Economic accounts

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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-602-X
    Description:

    With the 2015 comprehensive revision, the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts (CSMA) has introduced a major presentational change to the national and the provincial and territorial input-output tables. The previous CSMA input-output presentation differed from the international standard and the practice found in most national statistical organizations. The CSMA has aligned its presentation with the international standard and replaces the presentation found in catalogues 15F0041X and 15F0042X, as well as 15F0002X.

    Release date: 2019-11-07

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X2019311840
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-11-07

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2019022
    Description:

    This interactive tool allows for custom manipulation and visualization of data sourced from the Provincial and Territorial Economic Accounts. The overview covers three broad areas: gross domestic product (GDP) by income, by expenditure and by industry. By clicking within the tool you will be able to filter, highlight and select various provincial and territorial economic aggregations.

    Release date: 2019-11-07

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2019024
    Description:

    With this interactive tool, users can see the changes in Gross domestic product (GDP) at basic prices over time, at the provincial and territorial levels, using a detailed approach by industry as defined by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Canada 2017 version 3.0. GDP by industry at basic prices is a measure of the economic production of Canada’s provinces and territories. The values in the visualization tool are presented as percent change in chained (2012) dollars and by contributions to the percentage change, by selected industries. For more information on this program, please see Gross Domestic Product by Industry - Provincial and Territorial (Annual) . As a supplement to the GDP by industry data, please also consult the following visualization product: Provincial and territorial economic accounts: Interactive tool.

    Release date: 2019-11-07

  • Table: 12-10-0088-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 386-0003)
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    The interprovincial and international trade flows shows the origin and destination of trade flows by product among Canadian provinces and territories and from and to the rest of the world. The information is available at the Summary level of hierarchy of the Supply and Use Product Classification (SUPC).

    Release date: 2019-11-07

  • Table: 34-10-0095-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 026-0009)
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory, Economic region
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Owner occupied and landlord and tenant occupied expenditures for Canada, the provinces and territories, annual.

    Release date: 2019-11-07

  • Table: 36-10-0221-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 384-0037)
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Income-based gross domestic product, by province and territory.
    Release date: 2019-11-07

  • Table: 36-10-0222-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 384-0038)
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Annual expenditure-based, gross domestic product, by province and territory in chained, current and constant 2012 dollars.
    Release date: 2019-11-07

  • Table: 36-10-0223-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 384-0039)
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Annual implicit price indexes and contributions to percent change in implicit price indexes for expenditure-based gross domestic product, by province and territory, 2012 = 100.

    Release date: 2019-11-07

  • Table: 36-10-0224-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 384-0040)
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Annual current account statistics for the household sector, including saving rate and disposable income, by province and territory.
    Release date: 2019-11-07
Data (809)

Data (809) (0 to 10 of 809 results)

Analysis (519)

Analysis (519) (510 to 520 of 519 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011780
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    When productivity increases in a sector, does it mean employment growth? This article explores the question and introduces a new concept: multifactor productivity.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

  • Stats in brief: 13-604-M1994031
    Description:

    There has been growing interest in recent years about the scope of tourism in Canada. In response to this demand for information, Statistics Canada has developed a Tourism Satellite Account (TSA) which provides some answers to questions such as: Which industries constitute 'the tourism industry'? What are the industry's gross domestic product (GDP) and employment rates? And what is the extent of tourism-related expenditures?

    This article reports on the research that Statistics Canada has undertaken as part of an ongoing examination of the tourism industry.

    Release date: 1994-08-31

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M1994028
    Description:

    This (1994) paper considers four alternative definitions of the underground economy and examines the available evidence about its size. Statistics Canada believes the underground economy is far smaller than the money demand studies have suggested.

    Release date: 1994-05-30

  • Stats in brief: 13-604-M1994029
    Description:

    Revised estimates of the Income and Expenditure Accounts (IEA) covering 1990 to 1993 have been released along with the estimates for the first quarter of 1994. These revised estimates reflect the most current source data and seasonal patterns. The annual revision of the different parts of the System of National Accounts is an integrated process. Revised estimates of two other parts of the system, the Balance of International Payments and Financial Flow Accounts, have been released simultaneously. Corresponding revisions to the monthly estimates of the gross domestic product (GDP), by industry and to the Input-Output Accounts at current and constant prices will be available at the end of August.

    The first section of this paper reviews the current revisions to the GDP and the main aggregates. The second section analyses the revision patterns of selected income and expenditure aggregates of the GDP over the period 1980 to 1993. For further information on sources, methods and definitions employed in the IE A, refer to the Guide to the Income and Expenditure Accounts, Catalogue no. 13-603E, no. 1.

    Release date: 1994-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M1994027
    Description:

    This article presents the first results from a study of the value of household work (VHW) in Canada for 1992. The study, the fourth of its kind, is part of continuing efforts to extend measures of production both within and outside Statistics Canada's System of National Accounts. A more in-depth report on the study is currently being prepared.

    Release date: 1994-02-28

  • Stats in brief: 13-604-M1993024
    Description:

    Revised estimates of the Income and Expenditure Accounts covering 1989 to 1992 have been released along with the estimates for the first quarter of 1993. These revised estimates reflect the most current source data and seasonal patterns. The annual revision of the different parts of the System of the National Accounts is an integrated process. As such, revised estimates of two other parts of the system -- the Balance of International Payments and Financial Flow Accounts -- have been released simultaneously. Corresponding revisions to the monthly estimates of Gross Domestic Product by Industry and to the Input-Output Accounts at current and constant prices are also available.

    Release date: 1993-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M1993025
    Description:

    This article introduces two new tables showing volume indexes of real gross domestic product (GDP) per capita and its components for Canada compared with the United States and the associated purchasing power parities (PPPs). These international comparisons of real expenditures based on PPPs are considered to be a major addition to the tools available for macroeconomic analysis. For example, the recent publication by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) of a set of estimates of different countries' output using PPPs has changed the view of the share of world output that comes from the industrialized countries compared with the developing economies.

    An analysis based on PPPs, rather than a more conventional one based on exchange rates, has significantly changed the relative measures of output of countries. Comparisons based on exchange rates are unlikely to fully take into account the differences in price levels between countries (i.e., the goods and services that can be purchased in one country's currency compared with another's). Moreover, services are not generally traded in the way that goods are, so their prices in different countries tend not to be related in a way that parallels the currency exchange rate. If aggregate output is to be properly compared across countries, PPPs become more and more important as the size of the service sector grows.

    Economic theory would suggest that for internationally traded domestically produced goods and services, PPPs and exchange rates will tend to equalize in the long run. Exchange rates, however, can fluctuate widely in short periods and are affected by expectations and factors such as deficits, wars, fuel shortages and interest rates. With the calculation of PPPs, actual price level differences can be identified. Such measures are also much more stable over time.

    Release date: 1993-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199300234
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The interview discusses Canada's transition from an industrial to an information economy.

    Release date: 1993-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19910032426
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Has recovery begun? An up-to-date look at labour market developments in the first six months of 1991.

    Release date: 1991-09-05
Reference (180)

Reference (180) (50 to 60 of 180 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-599-X
    Description:

    This guide presents an overview of the scope and structure of the Pension Satellite Account as well as the methodology used to derive its stocks and flows estimates.

    Release date: 2010-11-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2010027
    Description:

    Measures of productivity are derived by comparing outputs and inputs. The System of National Accounts (SNA) in Canada provides a useful framework for organizing the information required for comparisons of this type. Integrated systems of economic accounts provide coherent, consistent alternate estimates of the various concepts that can be used to measure productivity.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X201000111130
    Description:

    The majority of Canada's national, provincial and territorial macroeconomic indicators originate from the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA). These indicators include such things as gross domestic product, net worth, savings, personal disposable income and government debt. Statistics Canada is launching a project that will make key changes to these macroeconomic indicators. The changes introduced by this project are outlined in this paper.

    Release date: 2010-05-05

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X201000111155
    Description:

    The government finance statistical program is designed to measure and analyze the economic dimensions of the public sector of Canada

    Statistics Canada, in cooperation with representatives of all levels of government and with the academic and business communities, developed the Financial Management System (FMS) over the last 65 years. The FMS was founded on a modified-cash based system of accounting. Recently, Canadian governments have decided to move from that modified-cash based accounting system to an accrual based accounting system. In addition, an internationally accepted Government Finance Statistics (GFS) manual has been developed. This article outlines the move to Government Finance Statistics.

    Release date: 2010-05-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-605-X200900211057
    Description:

    With the latest release of the bilateral Purchasing Power Parities estimates for Canada and the U.S., an improved projection methodology for the non-benchmark year has been employed. This note summarizes the new methodology and its rationale.

    Release date: 2009-12-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-604-M2009062
    Description:

    Statistics Canada produces monthly import and export merchandise trade price indexes. For the majority of these prices, Statistics Canada uses a variety of proxy measures to derive the price index in lieu of collecting observed import and export prices. The ability of these proxy measures to reflect international trade price movements during times of exchange rate volatility is limited. For this reason, the constant dollar trade estimates derived using these proxy price indexes have been refined with constant dollar adjustments following the appreciation of the Canadian exchange rate beginning at the end of 2002. This paper explains the rational and methodology behind these adjustments, as well as the impact on published trade and GDP estimates.

    Release date: 2009-12-04

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X200900111027
    Description:

    With the release of the Financial Flow Accounts (FFA) on December 1st and the National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA) on December 14th, the Income and Expenditure Accounts Division will be publishing revised sector and category detail on CANSIM.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 68F0023X
    Description:

    Government financial reports are based on the organisation of each individual government and on their accounting and reporting practices. There is therefore little uniformity from one level of government to another or from one province to another. The Financial Management System (FMS) is an analytical framework designed to produce statistical series that are both consistent and compatible.

    Written in plain English, the Financial Management System (FMS) manual was designed to assist you in better understanding the framework of the Financial Management System (FMS). It will explain the strengths and caveats of the FMS and will provide you with clear explanations of what is included in each revenue source and each expenditure function.

    Release date: 2009-07-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-589-X
    Description:

    This free publication presents the concepts and criteria utilized to determine the entities that comprise the public sector of Canada.

    The resulting statistical universe provides the framework to observe the extent of governments' involvement in the production of goods and services and the associated resource allocation process in the Canadian economy.

    The concepts and criteria contained in the guide are consistent with two internationally accepted classification standards: the System of National Accounts (SNA 2008) guide; and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Government Finance Statistics Manual 2001.

    As well, the guide delineates the various public sector components that are used in compiling and aggregating public sector data. This structure also enables comparisons of Canadian government finance data with international macroeconomic statistical systems.

    Release date: 2008-09-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-206-X2008018
    Description:

    Official data from statistical agencies are not always ideal for cross-country comparisons because of differences in data sources and methodology. Analysts who engage in cross-country comparisons need to carefully choose among alternatives and sometimes adapt data especially for their purposes. This paper develops comparable capital stock estimates to examine the relative capital intensity of Canada and the United States.

    To do so, the paper applies common depreciation rates to Canadian and U.S. assets to come up with comparable capital stock estimates by assets and by industry between the two countries. Based on common depreciation rates, it finds that capital intensity is higher in the Canadian business sector than in the U.S. business sector. This is the net result of quite different ratios at the individual asset level. Canada has as higher intensity of engineering infrastructure assets per dollar of gross domestic product produced. Canada has a lower intensity of information and communications technology (ICT) machinery and equipment (M&E). Non-ICT M&E and building assets intensities are more alike in the two countries.

    However, these results do not control for the fact that different asset-specific capital intensities between Canada and the United States may be the result of a different industrial structure. When both assets and industry structure are taken into account, the overall picture changes somewhat. Canada's business sector continues to have a higher intensity of engineering infrastructure and about the same intensity of building assets; however, it has a deficit in M&E that goes beyond ICT assets.

    Release date: 2008-07-10

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