National accounts and Gross Domestic Product

Key indicators

Selected geographical area: Canada

More national accounts and gross domestic product indicators

Selected geographical area: Canada

Selected geographical area: Newfoundland and Labrador

Selected geographical area: Prince Edward Island

Selected geographical area: Nova Scotia

Selected geographical area: New Brunswick

Selected geographical area: Quebec

Selected geographical area: Ontario

Selected geographical area: Manitoba

Selected geographical area: Saskatchewan

Selected geographical area: Alberta

Selected geographical area: British Columbia

Selected geographical area: Yukon

Selected geographical area: Northwest Territories

Selected geographical area: Nunavut

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Survey or statistical program

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help

Results

All (3)

All (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 15-203-X
    Description:

    This publication presents current and constant price estimates of provincial gross domestic product (GDP) for over 50 industries covering the entire Canadian economy, including aggregates and special industry groupings. The document also includes a comprehensive analytical review of the economy of each province and territory with summary text, tables and charts.

    Release date: 2000-10-30

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X20000018519
    Description:

    With the release of the first quarter 2000 of the National Income and Expenditure Accounts the sectoring of federal and provincial government, non-autonomous pension plans has changed. These pension plans are now part of the personal sector. Previously these plans were included in either the federal or provincial government sector accounts.

    Release date: 2000-05-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0031M2000002
    Description:

    This paper deals with a problem in internationally comparable economic statistics, namely, the fact that countries measure value added by industry differently. The economic measure, value added, is important both in its own right and because it is a component of other economic measures such as productivity. Value added by industry measures the additional value created by a production process. This additional value, created by factors of production such as labour and capital, may be calculated either before or after deducting the consumption of fixed capital used in production. Thus, gross value added by industry is the value of its output of goods and services less the value of its intermediate consumption of goods and services and net value added as the value of output less the values of both intermediate consumption and consumption of fixed capital.

    Release date: 2000-04-04
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 15-203-X
    Description:

    This publication presents current and constant price estimates of provincial gross domestic product (GDP) for over 50 industries covering the entire Canadian economy, including aggregates and special industry groupings. The document also includes a comprehensive analytical review of the economy of each province and territory with summary text, tables and charts.

    Release date: 2000-10-30
Analysis (0)

Analysis (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X20000018519
    Description:

    With the release of the first quarter 2000 of the National Income and Expenditure Accounts the sectoring of federal and provincial government, non-autonomous pension plans has changed. These pension plans are now part of the personal sector. Previously these plans were included in either the federal or provincial government sector accounts.

    Release date: 2000-05-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0031M2000002
    Description:

    This paper deals with a problem in internationally comparable economic statistics, namely, the fact that countries measure value added by industry differently. The economic measure, value added, is important both in its own right and because it is a component of other economic measures such as productivity. Value added by industry measures the additional value created by a production process. This additional value, created by factors of production such as labour and capital, may be calculated either before or after deducting the consumption of fixed capital used in production. Thus, gross value added by industry is the value of its output of goods and services less the value of its intermediate consumption of goods and services and net value added as the value of output less the values of both intermediate consumption and consumption of fixed capital.

    Release date: 2000-04-04
Date modified: