Entry, exit, mergers and growth

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (81)

All (81) (30 to 40 of 81 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012022
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines firm entry and exit patterns in the Canadian business sector by using the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program database developed by Statistics Canada. Our primary purpose is to present stylized facts and provide descriptive analysis of the entry and exit patterns in the Canadian economy in order to form a solid foundation for future in-depth theoretical and empirical studies of firm dynamics. In particular, this paper focuses on the relative importance of entrants and exiters in terms of both number and employment, the persistence of entry and exit patterns over time, and the correlation between industry entry and exit rates.

    Release date: 2012-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article discusses firm entry and exit patterns in the Canadian business sector and its constituent industries. The analysis is based on Statistics Canada Longitudinal Employment Analysis program datasets. The article focuses on the relative importance of entrants and exiters, calculated in terms of number of firms and employment, the persistence of entry and exit patterns over time, and the correlation between industry entry and exit rates.

    Release date: 2012-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011072
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The nature of the competitive process that causes a reallocation of market shares within an industry contributes to aggregate productivity growth. This paper extends our understanding of industry differences in the competitive process by examining firm turnover and productivity growth in various services industries in Canada and situating them relative to retailing and manufacturing, two industries which have been the focus of these studies in the past. Seven industries in the services sector, namely wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, air transportation, truck transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, business services and financial services, are examined.

    Release date: 2011-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010061
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We examine the simultaneous effects of real-exchange-rate movements and of tariff reductions on plant death in Canadian manufacturing industries between 1979 and 1996. We find that both currency appreciation and tariff cuts increase the probability of plant death, but that tariff reductions have a much greater effect. Consistent with the implications of recent international-trade models involving heterogeneous firms, we further find that the effect of exchange-rate movements and tariff cuts on exit are heterogeneous across plants - particularly pronounced among least efficient plants. Our results reveal multi-dimensional heterogeneity that current models featuring one-dimensional heterogeneity (efficiency differences among plants) cannot fully explain. There are significant and substantial differences between exporters and non-exporters, and between domestic- and foreign- controlled plants. Exporters and foreign-owned plants have much lower failure rates; however, their survival is more sensitive to changes in tariffs and real exchange rates, whether differences in their efficiency levels are controlled or not.

    Release date: 2010-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009056
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of plants in the manufacturing sector undergoing changes in ownership to further our understanding of the underlying causes of mergers and acquisitions. Previous Canadian studies (Baldwin 1995; Baldwin and Caves 1991) compare the performance of merged plants at the beginning and the end of the 1970s. This paper examines annual changes that occurred over the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to provide a longer-run perspective. In doing so, it outlines the amount of change taking place (both the number of plants affected and the share of employment) and the characteristics of plants that led to their takeover. Differences between foreign and domestic takeovers are also examined.

    Release date: 2009-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2008002
    Description:

    This paper is based on the findings of the Survey of Technology and Electronic Commerce (SECT), which in 2005 included a module on business incubation service providers and users. The results of the Survey of Business Incubators (SBI) were discussed in Joseph, Bordt and Hamdani (2006). The main difference between the two surveys is that the SBI focused on business incubators (BIs), firms that provided business incubation as their main line of activity the criterion used to define industry boundaries in statistical systems whereas the SECT covered all firms that provided business incubation services to new companies, whether it was their main activity or a small part of the business.

    Release date: 2008-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006287
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We model the effects of product market competition on agency costs, and develop two main empirical predictions. First, competition, by reducing agency costs, unambiguously increases the importance firms place on quality improvements. This leads to higher powered incentives, and in turn to increased effort and quality. Second, these effects are increasing in the severity of agency problems, and should be stronger in large, hierarchical corporations (where agency problems are more severe) than in entrepreneurial firms. We test the predictions of our model using a unique dataset with both firm and employee characteristics.

    Release date: 2006-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060109500
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    The number and rate of bankruptcies have fallen steadily since the mid-1990s. However, the liabilities from these failures have trended up, implying that more large firms are going bankrupt. There has been a marked narrowing of regional differences in bankruptcy rates.

    Release date: 2006-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2006015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of the long-run trend in business bankruptcies in Canada, examines the reaction of bankruptcies by region to the stresses associated with fluctuations in the economy and analyses the relation between the incidence of bankruptcies and the economic health of the regions. Over the past 25 years, Canadian businesses have experienced a number of tumultuous periods. After 2 decades of high bankruptcy associated with 2 major recessions and the implementation of 2 free trade agreements in the 1980s and 1990s, bankruptcies have returned by 2005 to levels experienced in the early 1980s. At the same time, the differences between the bankruptcy rates of Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia fell as the intensity of bankruptcies in these 3 provinces converged. Throughout the period, bankruptcies in these 3 provinces moved in concert with unemployment rates in most provinces. The exceptions are Alberta and Nova Scotia, which experienced marked increases in bankruptcies in the early 1990s.

    Release date: 2006-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006010
    Description:

    It is well-known that small firms are managed differently from large firms, and this paper provides further evidence in support of this idea while suggesting that some small firms are adopting management behaviours of larger firms. Could these small firms be positioning themselves for growth or using organisational innovation as a tool for survival or adopting some formal organization practices early? In 2004, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology provided a list of eight management practices that according to interviews with small and medium-sized firms indicated potential firm growth. The management practices listed were organisational structures; employee feedback surveys; mentoring or coaching programs; and written strategies for marketing; managing growth; commercialisation of intellectual property; succession management; and risk management.

    Release date: 2006-10-02
Data (16)

Data (16) (0 to 10 of 16 results)

  • Table: 33-10-0165-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0013)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Quarterly
    Description:

    This table contains 170 series, with data for years 2000 - 2017 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada) Business dynamics measure (10 items: Number of active employer businesses in the private sector; Number of entrants; Number of exits; Entry rate; ...) North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (17 items: Private sector; Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting; Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction; Utilities; ...).

    Release date: 2019-04-03

  • Table: 33-10-0176-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific events occurred in the main geographical market, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Specific events include entry of new competitor(s), exit of competitor(s), increase in competitive behaviour from existing competitors, and decrease in competitive behaviour from existing competitors.

    Release date: 2019-03-13

  • Table: 33-10-0087-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0007)
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Counts of Entrants, Incumbents, and Exits by North American Industry Classification System, for each province and territory from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program.
    Release date: 2018-11-21

  • Table: 33-10-0088-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0008)
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Entrants, Incumbents, and Exits by firm size, for each province and territory from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program.
    Release date: 2018-11-21

  • Table: 33-10-0164-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0001)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    This table contains 2736 series, with data starting from 2001 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada) Business dynamics measure (16 items: Number of active employer businesses in the private sector; Number of entrants; Number of incumbents; Number of exits; ...) North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (19 items: Private sector; Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting; Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction; Utilities; ...) Firm size (9 items: Private sector; From 0 to less than 100 employees; From 0 to less than 50 employees; Less than 5 employees; ...).

    Release date: 2018-06-11

  • Table: 33-10-0136-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0001)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Active enterprises with one or more employees, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0137-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0002)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Employer enterprise births, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0138-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0003)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Employer enterprise deaths, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0139-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0004)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Number of employer enterprises newly born having survived one year, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0140-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0005)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Number of employer enterprises newly born having survived two years, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07
Analysis (63)

Analysis (63) (0 to 10 of 63 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2018407
    Description:

    Entrepreneurial activity has long been argued as an important driver of innovation, job creation, and productivity growth. However, measuring entrepreneurial activity is not easy. Using a newly developed administrative database of firms and workers, the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD), over the period from 2001 to 2013, this paper distinguishes incorporated self-employment from unincorporated self-employment, and compares the entry and exit dynamics of the two types of self-employment by age, gender and province. The large number of observations in CEEDD and its longitudinal nature make this detailed analysis possible.

    Release date: 2018-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2018001
    Description:

    This paper seeks to investigate enterprise dynamics in terms of employment in Canada. The tracking of changes in enterprise size over time can provide a useful overview of the trend in the performance of both the enterprises and the economy as a whole.

    Using the Entrepreneurship Indicators Database for the years 2008 and 2014, this study divides enterprises into nine class sizes based on the number of employees. Then, enterprises that were active in 2008 with one or more employees were tracked to see in which size class they were in 2014. The analysis is based on an approach that consists of building transition matrices using enterprise size classes.

    Release date: 2018-03-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201631515422
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016057
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article addresses the extent to which immigrants contribute to economic growth. For the first time, the business ownership and job-creation activities of immigrants are addressed. A longer, more detailed study is also available.

    Release date: 2016-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015045
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article presents quarterly estimates of employer business entry and exit, and the associated job creation and destruction from the first quarter of 2001 to the third quarter of 2014. These quarterly estimates supplement the annual data provided by Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program (LEAP) by providing more timely, infra-annual data on business and employment dynamics.

    Release date: 2015-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014038
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series describes the results of a data linkage project that created experimental long-term estimates of firm entry and exit rates for the Canadian business sector. It is part of a series of papers that examines firm dynamics using micro-economic data.

    Release date: 2014-08-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014091
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses data from Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program database to study the distribution of annual employment growth rates in Canada over the 2000-to-2009 period, with a special emphasis on firms in the tails of the distribution, referred to here as High-Growth Firms (HGFs) and Rapidly Shrinking Firms (RSFs).

    The study has three objectives. First, it describes the distributions of employment growth rates in Canada to see whether they are consistent with observations in other countries. Second, it quantifies the contribution of HGFs and RSFs to aggregate job creation and destruction. The third objective is to examine, using quantile regression techniques, the role of firm size and firm age in the performance of HGFs and RSFs.

    Release date: 2014-05-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20133449141
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2013030
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This paper describes the patterns of firm entry and exit across provinces in Canada, the relationship of these patterns to differences in industrial structure and the response of firm entry and exit to changes in the economic environment.

    Firm entry and exit play an important role in shaping industrial structure and dynamics. Although entry and exit are ubiquitous, new firms are often associated with new ideas and the provision of innovative goods and services that enhance competition and force incumbents to become more innovative and efficient. Studies have shown the considerable role played by entry and exit in resource reallocation and productivity improvement.

    Release date: 2013-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012028
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the survival characteristics of firms, using microdata from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program (LEAP) of Statistics Canada. Entry rates and survival functions for the 2002 cohort are analyzed. The business sector is disaggregated along industry and size dimensions.

    Release date: 2012-11-07
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5056
    Description: Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division is engaged in a joint project with the National Research Council's Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) to investigate the characteristics of growth firms.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5157
    Description: The objective of the Entrepreneurship Indicators Database is to provide comprehensive business demography statistics and performance indicators for enterprises in Canada.
Date modified: