived in Canada between 1976 and 1985 are widely believed to initially have had more of an earnings disadvantage than their predecessors with respect to the Canadian-born, this study finds that, over the upper segment of the distribution, the wealth of this cohort is not significantly different from that of comparable Canadian-born families. But over the lower portion of the distribution, the cohort has lower wealth.

    Release date: 2003-11-18
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2007001
    Description:

    This guide will be of assistance when using the public use microdata file (PUMF) of the Survey of Financial Security (SFS) conducted by the Pensions and Wealth Surveys Section of the Income Statistics Division.

    Release date: 2007-09-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1993017
    Description:

    This report presents the results of the May 1993 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) test as they relate to the wealth items, at the individual level and at the family level.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5159
    Description: The intention of the survey is to collect information that will illuminate the degree of knowledge that Canadians have concerning financial decision-making.
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