Marriage and common-law unions

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (29)

All (29) (0 to 10 of 29 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111904
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Census of Population and 2011 General Social Survey in order to examine the conjugal histories and living arrangements for current seniors, defined as individuals aged at least 65, and "future seniors", defined as individuals aged 55 to 64.

    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201300111788
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article analyses patterns related to marital status and nuptiality in Canada. Data on marital and conjugal status come primarily from the 2011 Census of Population, with comparisons to historical data where appropriate, particularly 1981. In addition, data from the Canadian Vital Statistics Database on marriage and divorce are also analysed, with an emphasis on recent trends.

    Release date: 2013-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111771
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many individuals are not married or in a common-law relationship, but are in a stable relationship without living under the same roof. These couples are 'living apart together.' How many individuals are in this situation in Canada? Is this type of relationship increasing? Are these relationships motivated by lifestyle choices?

    Release date: 2013-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 98-312-X2011001
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This 2011 Census analytical document presents key trends emerging from the analysis of families, household and marital status data in Canada, provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas (CMAs), census agglomerations (CAs), regions located outside CMAs and CAs, and municipalities.

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011335
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, the income management strategies of Canadian couples are examined using data from the 2007 General Social Survey. The extent to which "older" couples, in which at least one spouse or partner is aged 45 or older, employ an allocative, pooled, or separate strategy is explored. Results show that the income management strategies used by these couples are correlated with relationship characteristics, such as common-law status, duration of relationship, and the presence of children. As well, the likelihood of using a separate approach is positively correlated with levels of educational attainment and with the amount of income received by wives or female partners.

    Release date: 2011-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211335
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Women have made substantial gains in education over the last few decades and are now more likely to have a university degree than men. At the same time, the conjugal situation of female university graduates has changed considerably. Using data from the 1981 to 2006 Censuses, this article examines how the propensity to form unions (marriage or common-law) has changed for women with university degrees compared to those without a university education. It also compares the incidence of female university graduates forming unions with similarly educated males over time.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111143
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    As Canada's population continues to become ethnoculturally diverse, there is greater opportunity for individuals to form conjugal relationships with someone from a different ethnocultural background. In this study, a mixed union, either marital or common-law, is based on one of two criteria: either one member of a couple belongs to a visible minority group and the other does not; or the couple belongs to different visible minority groups. Using data primarily from the 2006 Census of Population, this study examines the socio-demographic characteristics of mixed union couples in Canada. Studying mixed unions is important not only because these relationships reflect another aspect of the diversity of families today, but also for their implications in terms of social inclusion and identification with one or more visible minority groups, particularly for subsequent generations.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110659
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    About 40 years ago, marriage was very popular: most children were born to, and grew up with, married parents. That has changed. Divorce has risen sharply, common-law unions have become more and more popular, and many children are born outside of marriage. Others, at a young age, see their parents divorce.

    Release date: 2008-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810413208
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Throughout much of the last century, older couples faced only one retirement decision -- the husband's. However, the dramatic rise and sustained participation of women in the paid labour force since the 1970s transformed the retirement transitions of married couples; increasingly, couples had to make two decisions and balance the preferences and constraints of partners who both made substantial contributions to household income. This article looks at the extent to which spouses synchronize the timing of their retirements, the factors associated with taking one or another pathway into retirement and changes in patterns of retirement through the 1990s.

    Release date: 2008-06-18
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (29)

Analysis (29) (0 to 10 of 29 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111904
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Census of Population and 2011 General Social Survey in order to examine the conjugal histories and living arrangements for current seniors, defined as individuals aged at least 65, and "future seniors", defined as individuals aged 55 to 64.

    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201300111788
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article analyses patterns related to marital status and nuptiality in Canada. Data on marital and conjugal status come primarily from the 2011 Census of Population, with comparisons to historical data where appropriate, particularly 1981. In addition, data from the Canadian Vital Statistics Database on marriage and divorce are also analysed, with an emphasis on recent trends.

    Release date: 2013-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111771
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many individuals are not married or in a common-law relationship, but are in a stable relationship without living under the same roof. These couples are 'living apart together.' How many individuals are in this situation in Canada? Is this type of relationship increasing? Are these relationships motivated by lifestyle choices?

    Release date: 2013-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 98-312-X2011001
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This 2011 Census analytical document presents key trends emerging from the analysis of families, household and marital status data in Canada, provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas (CMAs), census agglomerations (CAs), regions located outside CMAs and CAs, and municipalities.

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011335
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, the income management strategies of Canadian couples are examined using data from the 2007 General Social Survey. The extent to which "older" couples, in which at least one spouse or partner is aged 45 or older, employ an allocative, pooled, or separate strategy is explored. Results show that the income management strategies used by these couples are correlated with relationship characteristics, such as common-law status, duration of relationship, and the presence of children. As well, the likelihood of using a separate approach is positively correlated with levels of educational attainment and with the amount of income received by wives or female partners.

    Release date: 2011-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211335
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Women have made substantial gains in education over the last few decades and are now more likely to have a university degree than men. At the same time, the conjugal situation of female university graduates has changed considerably. Using data from the 1981 to 2006 Censuses, this article examines how the propensity to form unions (marriage or common-law) has changed for women with university degrees compared to those without a university education. It also compares the incidence of female university graduates forming unions with similarly educated males over time.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111143
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    As Canada's population continues to become ethnoculturally diverse, there is greater opportunity for individuals to form conjugal relationships with someone from a different ethnocultural background. In this study, a mixed union, either marital or common-law, is based on one of two criteria: either one member of a couple belongs to a visible minority group and the other does not; or the couple belongs to different visible minority groups. Using data primarily from the 2006 Census of Population, this study examines the socio-demographic characteristics of mixed union couples in Canada. Studying mixed unions is important not only because these relationships reflect another aspect of the diversity of families today, but also for their implications in terms of social inclusion and identification with one or more visible minority groups, particularly for subsequent generations.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110659
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    About 40 years ago, marriage was very popular: most children were born to, and grew up with, married parents. That has changed. Divorce has risen sharply, common-law unions have become more and more popular, and many children are born outside of marriage. Others, at a young age, see their parents divorce.

    Release date: 2008-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810413208
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Throughout much of the last century, older couples faced only one retirement decision -- the husband's. However, the dramatic rise and sustained participation of women in the paid labour force since the 1970s transformed the retirement transitions of married couples; increasingly, couples had to make two decisions and balance the preferences and constraints of partners who both made substantial contributions to household income. This article looks at the extent to which spouses synchronize the timing of their retirements, the factors associated with taking one or another pathway into retirement and changes in patterns of retirement through the 1990s.

    Release date: 2008-06-18
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: