Socioeconomic conditions and health

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  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20060029294
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This newsletter article presents results from a population-based study of birth outcomes in Quebec from 1991 to 2000. Rates of adverse birth outcomes increased across successively poorer neighbourhood income groups, and across successively lower levels of maternal education, for five outcomes: preterm birth, small-for-gestational-age birth, stillbirth, neonatal death, and postneonatal death.

    Release date: 2006-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19970043686
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description: This article examines differences in health status and health determinants between residents of the North (Yukon and Northwest Territories) and of the provinces, and between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal territorial residents. The use of health services and medications is also analyzed.
    Release date: 1998-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950022508
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The positive relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and longevity has long been established. Comparable evidence exists for SES and morbidity, but observations of this relationship tend to be limited to specific health indicators. In this article, a comprehensive quantitative measure of health status, the Health Utility Index (HUI), is applied to an analysis of the relationship between SES the health status of people aged 25 and over in Ontario. The HUI, based on a set of questions included in the 1990 Ontario Health Survey (OHS), provides a summary index of the health of each respondent. The OHS data show that lower levels of education, income, and occupation are associated with lower HUI values. Health status differences across SES groups are greater in late middle-age than at younger or older ages, a pattern consistent with the findings of other studies. The development of summary indicators like the HUI is part of a larger effort to construct measures for monitoring the health of Canadians.

    Release date: 1995-11-20
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  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20060029294
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This newsletter article presents results from a population-based study of birth outcomes in Quebec from 1991 to 2000. Rates of adverse birth outcomes increased across successively poorer neighbourhood income groups, and across successively lower levels of maternal education, for five outcomes: preterm birth, small-for-gestational-age birth, stillbirth, neonatal death, and postneonatal death.

    Release date: 2006-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19970043686
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description: This article examines differences in health status and health determinants between residents of the North (Yukon and Northwest Territories) and of the provinces, and between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal territorial residents. The use of health services and medications is also analyzed.
    Release date: 1998-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950022508
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The positive relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and longevity has long been established. Comparable evidence exists for SES and morbidity, but observations of this relationship tend to be limited to specific health indicators. In this article, a comprehensive quantitative measure of health status, the Health Utility Index (HUI), is applied to an analysis of the relationship between SES the health status of people aged 25 and over in Ontario. The HUI, based on a set of questions included in the 1990 Ontario Health Survey (OHS), provides a summary index of the health of each respondent. The OHS data show that lower levels of education, income, and occupation are associated with lower HUI values. Health status differences across SES groups are greater in late middle-age than at younger or older ages, a pattern consistent with the findings of other studies. The development of summary indicators like the HUI is part of a larger effort to construct measures for monitoring the health of Canadians.

    Release date: 1995-11-20
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