Victimization

Key indicators

Changing any selection will automatically update the page content.

Selected geographical area: Canada

Selected geographical area: Newfoundland and Labrador

Selected geographical area: Prince Edward Island

Selected geographical area: Nova Scotia

Selected geographical area: New Brunswick

Selected geographical area: Quebec

Selected geographical area: Ontario

Selected geographical area: Manitoba

Selected geographical area: Saskatchewan

Selected geographical area: Alberta

Selected geographical area: British Columbia

Selected geographical area: Yukon

Selected geographical area: Northwest Territories

Selected geographical area: Nunavut

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (133)

All (133) (0 to 10 of 133 results)

Data (22)

Data (22) (10 to 20 of 22 results)

Analysis (111)

Analysis (111) (60 to 70 of 111 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20020006457
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the past two decades, the negative consequences of child maltreatment have been extensively studied. Sexual and physical assault, emotional abuse and neglect can have a tremendous impact on the lives of victims and lead to physical health complications, long-term mental health issues, and problems with relationships or social functioning (Latimer 1998). Increasingly, exposure to spousal violence is being recognized as harmful and as putting children at risk for long-term negative effects.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • 62. Home Invasions Archived
    Stats in brief: 85F0027X2002002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin examines 'home invasions'. Recent high-profile incidents of 'home invasion' have received significant exposure in the media, particularly those where the elderly have been targeted. The impact of 'home invasions' extends beyond the violence of the crime itself to a long-term loss of the victim's sense of safety at home.

    Release date: 2002-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020048414
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2000 International Crime Victimization Survey (ICVS) provides comparable international information on the nature and extent of crime. Respondents supply detailed information on 11 types of crime, including when, where and how often offences occurred over the previous five years; whether offences were reported to the police; and whether victimization experiences were considered serious. Participants give their opinions on public safety, policing and sentencing.

    This Juristat presents an overview of the findings of the 2000 ICVS and makes comparisons with previous survey cycles from 1989, 1992 and 1996. The majority of the analysis focuses on data from the following 13 of 17 participants: Canada, Australia, Belgium, England and Wales, Finland, France, Japan, the Netherlands, Northern Ireland, Poland, Scotland, Sweden and the United States. Canada was one of the 17 industrialized countries that participated in 2000 and is one of five industrialized countries to have participated in all four cycles of the survey.

    Release date: 2002-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015808
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the results of the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, this chapter examines the characteristics of those who are at greatest risk of violent victimization and the environment in which these incidents occur.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015809
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The primary purpose of this chapter is to examine the factors associated with the risk of household victimization. First though, trends in household crime as well as the impact of household crime will be discussed.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015810
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This chapter will assess variations in crime between urban and rural areas as reported by respondents to the 1999 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015811
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the results of the 1999 GSS on Victimization, this chapter will look at the issue of reporting to police in more detail.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015812
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using results from the 1999 GSS, this chapter will examine Canadians' perceptions and fear of crime. In particular, attention is focused on four main area: pervasiveness of fear of crime, factors that can affect fear of crime, and the use of precautionary measures.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-553-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides an in-depth analysis of the findings of the 1999 General Social Survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. The chapters examine the risks of violent and household victimization; urban and rural victimization; victims' use of services; and perceptions and fear of crime.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010068392
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Juristat presents estimates of the number of children in Canada who have witnessed violence in their homes in recent years, and compares the characteristics of these children and their families to children who have not witnessed violence. This analysis also examines links between witnessing violence and behavioural outcomes among children.Estimates of the extent of family violence witnessed by children in Canada are available through three national surveys conducted by Statistics Canada: the 1999 General Social Survey on Victimization, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. The GSS and the VAWS are victimization surveys that ask a random sample of adults (men and women in the case of the GSS and women only in the case of the VAWS) about their experiences of spousal violence and whether their children witnessed the violence. In the NLSCY, a random sample of children are selected and the person most knowledgeable about the child responds to a wide range of questions about the child and the household, including whether the child sees adults or teenagers in the home physically fighting, hitting or otherwise trying to hurt others.

    Release date: 2001-06-28
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: