Victimization

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  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201700114698
    Description:

    This Juristat article profiles a general overview of family violence in Canada, intimate partner violence (including both spousal and dating violence partners), family violence against children and youth, and family violence against seniors. This annual article is designed to help monitor changes in family violence over time and identify emerging issues.

    Release date: 2017-02-16

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201635415702
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-12-19

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201632015427
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114678
    Description:

    This study provides information on the number of Canadians who reported that they ever had to temporarily live with family, friends, in their car, or anywhere else because they had nowhere else to live—a situation referred to as ‘hidden’ or ‘concealed’ homelessness. It also examines the characteristics of those who had experienced hidden homelessness at some point in their life.

    Release date: 2016-11-15

  • Public use microdata: 12M0026X
    Description:

    This package was designed to help users access and manipulate the public use microdata file (PUMF – provincial) for the 2014 General Social Survey (GSS) on Canadians’ Safety (Victimization). It contains the PUMF data and describes the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures for this survey as well as guidelines for releasing estimates.

    Statistics Canada collected data on the topic of Canadians’ safety (Victimization) for the sixth time in 2014. Data were previously collected in 1988 (Cycle 3), 1993 (Cycle 8), 1999 (Cycle 13), 2004 (Cycle 18) and 2009 (Cycle 23). The 2014 provincial GSS collected data from persons aged 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut and full time residents of institutions.

    Between 2009 and 2014, the core content of the survey was revised in a number of ways, based on experience gained from earlier iterations. Some questions were revised to improve their clarity for respondents, and others were added or dropped following consultations with stakeholders from the justice sector, government and academic communities.

    Release date: 2016-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114631
    Description:

    This Juristat article uses data from the 2014 General Social Survey on Victimization to present information on Aboriginal victimization, with a particular focus on violent victimization. Characteristics associated with these incidents, including possible risk factors, as well as consequences of victimization, reasons for reporting or not reporting the victimization to the police, perceptions of personal safety, and perceptions of the criminal justice system are also explored.

    Release date: 2016-06-28

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20161184974
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114470
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This Juristat presents the first results from the 2014 General Social Survey on Victimization in the territories. The analysis provides insight on the nature and extent of criminal victimization in the territories. The report also examines the factors associated with the risk of being the victim of a crime, the characteristics of spousal violence, the consequences of victimization, the reporting of incidents to police, feelings of safety and perceptions of the police.

    Release date: 2016-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600314339
    Description:

    With data from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey—Mental Health, physical abuse, sexual abuse, and exposure to intimate partner violence during childhood were examined in relation to self-perceived general health and 13 self-reported, physician-diagnosed chronic conditions among people aged 18 or older.

    Release date: 2016-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114303
    Description:

    This Juristat article profiles a general overview of family violence in Canada, intimate partner violence (including both spousal and dating violence partners), family violence against children, and family violence against seniors. This annual article is designed to help monitor changes in family violence over time and identify emerging issues.

    Release date: 2016-01-21
Data (48)

Data (48) (0 to 10 of 48 results)

Analysis (191)

Analysis (191) (180 to 190 of 191 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X19990005315
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Changes in legislation, policies and programs on the part of both federal and provincial/territorial governments have occurred as part of a response to the problem of family violence. This section highlights a few of the responses by provincial courts, the federal correctional system, the network of transition homes and shelters across the country, as well as recent changes in provincial/territorial legislation.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • 182. Sex offenders Archived
    Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990038298
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the past twenty years, there has been growing public awareness and concern about the occurrence of sexual offending and the personal and societal costs associated with these acts. There has been a gradual reduction in the stigma associated with being a victim of these crimes and, as supports for victims have developed, there has been an apparent increased willingness of victims to report these crimes to police, often long after the abuse has occurred. In many cases, the perpetrators of these crimes are in trusted positions of authority and the victims are dependent children. This Juristat presents statistical data on the prevalence of sexual offences reported to the police and the characteristics of the offenders and victims involved. It also highlights some of the salient issues associated with the response of the justice system and the public to offenders and their victims. Data sources include statistics collected by the police, courts and correctional institutions. These official sources probably represent only a small portion of all sexual offences and offenders, since results from victimization surveys suggest that as many as 90% of all sexual offences are not reported to the police. Data concerning victims of sexual offences, including information available from victimization surveys, are presented in the final section of this report.

    Release date: 1999-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19980098291
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Police-reported statistics indicate that crime rates in Canada decreased for the fifth consecutive year in 1996. Similar trends have been noted in England/Wales and the United States. Results from victimization surveys confirm this recent trend, yet despite this decrease in crime, many Canadians remain fearful of being victimized. What is the source of this fear; who is more likely to be a victim of violent crime; who is the typical perpetrator; and where is the victimization likely to take place? Generally speaking, questions like these are designed to assess concerns about threats of violence by strangers. But what is the nature of violent incidents involving strangers and what are the characteristics of those strangers? The answers to these questions are examined below.The purpose of this Juristat is to examine the profile of perpetrators and victims of violent crime by comparing characteristics of crimes committed by strangers to those involving offenders known to the victim. This will contribute to discussions about the nature of violent crime and about related concerns that are at the centre of current debates.

    Release date: 1998-06-19

  • Stats in brief: 85-224-X19980005281
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1996, 21, 901 cases of spousal assault were recorded in a sample of 154 police departments across the country. The proportion of male victims of spousal assault was relatively small (11%) compared to female victims (89%).

    Release date: 1998-05-28

  • 185. Spousal violence Archived
    Articles and reports: 85-224-X19980005284
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This section examines the nature and extent of cases of spousal violence reported to the police. Special attention is given to how spousal violence differs for women and men.

    Release date: 1998-05-28

  • 186. Child abuse Archived
    Articles and reports: 85-224-X19980005286
    Description:

    Child abuse and neglect often result in physical, emotional and developmental problems which can affect victims throughout their lifetime.However counting cases of child abuse is fraught with many difficulties.

    Release date: 1998-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19980068261
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on the major areas of the criminal justice system (police, courts, legal aid, prosecutions and correctional services), as well as on a variety of current topics and issues related to justice in Canada.

    Release date: 1998-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19970118230
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The abuse of children and youth in the family is a serious concern for Canadians. Child abuse and neglect often result in physical, emotional and developmental problems which can affect the victims throughout their lives. There are currently no national estimates of child abuse in Canada. Only those incidents that come to the attention of officials, such as the police and child welfare agencies, are known. Efforts to understand the nature and the scope of child abuse should therefore take into account the fact that available data reflect only a portion of the total. This Juristat uses statistical databases of police reported incidents across Canada to describe what is currently known from a criminal justice perspective about violence against children and youth in the family. Although these police reported incidents account for only a portion of all abuse that occurs, they nonetheless provide an important tool for profiling the more serious cases. For the purposes of this analysis, "children" include all young persons under 18 years of age, and "family members" include persons related to the victim by kniship, either through blood, marriage, common-law or adoption, as well as legal guardians such as foster parents.

    Release date: 1997-11-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-542-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The purpose of this report is to reduce the level of confusion arising from the use of crime data originating from two very different sources (i.e., the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey - UCR and the General Social Survey - GSS) and to inform discussions about which is the better measure of crime. It explains why the findings based on these data sources diverge and summarizes the major differences between the two surveys.

    Release date: 1997-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19960128165
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The intent of this Juristat is to present police and court data on criminal harassment that are currently available from Statistics Canada's Revised Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey and Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS). As the legislation is relatively new, this report is a first attempt at producing a detailed analysis of criminal harassment data. The statistics in this report provide only a partial picture of criminal harassment in Canada and are not nationally representative. As such, the analysis will focus on the nature of incidents rather than the extent. Please refer to the Methodology section for more details on the data sources.

    Release date: 1996-12-17
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