Productivity accounts

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All (93)

All (93) (0 to 10 of 93 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019008
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines how accounting for greenhouse gas emissions as part of economic activity changes the measurement of productivity growth.

    Release date: 2019-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019013
    Description:

    The need to measure both the desirable outputs (goods and services) and the undesirable outputs (emissions of greenhouse gases [GHGs] and criteria air contaminants [CACs]) from economic activity is becoming increasingly important as economic performance and environmental performance become ever more intertwined. Standard measures of multifactor productivity (MFP) growth provide insights into rising standards of living and the performance of economies, but they may be misleading if only desirable outputs are considered. This study presents estimates of environmentally adjusted multifactor productivity (EAMFP) growth using a new comprehensive database. This database contains information on GHG and CAC emissions, as well as on the production activities of Canadian manufacturers.

    Release date: 2019-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2018084
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article examines the changes in productivity dispersion in Canadian manufacturing—that is, the difference between the productivity performance of the most productive plants (frontier plants) and the productivity performance of all remaining plants (non frontier plants). It examines the relationship between changes in productivity dispersion, aggregate manufacturing productivity growth and exchange rate movements.

    Release date: 2018-11-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018409
    Description:

    Labour productivity growth and multifactor productivity (MFP) growth slowed in Canada and other advanced economies after 2000. Several measurement challenges have been suggested as potential explanations for this trend. These include the measurement of intangible capital in a digital economy, the measurement of natural resource capital in the resource extraction sectors, the effect of infrastructure capital and the effect of cyclical fluctuations in the utilization of capital in industries adversely affected by world demand. This paper focuses on the role of these measurement issues in the slower productivity growth observed in Canada.

    Release date: 2018-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2018089
    Description:

    The industrial capacity utilization rate (ICUR) is the ratio of an industry’s actual output to its estimated potential output—it represents the intensity with which industries use their production capacity. The rate provides insight into the overall slack in the economy or in a firm at a given point in time.

    Release date: 2018-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016373
    Description:

    This paper examines how much of the slowdown in productivity growth observed in Canada’s business sector between the 1990s (1990 to 1999) and the 2000s (2000 to 2014) was due to weaker productivity growth within industries and how much was due to structural adjustment. The analysis makes use of a decomposition method that differs from many of the standard labour productivity decomposition approaches commonly found in the literature and allows the contributions of changes in the importance of individual industries to be calculated.

    Release date: 2016-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016057
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article addresses the extent to which immigrants contribute to economic growth. For the first time, the business ownership and job-creation activities of immigrants are addressed. A longer, more detailed study is also available.

    Release date: 2016-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2015098
    Description:

    Two sources of industry productivity growth are firm productivity improvements and the reallocation of productive resources from less productive to more productive firms. This paper studies the role of offshoring in improving industry productivity through these two channels, using a new Canadian manufacturing data base that links the Annual Survey of Manufactures and the Importer Register database at the commodity level. The database provides information on direct imports of intermediate inputs by firms. This allows us to estimate offshoring intensity in Canada at the firm level, and to differentiate those imports by region of origin.

    Release date: 2015-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2015097
    Description:

    Canada’s aggregate productivity performance has closely tracked changes in Canada’s trading environment. To gain a better understanding of the link, the Economic Analysis Division of Statistics Canada has conducted a set of studies that investigate whether and how changes in the trading environment, brought about by trade liberalization policies and exchange-rate movements, contributed to productivity growth. The firm-level analysis provides insights into the productivity dynamics that arise from within-industry growth and restructuring as resources are shifted from declining to growing industries. The paper provides an overview of the key Canadian empirical findings over the last two decades.

    Release date: 2015-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2015039
    Description:

    This paper generates updated estimates of depreciation rates to be used in the Canadian Productivity Accounts for the calculation of capital stock and the user cost of capital. Estimates are derived of depreciation profiles for a diverse set of assets, based on patterns of resale prices and retirement ages.

    A maximum likelihood technique is used to jointly estimate changes in the valuation of assets over the course of their service life, as well as the nature of the discard process used to dispose of assets to generate depreciation rates. This method is more efficient than others in producing estimates with less bias and higher efficiency.

    The earlier estimates that were derived for the period from 1985 to 2001 are compared with those for the latest period, from 2002 to 2010.

    Release date: 2015-01-26
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Analysis (93)

Analysis (93) (0 to 10 of 93 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019008
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines how accounting for greenhouse gas emissions as part of economic activity changes the measurement of productivity growth.

    Release date: 2019-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019013
    Description:

    The need to measure both the desirable outputs (goods and services) and the undesirable outputs (emissions of greenhouse gases [GHGs] and criteria air contaminants [CACs]) from economic activity is becoming increasingly important as economic performance and environmental performance become ever more intertwined. Standard measures of multifactor productivity (MFP) growth provide insights into rising standards of living and the performance of economies, but they may be misleading if only desirable outputs are considered. This study presents estimates of environmentally adjusted multifactor productivity (EAMFP) growth using a new comprehensive database. This database contains information on GHG and CAC emissions, as well as on the production activities of Canadian manufacturers.

    Release date: 2019-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2018084
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article examines the changes in productivity dispersion in Canadian manufacturing—that is, the difference between the productivity performance of the most productive plants (frontier plants) and the productivity performance of all remaining plants (non frontier plants). It examines the relationship between changes in productivity dispersion, aggregate manufacturing productivity growth and exchange rate movements.

    Release date: 2018-11-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018409
    Description:

    Labour productivity growth and multifactor productivity (MFP) growth slowed in Canada and other advanced economies after 2000. Several measurement challenges have been suggested as potential explanations for this trend. These include the measurement of intangible capital in a digital economy, the measurement of natural resource capital in the resource extraction sectors, the effect of infrastructure capital and the effect of cyclical fluctuations in the utilization of capital in industries adversely affected by world demand. This paper focuses on the role of these measurement issues in the slower productivity growth observed in Canada.

    Release date: 2018-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2018089
    Description:

    The industrial capacity utilization rate (ICUR) is the ratio of an industry’s actual output to its estimated potential output—it represents the intensity with which industries use their production capacity. The rate provides insight into the overall slack in the economy or in a firm at a given point in time.

    Release date: 2018-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016373
    Description:

    This paper examines how much of the slowdown in productivity growth observed in Canada’s business sector between the 1990s (1990 to 1999) and the 2000s (2000 to 2014) was due to weaker productivity growth within industries and how much was due to structural adjustment. The analysis makes use of a decomposition method that differs from many of the standard labour productivity decomposition approaches commonly found in the literature and allows the contributions of changes in the importance of individual industries to be calculated.

    Release date: 2016-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016057
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article addresses the extent to which immigrants contribute to economic growth. For the first time, the business ownership and job-creation activities of immigrants are addressed. A longer, more detailed study is also available.

    Release date: 2016-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2015098
    Description:

    Two sources of industry productivity growth are firm productivity improvements and the reallocation of productive resources from less productive to more productive firms. This paper studies the role of offshoring in improving industry productivity through these two channels, using a new Canadian manufacturing data base that links the Annual Survey of Manufactures and the Importer Register database at the commodity level. The database provides information on direct imports of intermediate inputs by firms. This allows us to estimate offshoring intensity in Canada at the firm level, and to differentiate those imports by region of origin.

    Release date: 2015-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2015097
    Description:

    Canada’s aggregate productivity performance has closely tracked changes in Canada’s trading environment. To gain a better understanding of the link, the Economic Analysis Division of Statistics Canada has conducted a set of studies that investigate whether and how changes in the trading environment, brought about by trade liberalization policies and exchange-rate movements, contributed to productivity growth. The firm-level analysis provides insights into the productivity dynamics that arise from within-industry growth and restructuring as resources are shifted from declining to growing industries. The paper provides an overview of the key Canadian empirical findings over the last two decades.

    Release date: 2015-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2015039
    Description:

    This paper generates updated estimates of depreciation rates to be used in the Canadian Productivity Accounts for the calculation of capital stock and the user cost of capital. Estimates are derived of depreciation profiles for a diverse set of assets, based on patterns of resale prices and retirement ages.

    A maximum likelihood technique is used to jointly estimate changes in the valuation of assets over the course of their service life, as well as the nature of the discard process used to dispose of assets to generate depreciation rates. This method is more efficient than others in producing estimates with less bias and higher efficiency.

    The earlier estimates that were derived for the period from 1985 to 2001 are compared with those for the latest period, from 2002 to 2010.

    Release date: 2015-01-26
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