Adult learning

Key indicators

Selected geographical area: Canada

More adult learning indicators

Selected geographical area: Canada

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help

Results

All (57)

All (57) (0 to 10 of 57 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201620114821
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-07-19

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20122776362
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200211652
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study investigates job-related training of Canadian employees age 55 to 64. Using the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS) and several cycles of the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS), it compares the training of older and core-age workers and tracks changes in the incidence and correlates of training over time.

    Release date: 2012-04-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-604-X
    Description:

    Literacy for Life, is the second report from the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey. It presents additional results on the nature and magnitude of the literacy gaps faced by OECD countries and how these gaps have evolved over the medium term.

    It offers new insights into the factors that influence the formation of adult skills in various settings - at home and at work - for the eleven countries participating in the first and last round of data collection between 2003 and 2008. The study offers comparative evidence on the impact of various factors on the supply of skill. The study offers a special focus on numeracy skills and problem solving skills. It explores the relationships between numeracy and key socio-demographic factors as well as labour market outcomes and earnings.

    It highlights the importance of problem solving skills by defining this foundational skill and by exploring its determinants as well as its relative role in influencing important labour market outcomes.

    The report offers also an analysis of performance across multiple skill domains. It investigates the skill profiles of various population groups defined in terms of the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of those who score at levels deemed to be low in one or more skill domains and explores the resulting consequences.

    The report concludes by investigating the issue of skill mismatch in the labour market and its relationship to adult learning. The extent and distribution of mismatch between the day to day literacy related requirements of workers and the literacy skills they have obtained is an important issue that is being explored in this study.

    Release date: 2011-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211493
    Description:

    According to the 2008 Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), nearly 8 million adults between the ages of 25 and 64 took part in formal training activities or education between July 2007 and June 2008, and most of them did so for career- or job-related reasons. This article examines the participation of adult workers in formal, job-related training activities or education. The participation rates of adult workers are analyzed in relation to their demographic characteristics, occupation, employer characteristics, training objectives and learning obstacles.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Public use microdata: 81M0019X
    Description:

    The Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS) addresses issues relating to antecedents and determinants to access to Post Secondary Education (PSE). It provides an holistic approach to collecting information on participation in and financing of education and training in Canada within the context of lifelong learning.

    The Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS) brings together three previously conducted surveys: The Survey of Approaches to Educational Planning (SAEP), the Post-secondary Education Participation Survey (PEPS) and the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS).

    Release date: 2010-09-03

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900611126
    Description:

    Lifelong learning is increasingly recognized as an important element in today's knowledge-based economy defined by rapid advancements in technology and constantly changing skill needs. Lifelong learning is supported by both formal education and training. Information on the participation of Canadian adults in education and training activities is provided by the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) 2003 and the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS) 2008. This article highlights some of the key findings of a recent Statistics Canada report that examined trends in adult education and training, based on data from these two surveys.

    Release date: 2010-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009079
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report is based on the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), which was undertaken by Statistics Canada in partnership with Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The ASETS brings together three previous education surveys that covered specific population groups: 1) the Survey of Approaches to Educational Planning (SAEP), which focused on 0 to 18 year olds; 2) the Post-Secondary Education Participation Survey (PEPS), which focused on 18 to 24 year olds; and 3) the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS), which focused on 25 to 65 year olds. While these three surveys examined specific facets of Canadian's educational experience, their integration in the ASETS allows for a more holistic approach to collecting information on participation in and financing of education and training in Canada. While the ASETS can be used to undertake the same research as the PEPS, AETS and SAEP, it can also be used to address additional research not previously possible.

    The ASETS results presented in this report refer to activities undertaken between July 2007 and June 2008 reference period.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-595-M2009071
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This document outlines the definitions and the typology now used by Statistics Canada's Centre for Education Statistics to identify, classify and delineate the universities, colleges and other providers of postsecondary and adult education in Canada for which basic enrolments, graduates, professors and finance statistics are produced.

    These new rigorous definitions were needed to capture the growing complexity of postsecondary education in Canada. They differentiate the various types of postsecondary institutions, address the blurring distinction between colleges and universities and handle the various forms of possible relationships between institutions.

    The document brings closure to the extensive consultation that took place between January 2003 and the spring of 2007 as it summarizes the changes made following the 2004 paper entitled "A New Understanding of Post-secondary Education in Canada: A Discussion Paper".

    Such an extensive consultation was deemed necessary to ensure that the typology is useful to the whole sector and that it allows comparisons between provinces and territories despite the significant differences of their respective postsecondary education systems.

    Release date: 2009-01-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800210644
    Description:

    This article provides information on employer-sponsored training in Canada. It examines the reasons for participating in adult education and training, the labour force status of participants, the impact of job and workplace characteristics on adult learning and the relationship between skills match-mismatch and participation in adult learning. The findings summarized here are based on analysis of data from the 1994 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), undertaken in 1994, and the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), undertaken in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)). The analysis is provided from an international perspective, with the situation in Canada being compared to that of three other countries - Norway, Switzerland and the United States.

    Release date: 2008-06-16
Data (4)

Data (4) ((4 results))

  • Public use microdata: 81M0019X
    Description:

    The Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS) addresses issues relating to antecedents and determinants to access to Post Secondary Education (PSE). It provides an holistic approach to collecting information on participation in and financing of education and training in Canada within the context of lifelong learning.

    The Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS) brings together three previously conducted surveys: The Survey of Approaches to Educational Planning (SAEP), the Post-secondary Education Participation Survey (PEPS) and the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS).

    Release date: 2010-09-03

  • Public use microdata: 81M0013X
    Description:

    The Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) is Canada's most comprehensive source of data on individual participation in formal adult education and training. It is the only Canadian survey to collect detailed information about the skill development efforts of the entire adult Canadian population. The AETS provides information about the main subject of training activities, their provider, duration and the sources and types of support for training. Furthermore, the AETS allows for the examination of the socio-economic and demographic profiles of both training participants and non-participants. This survey also identifies barriers faced by individuals who wish to take some form of training but cannot. The AETS was administered three times during the 1990s, in 1992, 1994 and 1998, as a supplement to the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    The content of the AETS was revised to take into account recommendations coming from consultation exercises. As a result, more than half of the 2003 survey is made up of new questions and the target population has been modified.

    The main objectives are:1) To measure the incidence and intensity of adults' participation in job-related formal training.2) To profile employer support to job-related formal training.3) To analyze the aspects of job-related training activities such as: training provider, expenses, financial support, motivations, outcomes and difficulties experienced while training.4) To identify the barriers preventing individuals from participating in the job-related formal training they want or need to take.5) To identify reasons explaining adults' lack of participation and of interest in job-related formal training.6) To relate adults' current participation patterns to their past involvement in and plans about future participation in job-related training.7) To measure the incidence and frequency of adults' participation in job-related informal training.8) To examine the interactions between participation in formal and informal job-related training.

    The population covered by the AETS consists of Canadians 25 years of age and older. This is a change from the population previously targeted by the AETS, which consisted of Canadians aged 17 years of age and older. A primary consideration for this change was the practical difficulties in applying the definition of adult education to individuals in the 17 to 24 years of age group. By definition, adult education excludes students who are still involved in their first or initial stage of schooling. As previous AETS did not precisely identify students still in their initial stage of schooling, analyses using these data had to rely on an ad hoc definition of adult learners. According to this definition, individuals aged 17 to 24 who were not in one of the following situations were excluded from the analysis: full-time students subsidized by an employer and full-time students over 19 enrolled in elementary or secondary programs.

    Release date: 2004-05-27

  • Public use microdata: 81M0009X
    Description:

    The Adult Education Survey (1984) measured the extent to which adult Canadians participated in courses to improve job skills, upgrade academic qualifications, for personal development or for recreation and leisure. The main objectives of the survey were: to measure the incidence of adult education/training in Canada; to provide a socio/economic/demographic profile of individuals who participate and do not participate in education/training.

    Release date: 2000-06-02

  • Table: 75-001-X19970033207
    Description:

    Is there a relationship between participation in adult education and unemployment? This article looks at trends in adult education from 1976 to 1996, and examines who goes back to school, according to age, sex, education already attained and family situation.

    Release date: 1997-09-10
Analysis (44)

Analysis (44) (0 to 10 of 44 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201620114821
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-07-19

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20122776362
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200211652
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study investigates job-related training of Canadian employees age 55 to 64. Using the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS) and several cycles of the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS), it compares the training of older and core-age workers and tracks changes in the incidence and correlates of training over time.

    Release date: 2012-04-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-604-X
    Description:

    Literacy for Life, is the second report from the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey. It presents additional results on the nature and magnitude of the literacy gaps faced by OECD countries and how these gaps have evolved over the medium term.

    It offers new insights into the factors that influence the formation of adult skills in various settings - at home and at work - for the eleven countries participating in the first and last round of data collection between 2003 and 2008. The study offers comparative evidence on the impact of various factors on the supply of skill. The study offers a special focus on numeracy skills and problem solving skills. It explores the relationships between numeracy and key socio-demographic factors as well as labour market outcomes and earnings.

    It highlights the importance of problem solving skills by defining this foundational skill and by exploring its determinants as well as its relative role in influencing important labour market outcomes.

    The report offers also an analysis of performance across multiple skill domains. It investigates the skill profiles of various population groups defined in terms of the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of those who score at levels deemed to be low in one or more skill domains and explores the resulting consequences.

    The report concludes by investigating the issue of skill mismatch in the labour market and its relationship to adult learning. The extent and distribution of mismatch between the day to day literacy related requirements of workers and the literacy skills they have obtained is an important issue that is being explored in this study.

    Release date: 2011-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211493
    Description:

    According to the 2008 Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), nearly 8 million adults between the ages of 25 and 64 took part in formal training activities or education between July 2007 and June 2008, and most of them did so for career- or job-related reasons. This article examines the participation of adult workers in formal, job-related training activities or education. The participation rates of adult workers are analyzed in relation to their demographic characteristics, occupation, employer characteristics, training objectives and learning obstacles.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900611126
    Description:

    Lifelong learning is increasingly recognized as an important element in today's knowledge-based economy defined by rapid advancements in technology and constantly changing skill needs. Lifelong learning is supported by both formal education and training. Information on the participation of Canadian adults in education and training activities is provided by the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) 2003 and the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS) 2008. This article highlights some of the key findings of a recent Statistics Canada report that examined trends in adult education and training, based on data from these two surveys.

    Release date: 2010-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009079
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report is based on the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), which was undertaken by Statistics Canada in partnership with Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The ASETS brings together three previous education surveys that covered specific population groups: 1) the Survey of Approaches to Educational Planning (SAEP), which focused on 0 to 18 year olds; 2) the Post-Secondary Education Participation Survey (PEPS), which focused on 18 to 24 year olds; and 3) the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS), which focused on 25 to 65 year olds. While these three surveys examined specific facets of Canadian's educational experience, their integration in the ASETS allows for a more holistic approach to collecting information on participation in and financing of education and training in Canada. While the ASETS can be used to undertake the same research as the PEPS, AETS and SAEP, it can also be used to address additional research not previously possible.

    The ASETS results presented in this report refer to activities undertaken between July 2007 and June 2008 reference period.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800210644
    Description:

    This article provides information on employer-sponsored training in Canada. It examines the reasons for participating in adult education and training, the labour force status of participants, the impact of job and workplace characteristics on adult learning and the relationship between skills match-mismatch and participation in adult learning. The findings summarized here are based on analysis of data from the 1994 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), undertaken in 1994, and the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), undertaken in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)). The analysis is provided from an international perspective, with the situation in Canada being compared to that of three other countries - Norway, Switzerland and the United States.

    Release date: 2008-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800110560
    Description:

    Research has shown that in a knowledge-based economy and society, economic opportunities and active participation in the broader society are increasingly linked to an individual's ability to command and control his or her own life. It is this context that makes the distribution of adult learning across the population of such importance.

    Canada has had a long interest in better understanding the distribution of adult literacy and learning across population sub-groups. Canada participated in the first round of data collection in the International Adult Literacy Survey (ALL) in 1994. Canada was also a lead country in the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL) in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)).

    The data collected by these surveys provide a wealth of information on the characteristics of adult learners and have generated a number of research studies. This article presents some of the key findings of a recent report that provides detailed information on the characteristics of adult learners in Canada, including the links between participation in adult education and training and literacy skill levels, education, family background and age.

    Release date: 2008-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008055
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Dropout rates, defined as the proportion of 20 to 24 year-olds without a high school diploma and not attending school, have been trending downward. Data from the Labour Force Survey shows that the rate for men fell from 21% in 1990/1991 to 14% in 2004/2005; for women, the rates were 16% in 1990/1991 and 9% in 2004/2005. Many dropouts later return to school, taking advantage of the 'second-chance' educational opportunities offered by provinces and institutions across Canada.

    This report uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey to analyze the determinants of the return-to-school. The analysis finds that dropout rates are lower among young women than among young men and that, if they do dropout before completing high school, young women are also more likely to return to school than young men.

    Young male and female dropouts are influenced by different factors in their decision to return to school. For young male dropouts, two of the strongest predictors of the decision to return to school are their parents' education and having taken, in high school, a mathematics course designed to prepare them for postsecondary studies. Young men who dropped out in their last year of high school were more likely to return to school than their counterparts who had dropped out earlier. For young women, time elapsed since leaving school is the most influential factor. However, young women who left school due to personal reasons (most often, pregnancy) are 30% more likely to return than other female dropouts.

    Release date: 2008-04-09
Reference (9)

Reference (9) ((9 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-595-M2009071
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This document outlines the definitions and the typology now used by Statistics Canada's Centre for Education Statistics to identify, classify and delineate the universities, colleges and other providers of postsecondary and adult education in Canada for which basic enrolments, graduates, professors and finance statistics are produced.

    These new rigorous definitions were needed to capture the growing complexity of postsecondary education in Canada. They differentiate the various types of postsecondary institutions, address the blurring distinction between colleges and universities and handle the various forms of possible relationships between institutions.

    The document brings closure to the extensive consultation that took place between January 2003 and the spring of 2007 as it summarizes the changes made following the 2004 paper entitled "A New Understanding of Post-secondary Education in Canada: A Discussion Paper".

    Such an extensive consultation was deemed necessary to ensure that the typology is useful to the whole sector and that it allows comparisons between provinces and territories despite the significant differences of their respective postsecondary education systems.

    Release date: 2009-01-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-595-M2003009
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines how the Canadian Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) can be used to study participation in and impacts of education and training activities for adults.

    Release date: 2003-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-580-X
    Description:

    The adult education and training sector is as complex as it is dynamic. In order to describe all its facets, Statistics Canada surveys many different populations. Given the number of data sources and their conceptual and methodological differences, it is sometimes very difficult for researchers and decision makers to obtain required information or data. This guide is a tool that has been developed to assist them. It provides a summary description of all Statistics Canada surveys related to adult education and training. From a selected variable, it allows the identification of surveys that can provide information. It also indicates relevant publications and how to obtain additional information.

    Release date: 1997-03-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-001-X199400137
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    An overview is presented of several surveys on training and education developed by Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1994-03-02

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3147
    Description: This discontinued survey collected data related to enrolment or registrations in continuing education programs or courses in Canadian Universities. The data were used by federal government departments of higher education as well as related association and individual researchers. The information was used for the analysis of the labour force supply, studies of the education system and the participation of special groups such as foreign students, language groups and women.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3879
    Description: The Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) is Canada's most comprehensive source of data on individual participation in formal adult education and training. It is the only Canadian survey to collect detailed information about the skill development efforts of the entire adult Canadian population.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4406
    Description: The Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) is a multi-cycle international program of assessment of adult skills and competencies initiated by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). It aims to collect the information of residents from several countries, including Canada.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5075
    Description: This tool is designed to identify the universe of public and not-for-profit postsecondary and adult education institutions in Canada and their programs of study.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5151
    Description: The Access and Support to Education and Training Survey addresses issues relating to antecedents and determinants to access to Post Secondary Education (PSE), including the role of student financing and participation in adult education and training.
Date modified: