Entry, exit, mergers and growth

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Geography

3 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (82)

All (82) (40 to 50 of 82 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006010
    Description:

    It is well-known that small firms are managed differently from large firms, and this paper provides further evidence in support of this idea while suggesting that some small firms are adopting management behaviours of larger firms. Could these small firms be positioning themselves for growth or using organisational innovation as a tool for survival or adopting some formal organization practices early? In 2004, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology provided a list of eight management practices that according to interviews with small and medium-sized firms indicated potential firm growth. The management practices listed were organisational structures; employee feedback surveys; mentoring or coaching programs; and written strategies for marketing; managing growth; commercialisation of intellectual property; succession management; and risk management.

    Release date: 2006-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2006042
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the extent to which productivity growth is the result of firm turnover as output is shifted from one firm to another, driven by the competitive process. Turnover occurs as some firms gain market share and others lose it. Some of the resulting turnover is due to entry and exit. Another part arises from growth and decline in incumbent continuing firms. This paper proposes a method for measuring the impact of firm turnover on productivity growth and shows that it is far more important than many previous empirical studies have concluded. It argues that firm turnover associated with competition is the main source of aggregate labour productivity growth in Canadian manufacturing industries.

    Release date: 2006-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006013
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the findings of a research program aimed at outlining the importance to the firm growth process of competencies that arise from investments in intangible assets. The program has consisted of two parts. First, longitudinal databases have provided a rich set of studies on entry, exit, mergers and other aspects of dynamics related to growth and decline in firm populations. These studies have shown the pervasiveness of growth and decline in the firm population. By themselves, these studies do not demonstrate what strategies differentiate the most successful from the least successful. To do so, we have built a set of firm surveys that allowed profiles to be developed of the type of competencies that stem from investments in organizational capital. In turn, these are linked to administrative data that allow us to classify firms as either growing or declining. We then asked how differences in competencies were related to the performance of firms.

    Release date: 2006-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2006014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of trends in business sector head office employment in Canada from 1999 to 2005. It investigates changes in the number of head offices and head office employment over this period. The paper also examines the effect of foreign ownership on head office employment. It asks how much foreign-controlled firms contribute to Canadian head office employment and employment growth and what happens to head office employment when control of a firm changes from domestic to foreign. The paper also looks at the rate at which head offices enter and exit over time with a view to ascertaining whether the loss of a head office is a rare occurrence or a relatively common event. Finally, the paper presents trends in head office employment across metropolitan areas over the past six years.

    Release date: 2006-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029238
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In Canada, two-in three new businesses do not survive to their fifth year. Business incubators provide space, advice and other support designed to assist new and growing businesses to become established and profitable. There are at least 78 operating business incubators in Canada and their funding totals almost $40 million which are discussed in this article.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006003
    Description:

    The objective of this study was to continue the investigation into growth factors initiated by the previous project: The characteristics of firms that grow from small to medium size in collaboration with the National Research Council Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP). Twenty five interviews augmented the original 25 with a more heterogeneous mix of Canadian technology-based firms led to the development of a framework for assessing the technology phase of small companies (or business lines in larger companies).

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Table: 61-534-X
    Description:

    This publication describes the evolution of the Canadian business environment in light of economic changes in Canada from 1991 to 2001. The publication shows business and employment dynamics in Canada during this period. It provides (1) statistics that show the direct impact of these changes on business creation (firm births) and business destruction (firm deaths); (2) the relative share and distribution of businesses and employment across various categories of firms (Size - small, medium and large size firms, Industry - low-knowledge, medium-knowledge and high-knowledge industries, as well as goods and services industries and by Geography-Province); and (3) it examines survival rates of newly created businesses (lifespan of new businesses).

    Release date: 2006-03-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038761
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For many organizations involved in economic development, business incubation is a key to creating and nurturing new business. There is currently very little information available on the business incubator sector in Canada. A new Statistics Canada pilot survey will collect and benchmark vital information on this largely unknown sector of the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005033
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Plant deaths arise from failure when firms exit an industry. Plant deaths are also associated with renewal when incumbent firms close down plants and modernize their production facilities and start-up new plants.

    The rate of plant deaths affects the amount of change that occurs in labour and capital markets. Plant deaths result in job losses and incur significant human costs as employees are forced to seek other work. The death process also gives rise to capital losses - to the loss of earlier investments that the industrial system had made in productive capacity. This paper makes use of the plant-death date to provide new information on the likely length of life of capital invested in plants.

    This paper measures the death rate over a forty year period for new plants in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It develops a profile of the death rate for entrants as they age. On average, 14% of new plants die in their first year. Over half of new plants die by the age of six. By the age of 15, less than 20% are still alive.

    As a result, manufacturing plants have relatively short lives. The average new plant lives only nine years (17 years if the average is employment-weighted). These rates vary by industry. The longest length of life (13 years) can be found in two industries -primary metals and paper and allied products. The shortest average length of life (less than 8 years) occurs in wood industries.

    Release date: 2005-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2005010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper tracks the growth and decline of information and communications technology (ICT) industries that were synonymous with the so-called new economy boom of the late-1990s and its subsequent bust period in the early 2000s. The analysis focuses on the question of whether the ICT bust has been accompanied by a structural shift illustrated by less firm turnover. It shows that to date there is little evidence of a structural shift. Entry rates of new establishments within the ICT sector were above those of other sectors within the economy during both the ICT boom and bust. This is evidence that both firms and entrepreneurs continued to see opportunities to develop new products and markets even during a time of retrenchment. The location of the ICT sector also show little evidence of a change.

    Release date: 2005-03-02
Data (16)

Data (16) (0 to 10 of 16 results)

  • Table: 33-10-0087-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0007)
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Counts of Entrants, Incumbents, and Exits by North American Industry Classification System, for each province and territory from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program.
    Release date: 2019-11-22

  • Table: 33-10-0088-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0008)
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Entrants, Incumbents, and Exits by firm size, for each province and territory from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program.
    Release date: 2019-11-22

  • Table: 33-10-0165-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0013)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Quarterly
    Description:

    This table contains 170 series, with data for years 2000 - 2017 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada) Business dynamics measure (10 items: Number of active employer businesses in the private sector; Number of entrants; Number of exits; Entry rate; ...) North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (17 items: Private sector; Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting; Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction; Utilities; ...).

    Release date: 2019-10-09

  • Table: 33-10-0164-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0001)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    This table contains 2736 series, with data starting from 2001 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada) Business dynamics measure (16 items: Number of active employer businesses in the private sector; Number of entrants; Number of incumbents; Number of exits; ...) North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (19 items: Private sector; Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting; Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction; Utilities; ...) Firm size (9 items: Private sector; From 0 to less than 100 employees; From 0 to less than 50 employees; Less than 5 employees; ...).

    Release date: 2019-06-10

  • Table: 33-10-0176-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific events occurred in the main geographical market, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Specific events include entry of new competitor(s), exit of competitor(s), increase in competitive behaviour from existing competitors, and decrease in competitive behaviour from existing competitors.

    Release date: 2019-03-13

  • Table: 33-10-0136-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0001)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Active enterprises with one or more employees, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0137-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0002)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Employer enterprise births, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0138-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0003)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Employer enterprise deaths, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0139-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0004)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Number of employer enterprises newly born having survived one year, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0140-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0005)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Number of employer enterprises newly born having survived two years, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07
Analysis (64)

Analysis (64) (60 to 70 of 64 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994072
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the maturation process of firms that enter an industry by constructing new plant and investigates the extent to which improvements in the performance of an entry cohort are the result of a selection process that culls out the most inefficient entrants or of a learning process that allows survivors to improve their performance relative to incumbent firms. Both selection and evolutionary learning are related to post-entry performance. Despite the difference in the effect of selection and learning on the amount of post-entry growth, selection per se is a more important contributor to overall growth of a cohort.

    Release date: 1995-04-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995073
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study investigates differences in the policies being pursued by innovative and non-innovative firms. It focuses on a broad group of strategies -- in marketing, finance, production, management and human resources and asks whether there are key areas in which the strategies being followed by innovative and non-innovative firms differ. It also asks how the activities of firms in each of these areas differs. Finally, it compares the performance of innovative and non-innovative firms. The study finds that innovative firms place a greater emphasis on management, human resources, marketing, financing, government programs and services, and production efficiencies. In most of these areas, innovative firms pursue activities more intensively. Finally, innovative firms are more successful than non-innovative firms.

    Release date: 1995-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994070
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses job turnover data to compare how job creation, job destruction and net job change differ for small and large establishments in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It uses several different techniques to correct for the regression-to-the-mean problem that, it has been suggested, might incorrectly lead to the conclusion that small establishments create a disproportionate number of new jobs. It finds that net job creation for smaller establishments is greater than that of large establishments after such changes are made. The paper also compares the importance of small and large establishments in the manufacturing sectors of Canada and the United States. The Canadian manufacturing sector is shown to have both a larger proportion of employment in smaller establishments but also to have a small establishment sector that is growing in importance relative to that of the United States.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994071
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The statistical observation that small firms have created the majority of new jobs during the 1980s has had a tremendous influence on public policy. Governmentshave looked to the small firm sector for employment growth, and have promoted policies to augment this expansion. However, recent research in the US suggeststhat net job creation in the small firm sector may have been overestimated, relative to that in large firms. This paper addresses various measurement issues raised inthe recent research, and uses a very unique Canadian longitudinal data set that encompasses all companies in the Canadian economy to reassess the issue of jobcreation by firm size. We conclude that over the 1978-92 period, for both the entire Canadian economy and the manufacturing sector, the growth rate of (net)employment decreases monotonically as the size of firm increases, no matter which method of sizing firms is used. The small firm sector has accounted for adisproportionate share of both gross job gains and job losses, and in that aggregate, accounted for a disproportionate share of the employment increase over theperiod. Measurement does matter, however, as the magnitude of the difference in the growth rates of small and large firms is very sensitive to the measurementapproaches used. The paper also produces results for various industrial sectors, asks whether the more rapid growth in industries with a high proportion of smallfirms is responsible for the findings at the all-economy level, and examines employment growth in existing small and large firms (ie excluding births). It is found thatemployment growth in the population of existing small and large firms is very similar.

    Release date: 1994-11-16
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5056
    Description: Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division is engaged in a joint project with the National Research Council's Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) to investigate the characteristics of growth firms.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5157
    Description: The objective of the Entrepreneurship Indicators Database is to provide comprehensive business demography statistics and performance indicators for enterprises in Canada.
Date modified: