Victimization

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (6)

All (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the major trends in the series on the spatial analysis of crime conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) using geographic information system technology in Canadian cities. The main purpose of this analytical series was to explore the relationships between the distribution of crime and the demographic, socio economic and functional characteristics of neighbourhoods. Questions addressed include: How are police reported criminal incidents distributed across city neighbourhoods? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood associated with factors that are specific to that neighbourhood, such as its demographic, socio-economic, housing and land use characteristics? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood influenced by nearby neighbourhoods? These questions were explored using data from the 2001 Census of Population, the Incident-Based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2), and land use data provided by the various cities.

    Release date: 2008-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Until recently, there were no national data on the extent to which gays, lesbians and bisexuals were victims of violent crime and discrimination, nor was there any national information about their fear of crime or their perceptions of the criminal justice system.

    Using the GSS self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent to which gays, lesbians and bisexuals were victims of violent crime and spousal violence. It also provides national information about their perception of discrimination, their fear of crime and their perception of the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2008-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2001 Census of Population and self-reported data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, this profile examines certain socio-demographic and economic characteristics of visible minorities in Canada followed by an analysis of the rates and characteristics of violent crimes involving visible minority victims. It also provides information on visible minorities perceptions of safety, discrimination and of the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2008-02-13

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006011
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Using recent police-reported and self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent and nature of victimization and offending in Canada's territories.

    The report finds that northern residents experience higher rates of violent victimization and are more likely to be victims of spousal violence than residents in the rest of Canada. Furthermore, police-reported crime rates in the North are much higher than those in the provinces.

    The report also examines particular factors that seem to be associated with higher rates of victimization and offending. All are more common in the North. These factors include: northern residents are younger on average, than residents in the rest of Canada; the territories have higher proportions of lone-parent families and common-law families; they have higher rates of unemployment; and the territories also have higher proportions of Aboriginal residents compared to the provinces.

    Release date: 2006-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040118410
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report, based on data from the 2002/03 Victim Services Survey, provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada and the clients they served. Data are presented on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, criminal injuries compensation applications and awards, and client characteristics such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization.

    The report also contains some information on transition homes and shelters for abused women and their children that was collected by Statistics Canada's 2001/2002 Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2004-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020058413
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the Homicide Survey and a combination of other statistical data sources this Juristat will examine spousal homicide trends over the period 1974-2000. In 1991 changes were made to the Homicide Survey providing more detailed breakdowns of the relationship between victims and offenders permitting comparisons of married, common-law, separated and divorced couples as well as boyfriends and girlfriends. This allows trends in other intimate partner homicides (e.g. boyfriends and girlfriends) to be examined from 1991-2000. These trends in spousal homicide will be assessed within the context of other factors, including improvements to women’s economic and social well-being (e.g. average annual income, delayed marriage and child-rearing), growth in the availability of emergency services for battered women, trends in spousal victims’ use of social services, trends in reporting spousal violence to the police, and the evolution of charging and prosecution policies.

    Release date: 2002-06-26
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (6)

Analysis (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the major trends in the series on the spatial analysis of crime conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) using geographic information system technology in Canadian cities. The main purpose of this analytical series was to explore the relationships between the distribution of crime and the demographic, socio economic and functional characteristics of neighbourhoods. Questions addressed include: How are police reported criminal incidents distributed across city neighbourhoods? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood associated with factors that are specific to that neighbourhood, such as its demographic, socio-economic, housing and land use characteristics? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood influenced by nearby neighbourhoods? These questions were explored using data from the 2001 Census of Population, the Incident-Based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2), and land use data provided by the various cities.

    Release date: 2008-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Until recently, there were no national data on the extent to which gays, lesbians and bisexuals were victims of violent crime and discrimination, nor was there any national information about their fear of crime or their perceptions of the criminal justice system.

    Using the GSS self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent to which gays, lesbians and bisexuals were victims of violent crime and spousal violence. It also provides national information about their perception of discrimination, their fear of crime and their perception of the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2008-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2001 Census of Population and self-reported data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, this profile examines certain socio-demographic and economic characteristics of visible minorities in Canada followed by an analysis of the rates and characteristics of violent crimes involving visible minority victims. It also provides information on visible minorities perceptions of safety, discrimination and of the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2008-02-13

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006011
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Using recent police-reported and self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent and nature of victimization and offending in Canada's territories.

    The report finds that northern residents experience higher rates of violent victimization and are more likely to be victims of spousal violence than residents in the rest of Canada. Furthermore, police-reported crime rates in the North are much higher than those in the provinces.

    The report also examines particular factors that seem to be associated with higher rates of victimization and offending. All are more common in the North. These factors include: northern residents are younger on average, than residents in the rest of Canada; the territories have higher proportions of lone-parent families and common-law families; they have higher rates of unemployment; and the territories also have higher proportions of Aboriginal residents compared to the provinces.

    Release date: 2006-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040118410
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report, based on data from the 2002/03 Victim Services Survey, provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada and the clients they served. Data are presented on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, criminal injuries compensation applications and awards, and client characteristics such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization.

    The report also contains some information on transition homes and shelters for abused women and their children that was collected by Statistics Canada's 2001/2002 Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2004-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020058413
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the Homicide Survey and a combination of other statistical data sources this Juristat will examine spousal homicide trends over the period 1974-2000. In 1991 changes were made to the Homicide Survey providing more detailed breakdowns of the relationship between victims and offenders permitting comparisons of married, common-law, separated and divorced couples as well as boyfriends and girlfriends. This allows trends in other intimate partner homicides (e.g. boyfriends and girlfriends) to be examined from 1991-2000. These trends in spousal homicide will be assessed within the context of other factors, including improvements to women’s economic and social well-being (e.g. average annual income, delayed marriage and child-rearing), growth in the availability of emergency services for battered women, trends in spousal victims’ use of social services, trends in reporting spousal violence to the police, and the evolution of charging and prosecution policies.

    Release date: 2002-06-26
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: