Marriage and common-law unions

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

2 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (14)

All (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019035
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2017 General Social Survey on Family is to explore the characteristics of families in Canada and to monitor changes in these characteristics over time. Using information on the conjugal history of respondents, this infographic examines the proportion and the characteristics of people in Canada aged 35 to 64 years old who are currently in their second or subsequent marriage or common-law relationship.

    Release date: 2019-05-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201912120471
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-05-01

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019031
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2017 General Social Survey on Family is to explore the characteristics of Canadian families and monitor changes in these characteristics over time. Using information on the conjugal history of respondents, this infographic examines the proportion and the characteristics of people in Canada aged 25 to 64 years old who are currently married or in a common-law union.

    Release date: 2019-05-01

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019019
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2017 General Social Survey on Family is to explore the characteristics of Canadian families and monitor changes in these characteristics over time. Using information on the conjugal and parental history of respondents, this infographic examines the proportion and the characteristics of people in Canada aged 55 and older whose current relationship (marriage or common-law) was long-lasting, that is, had been ongoing for 30 years or more.

    Release date: 2019-03-13

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019014
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the 2017 General Social Survey on families; more specifically people aged 25 -64 years old and who reported being in a couple relationship with someone not living in their household.

    Release date: 2019-02-20

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20140559303
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111904
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Census of Population and 2011 General Social Survey in order to examine the conjugal histories and living arrangements for current seniors, defined as individuals aged at least 65, and "future seniors", defined as individuals aged 55 to 64.

    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111771
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many individuals are not married or in a common-law relationship, but are in a stable relationship without living under the same roof. These couples are 'living apart together.' How many individuals are in this situation in Canada? Is this type of relationship increasing? Are these relationships motivated by lifestyle choices?

    Release date: 2013-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110659
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    About 40 years ago, marriage was very popular: most children were born to, and grew up with, married parents. That has changed. Divorce has risen sharply, common-law unions have become more and more popular, and many children are born outside of marriage. Others, at a young age, see their parents divorce.

    Release date: 2008-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017961
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Research consistently shows that delaying marriage tends to increase the likelihood that a person will never marry. After age 30, a single person may not wish to marry; it may seem less feasible or less desirable than it did when they were younger.

    This article looks at "mature singles," that is, men and women older than the average age at which people first marry (28 for women, 30 for men) but not yet past prime working-age (under 55). These men and women numbered over 1.1 million in 2001; they had never legally married and were not living common-law at the time of the survey. More than half a million of them did not think they would ever get married. The article examines some of the differences between those mature singles who do not expect to marry and those who do.

    Release date: 2005-06-07
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

Analysis (13)

Analysis (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019035
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2017 General Social Survey on Family is to explore the characteristics of families in Canada and to monitor changes in these characteristics over time. Using information on the conjugal history of respondents, this infographic examines the proportion and the characteristics of people in Canada aged 35 to 64 years old who are currently in their second or subsequent marriage or common-law relationship.

    Release date: 2019-05-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201912120471
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-05-01

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019031
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2017 General Social Survey on Family is to explore the characteristics of Canadian families and monitor changes in these characteristics over time. Using information on the conjugal history of respondents, this infographic examines the proportion and the characteristics of people in Canada aged 25 to 64 years old who are currently married or in a common-law union.

    Release date: 2019-05-01

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019019
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2017 General Social Survey on Family is to explore the characteristics of Canadian families and monitor changes in these characteristics over time. Using information on the conjugal and parental history of respondents, this infographic examines the proportion and the characteristics of people in Canada aged 55 and older whose current relationship (marriage or common-law) was long-lasting, that is, had been ongoing for 30 years or more.

    Release date: 2019-03-13

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019014
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the 2017 General Social Survey on families; more specifically people aged 25 -64 years old and who reported being in a couple relationship with someone not living in their household.

    Release date: 2019-02-20

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20140559303
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111904
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Census of Population and 2011 General Social Survey in order to examine the conjugal histories and living arrangements for current seniors, defined as individuals aged at least 65, and "future seniors", defined as individuals aged 55 to 64.

    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111771
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many individuals are not married or in a common-law relationship, but are in a stable relationship without living under the same roof. These couples are 'living apart together.' How many individuals are in this situation in Canada? Is this type of relationship increasing? Are these relationships motivated by lifestyle choices?

    Release date: 2013-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110659
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    About 40 years ago, marriage was very popular: most children were born to, and grew up with, married parents. That has changed. Divorce has risen sharply, common-law unions have become more and more popular, and many children are born outside of marriage. Others, at a young age, see their parents divorce.

    Release date: 2008-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017961
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Research consistently shows that delaying marriage tends to increase the likelihood that a person will never marry. After age 30, a single person may not wish to marry; it may seem less feasible or less desirable than it did when they were younger.

    This article looks at "mature singles," that is, men and women older than the average age at which people first marry (28 for women, 30 for men) but not yet past prime working-age (under 55). These men and women numbered over 1.1 million in 2001; they had never legally married and were not living common-law at the time of the survey. More than half a million of them did not think they would ever get married. The article examines some of the differences between those mature singles who do not expect to marry and those who do.

    Release date: 2005-06-07
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: