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  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0035X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A comparison of crime rates between Canada and the United States is often sought by the media, researchers, and policy makers. Recognizing this demand, along with the methodological complexities, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has undertaken the task of assessing the feasibility of comparing police reported statistics between these two countries. This report compares and contrasts the specific offence definitions, classification, and scoring rules of the Canadian and American Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) surveys. Offences are organized according to the type of survey (aggregate versus incident based) and level of analysis (incident level and accused level). Where applicable, the discussion notes modifications that could allow for reliable cross-national comparisons. The report also briefly discusses the potential of comparing detailed offence characteristics.

    Release date: 2001-07-03

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0031X
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration
    Description:

    Data on Aboriginal status contained in this report are based on self-reported (Census) and/or observational (crime) data. They provide information on the nature and extent of Aboriginal involvement in urban, rural and reserve crime as well as the socio-demographic profile of the population of Saskatchewan.

    Based on the 1996 Census data, the Aboriginal population in Saskatchewan tend to be younger, have lower educational levels, higher unemployment rates, and substantially lower incomes than the non-Aboriginal population. Crime rates on reserves were two times higher than rates in rural or urban areas of the province. For violent offences, the rate was almost five times higher on-reserve than in urban or rural areas.

    In all three areas (reserves, urban and rural areas), a larger proportion of adults than youth was accused of a violent offence or an "other" Criminal Code offence. In contrast, youth were more often accused of a property offence than any other offence type. In urban areas, there is an over-representation of Aboriginal persons involved in the criminal justice system. In 1997, more than one-half (52%) of those accused in Prince Albert, Regina and Saskatoon were Aboriginal compared to their 9% proportion in the population of these cities.

    A substantial difference in the male-female ratio of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal accused was found. Although the majority of all those accused were male, there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal female than non-Aboriginal female accused. Aboriginal accused tended to be younger than non-Aboriginal accused. Almost one-third (31%) of Aboriginal accused were aged 12 to 17 years of age compared to 23% of non-Aboriginal accused.

    In the two cities where victim data were available (Regina and Prince Albert), there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal than non-Aboriginal victims of violent crime compared to their proportion in the overall population of these cities. In 1997, 42% of victims in Prince Albert and Regina were Aboriginal, compared to their 10% proportion in the population of these cities.

    Release date: 2000-01-31
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  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0035X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A comparison of crime rates between Canada and the United States is often sought by the media, researchers, and policy makers. Recognizing this demand, along with the methodological complexities, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has undertaken the task of assessing the feasibility of comparing police reported statistics between these two countries. This report compares and contrasts the specific offence definitions, classification, and scoring rules of the Canadian and American Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) surveys. Offences are organized according to the type of survey (aggregate versus incident based) and level of analysis (incident level and accused level). Where applicable, the discussion notes modifications that could allow for reliable cross-national comparisons. The report also briefly discusses the potential of comparing detailed offence characteristics.

    Release date: 2001-07-03

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0031X
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration
    Description:

    Data on Aboriginal status contained in this report are based on self-reported (Census) and/or observational (crime) data. They provide information on the nature and extent of Aboriginal involvement in urban, rural and reserve crime as well as the socio-demographic profile of the population of Saskatchewan.

    Based on the 1996 Census data, the Aboriginal population in Saskatchewan tend to be younger, have lower educational levels, higher unemployment rates, and substantially lower incomes than the non-Aboriginal population. Crime rates on reserves were two times higher than rates in rural or urban areas of the province. For violent offences, the rate was almost five times higher on-reserve than in urban or rural areas.

    In all three areas (reserves, urban and rural areas), a larger proportion of adults than youth was accused of a violent offence or an "other" Criminal Code offence. In contrast, youth were more often accused of a property offence than any other offence type. In urban areas, there is an over-representation of Aboriginal persons involved in the criminal justice system. In 1997, more than one-half (52%) of those accused in Prince Albert, Regina and Saskatoon were Aboriginal compared to their 9% proportion in the population of these cities.

    A substantial difference in the male-female ratio of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal accused was found. Although the majority of all those accused were male, there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal female than non-Aboriginal female accused. Aboriginal accused tended to be younger than non-Aboriginal accused. Almost one-third (31%) of Aboriginal accused were aged 12 to 17 years of age compared to 23% of non-Aboriginal accused.

    In the two cities where victim data were available (Regina and Prince Albert), there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal than non-Aboriginal victims of violent crime compared to their proportion in the overall population of these cities. In 1997, 42% of victims in Prince Albert and Regina were Aboriginal, compared to their 10% proportion in the population of these cities.

    Release date: 2000-01-31
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