Marriage and common-law unions

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All (277) (270 to 280 of 277 results)

  • Table: 95F0189X1996002
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-01-14

  • Table: 95F0189X1996003
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-01-14

  • Table: 95F0189X1996005
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 1998-01-14

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19960004869
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report, using data on common-law unions from the censuses and the most recent General Social Surveys, presents an update of our knowledge on the number and characteristics of people who choose to live in common-law unions. As a report, it remains incomplete, and represents but a few more pages in a continuing story.

    Release date: 1997-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19960022830
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1994, a total of 159,959 marriages were performed in Canada, up only slightly from 159,316 the year before. This small increase had no effect on the crude marriage rate, which remained at 5.5 marriages per 1,000 population. Aside from a brief upturn in the late 1980s, Canada's marriage rate has fallen quite steadily since the early 1970s. The overall decline is also evident when rates are disaggregated by the prior marital status of the bride and groom (single, divorced or widowed). Since 1974, the average ages of brides and grooms have risen about five years to 30.1 and 32.6, respectively. Nonetheless, the peak ages for marriage are the twenties. In this age range, women's marriage rates exceed those of men, but at older ages, men's rates are higher. And at progressively older ages, a growing proportion of grooms have brides at least 10 years their junior. The marriage patterns of Quebec residents differ from those of other Canadians. Quebec residents are much more likely to remain single or live common-law, and if they do marry, they are slightly more likely to divorce. Once divorced or widowed, people in Quebec are less likely than those in the rest of Canada to remarry. This article is based on data compiled by Statistics Canada from marriage registration forms provided by the central Vital Statistics Registry in each province and territory.

    Release date: 1996-11-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3232
    Description: This is an administrative survey that collects demographic information annually from all provincial and territorial vital statistics registries on all marriages in Canada.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3901
    Description: The census provides a detailed statistical portrait of Canada and its people by their demographic, social and economic characteristics. This information is important for communities and is vital for planning services such as child care, schooling, family services, and skills training for employment.
Data (234)

Data (234) (0 to 10 of 234 results)

Analysis (40)

Analysis (40) (0 to 10 of 40 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019035
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2017 General Social Survey on Family is to explore the characteristics of families in Canada and to monitor changes in these characteristics over time. Using information on the conjugal history of respondents, this infographic examines the proportion and the characteristics of people in Canada aged 35 to 64 years old who are currently in their second or subsequent marriage or common-law relationship.

    Release date: 2019-05-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201912120471
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-05-01

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019031
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2017 General Social Survey on Family is to explore the characteristics of Canadian families and monitor changes in these characteristics over time. Using information on the conjugal history of respondents, this infographic examines the proportion and the characteristics of people in Canada aged 25 to 64 years old who are currently married or in a common-law union.

    Release date: 2019-05-01

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019019
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2017 General Social Survey on Family is to explore the characteristics of Canadian families and monitor changes in these characteristics over time. Using information on the conjugal and parental history of respondents, this infographic examines the proportion and the characteristics of people in Canada aged 55 and older whose current relationship (marriage or common-law) was long-lasting, that is, had been ongoing for 30 years or more.

    Release date: 2019-03-13

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019014
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the 2017 General Social Survey on families; more specifically people aged 25 -64 years old and who reported being in a couple relationship with someone not living in their household.

    Release date: 2019-02-20

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016007
    Description:

    This article in the Census in Brief series paints a demographic picture of same-sex couples in Canada in 2016. It includes the number of same-sex couples, the sex distribution, the place of residence (urban or rural), the conjugal status (married or common-law) and the presence of children.

    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • Stats in brief: 99-010-X201100314034
    Description:

    These three short articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) analytical document on immigration and ethnocultural diversity in Canada. They focus on specific topics of interest. The first NHS in Brief is entitled Generation status: Canadian-born children of immigrants, the second, Obtaining Canadian citizenship and the third, Mixed unions in Canada.

    Release date: 2014-06-17

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20140559303
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111904
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Census of Population and 2011 General Social Survey in order to examine the conjugal histories and living arrangements for current seniors, defined as individuals aged at least 65, and "future seniors", defined as individuals aged 55 to 64.

    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201300111788
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article analyses patterns related to marital status and nuptiality in Canada. Data on marital and conjugal status come primarily from the 2011 Census of Population, with comparisons to historical data where appropriate, particularly 1981. In addition, data from the Canadian Vital Statistics Database on marriage and divorce are also analysed, with an emphasis on recent trends.

    Release date: 2013-07-09
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-380-X
    Description:

    This report focuses on five demographic variables: date of birth, age, sex, marital status and common-law status. The report describes how the data were collected, verified, processed, edited and imputed. The final section covers how the data were evaluated.

    Release date: 2003-10-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3232
    Description: This is an administrative survey that collects demographic information annually from all provincial and territorial vital statistics registries on all marriages in Canada.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3901
    Description: The census provides a detailed statistical portrait of Canada and its people by their demographic, social and economic characteristics. This information is important for communities and is vital for planning services such as child care, schooling, family services, and skills training for employment.
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