Business and consumer services

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All (403) (330 to 340 of 403 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044037
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since the introduction of casinos and video lottery terminals in the 1990s, growth in gambling has outstripped that of most other industries. This article updates an earlier examination of employment and government revenue for this industry, as well as average household spending on games of chance.

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995001
    Description:

    The significance of business services in the economy and their role in fostering competitiveness has attracted considerable attention in recent years. This paper, the first of a two-part series, examines the evolution of business services in Canada over the last three decades. It draws a demographic profile of this group from an industrial and a geographical perspective, and analyzes its size, structure, output and growth, R & D involvement as well as the sources of demand and supply of business service commodities.

    The industrial group is made up of a large number of small firms that produce services to be used primarily as intermediate inputs in the production processes of other industries. Business services industries are labour intensive with high value-added and are predominantly located in metropolitan areas. Their growth has outpaced the economy average by a huge margin. Despite the high level of exports, increasing deficits characterize international trade in business service commodities. Business services account for a significant proportion of R & D performed in Canada. They are not immune to economic downturns.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995002
    Description:

    This paper is the second of a two-part series on business services and their role in the Canadian economy. It provides a detailed industrial and geographical profile of employment, illustrates its composition and major characteristics and analyzes its sources of growth by type, gender, occupation, education and other features.

    Business services is a dynamic sector with impressive employment growth, considerably higher than the economy average. Growth has been particularly strong in self-employment, part-time and female employment. Much of the growth in employment originates in the computer services industry. The proportion of managerial and professional positions has been growing relative to clerical ones. Employment is heavily concentrated in urban centres. Individuals employed in these industries are better educated and better paid than the average worker.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995003
    Description:

    The funeral services industry touches, inevitably, on everyone's life. In Canada, this is reflected to a great degree by aspects of the industry's economic performance, as well as by the numerous regulations regarding public health and consumer protection. This paper draws from a number of sources to offer a wide-ranging picture of the industry and an outlook toward its future.The paper begins with an outline of the regulatory environment within which the Canadian funeral services industry operates. It then analyses its financial structure.

    The industry is characterized by above-average profitability and revenue growth, as well as by low rates of exit and entry and rather limited concentration. The section on industry prices illustrates the potential for deriving average funeral costs from aggregate industry data. This is followed by a brief exposition of market demand, which in this industry's context, is measured by the number of deaths. Demographic projections conclusively point to a robust economic outlook for funeral services, particularly in light of the ageing of the Canadian population.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995005
    Description:

    The new reality in the telecommunication service industry is one of competition among service suppliers for market shares. This paper analyzes and presents information from a survey on the demand and diffusion of telecommunication services by Business Services firms.

    Businesses care very much about the prices of these services. At the same time they care about the range and the quality of services offered. They believe that use of such services is indispensable in dealing with their clients and improves their productivity. Currently, the service used the most is facsimile. Large firms use telecommunication services more extensively than others and they are taking full advantage of competition. 61% of the large firms surveyed use at least one alternative supplier. Firms in the computer services industry have a different pattern of use than other industries in the group. There is potential for growth in the use of all services.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1996007
    Description:

    The insurance industry in Canada is at a crossroads. The regulatory authorities are currently exploring whether or not to allow banks to sell insurance products. To gain a better understanding of the impact of such a decision, this paper examines the Canadian property and casualty insurance industry, during the 1987-1992 period. Emphasis is placed on the distinction between the direct insurance and reinsurance markets. The paper also analyzes the industry's market concentration by product line and compares the behaviour and performance of Canadian and foreign-controlled firms.

    The analysis reveals a generally competitive market, in which many small firms co-exist with some very large ones. Foreign-controlled firms outnumber their Canadian counterparts, but are on average smaller and account for only one-quarter of the market. There is a substantial number of firms that specialize in a single product. These firms tend to operate in the largest markets, where they can spread the risk either among a large pool of customers, or through reinsurance. No correlation was found between firm size and efficiency.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1997010
    Description:

    Temporary help is an integral part of the workforce strategy of many businesses. Temporary help workers may be on the payroll of the organization where they work or they may be employees of the firms in personnel supplier industry, placed in the organization under contract.

    The study is an analysis of the personnel supplier industry, commonly known as the temporary help industry. The paper begins with a discussion of the special nature of the industry's product. The role of temporary help in the labour market is compared to just-in-time inventory technology in material handling and bridge financing in the financial markets. It then analyzes the industry's structure in terms of occupations and skill levels, degree of specialization and its determinants, competition at the industry and product levels, major markets and trade. Finally, the growth and cycles in the industry are analyzed in terms of the business demographics, highlighting the effect of firm size and vintage.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1997011
    Description:

    This paper describes the financial intermediation activity of insurance companies and its similarities to the activity of the other financial intermediaries. The financial intermediation activity encompasses the issue of financial instruments such as claims, the use of the funds collected to make loans and the acquisition of a variety of other financial assets. An insurance policy is a claim on the insurance company, albeit a contingent one, just as a bank deposit is a claim on the bank.

    Several major trends seem to be emerging regarding the product mix of these companies. With regard to life insurance, the decline of whole life policies in favour of term policies for almost 20 years seems to be irreversible. Furthermore, there has been a substantial increase in the share of annuities (especially individual annuities) at the expense of life insurance.

    The paper also outlines a cross country comparison of life and non-life insurance industry asset structures. Each type of company establishes its own investment strategy to suit its own needs: life insurance companies prefer long-term assets with returns that maintain purchasing power, and non-life insurance companies generally prefer more liquid assets. Regulation also seems to affect the asset structure at the national and international levels. For a number of countries, including Canada, regulation seems to favour investments in less risky assets, such as government bonds, instead of in the stock market.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998014
    Description:

    This article utilizes information on business startups and closures to examine change and volatility in the service economy. Industries on the cutting edge of technology experience more volatility and are also the fastest growing. Many firms enter the business services and communication industries to seize opportunities offered by technological advances but many are also forced out by the stiff competition. The information-intensive industries (software developers and advertising services firms) are almost twice as volatile as the knowledge-based industries. The latter have low business entry and exit rates because the amount of human capital required to set up a professional practice is large and takes years to acquire.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998015
    Description:

    This brief paper looks at how the services sector fared during the 1981/82 and 1990/92 recessions, offering insights into how the sector could be affected in the event of another recession. It examines recession-period changes in the sector's gross domestic product (GDP), employment patterns and workforce remuneration, compared to those in the rest of the economy. The article concludes that during recessions, these indicators of economic health declined less for services than for the rest of the economy, suggesting that recessions have relatively less impact on the services sector.

    Release date: 1998-11-20
Data (240)

Data (240) (60 to 70 of 240 results)

  • Table: 36-10-0453-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 387-0013)
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Gross domestic product, output and jobs for sport and culture, industry perspective, annual.

    Release date: 2019-04-25

  • Table: 21-10-0221-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 352-0030)
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    The summary statistics by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) which include: operating revenue (dollars x 1,000,000), operating expenses (dollars x 1,000,000), salaries wages and benefits (dollars x 1,000,000), and operating profit margin (by percent), of lessors of residential buildings and dwellings (except social housing projects) (NAICS 531111), annual, for five years of data.

    Release date: 2019-03-27

  • Table: 21-10-0237-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 351-0015)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    This table contains 10 series, with data for years 2014 - 2016 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada);  North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (1 item: Hotels, motor hotels and motels);  Distribution of sales, type of service provided (10 items: Total sales; Room or unit accommodation for travellers; Meals and non-alcoholic beverages, prepared and served or dispensed for immediate consumption; Alcoholic beverages, prepared and served or dispensed for immediate consumption; ...).

    Release date: 2019-03-25

  • Table: 21-10-0239-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 351-0019)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Accommodation services, e-commerce sales, by North American Industry Classification System, (NAICS) Hotels, motor hotels and motels, which includes all members under Sales, (dollars X 1,000,000) & (percent), annual, for two years of data.

    Release date: 2019-03-25

  • Table: 33-10-0102-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 351-0012)
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: The summary statistics by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), which include: operating revenue (dollars x 1,000,000), operating expenses (dollars x 1,000,000), salaries wages and benefits (dollars x 1,000,000), and operating profit margin (by percent), of all NAICS under accommodation services (721), annual, for five years of data.
    Release date: 2019-03-25

  • Table: 33-10-0103-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 351-0013)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: The operating expenses by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), annual (percent) which include all members under industry expenditures, for traveller accommodation, annual (percentage), for five years of data.
    Release date: 2019-03-25

  • Table: 21-10-0169-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 361-0045)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: The summary statistics by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) which include: operating revenue (dollars x 1,000,000), operating expenses (dollars x 1,000,000), salaries wages and benefits (dollars x 1,000,000), and operating profit margin (by percent), of spectator sports, event promoters, artists and related industries (NAICS 7112,7113,7114 & 7115), annual, for five years of data.
    Release date: 2019-03-22

  • Table: 21-10-0170-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 361-0046)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: The operating expenses by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) which include all members under industry expenditures, for spectator sports, event promoters, artists and related industries (NAICS 7112,7113,7114 & 7115), annual (percent), for five years of data.
    Release date: 2019-03-22

  • Table: 21-10-0234-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 361-0112)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    E-commerce sales by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), includes all members under sales, for Canada, for one year of data.

    Release date: 2019-03-22

  • Table: 34-10-0164-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 361-0067)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    This table contains 14 series, with data for years 2013 - 2015 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada); North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (1 item: Spectator sports); Sales and service revenue, type of service (14 items: Total sales of goods and services; Admissions to live performances and events presented by this business; Facility rental revenue; Rental revenue of traveller accommodation; ...).

    Release date: 2019-03-22
Analysis (115)

Analysis (115) (70 to 80 of 115 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000025120
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over two-thirds of Canada's gross domestic product (GDP) and three-quarters of employment result from service activity, and close to 60% of the measured reserach and development is performed in the service sector.

    Release date: 2000-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2000030
    Description:

    Rapid technological change and an emerging global marketplace underscore the need for firms to innovate in order to succeed. The 1997 Survey of Innovation was the first to look at innovation in selected knowledge-based and information-intensive services industries. This article presents estimates of innovation in the engineering services industry over the 1994 to 1996 period. The survey findings show that large firms are very innovative, but that innovation rates are low among small firms. Further, firms that do not innovate are less likely to try because of the risks inherent in innovation activity. Product innovation is the most common of the three types of innovation studied. While organizational change usually leads to innovations yielding new products and more efficient processes, it is the least common form of innovation. Firms cite their clients as being their most important source of innovative ideas, and also acknowledge the importance of research and development (R&D). Firms perceive that market uncertainties and difficulties in obtaining capital are their most significant barriers to innovation.

    Release date: 2000-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19990044946
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article will examine how food service providers and food stores have competed for Canadians' food dollars in the 1990s, and then look at how this intense competition has affected both industries. Each industry has evolved with the objective of improving efficiency and gaining additional market share.

    Release date: 2000-04-14

  • 74. Update on gambling Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000014887
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This note updates national and provincial data for most charts and tables published in two previous Perspectives articles on gambling.

    Release date: 2000-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000143
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper explores differences between innovative and non-innovative establishments in business service industries. It focuses on small establishments that supply core technical inputs to other firms: establishments in computer and related services, engineering, and other scientific and technical services.

    The analysis begins by examining the incidence of innovation within the small firm population. Forty percent of small businesses report introducing new or improved products, processes or organizational forms. Among these businesses, product innovation dominates over process or organizational change. A majority of these establishments reveal an ongoing commitment to innovation programs by introducing innovations on a regular basis. By contrast, businesses that do not introduce new or improved products, processes or organizational methods reveal little supporting evidence of innovation activity.

    The paper then investigates differences in strategic intensity between innovative and non-innovative businesses. Innovators attach greater importance to financial management and capital acquisition. Innovators also place more emphasis on recruiting skilled labour and on promoting incentive compensation. These distinctions are sensible - among small firms in R&D-intensive industries, financing and human resource competencies play a critical role in the innovation process.

    A final section examines whether the obstacles to innovation differ between innovators and non-innovators. Innovators are more likely to report difficulties related to market success, imitation, and skill restrictions. Evidence of learning-by-doing is more apparent within a multivariate framework. The probability of encountering risk-related obstacles and input restrictions is higher among establishments that engage in R&D and use intellectual property rights, both key elements of the innovation process. Many obstacles to innovation are also more apparent for businesses that stress financing, marketing, production or human resource strategies.

    Release date: 2000-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000127
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In studies of business innovation, the term innovation process is used to describe (i) the array of sources and objectives that culminate in the act of innovation, (ii) the set of market effects that result from innovation, and (iii) the obstacles that firms encounter when pursuing innovation strategies. An examination of the innovation process is thus designed to bring about a more comprehensive understanding of the characteristics that innovative firms share, as well as of those characteristics that set innovators apart from other businesses. The Survey of Innovation, 1996 examined innovation in three dynamic service industries: communications, financial services, and technical business services.

    This paper explores the principal findings to emerge from the Survey of Innovation, 1996. Two themes are apparent. In the first instance, many elements of the innovation process are common to all the service industries studied, such as an emphasis on product innovation, a strong customer orientation, and a commitment to service quality. Beyond these common elements, however, differences in competitive pressures across these industries serve to engender important differences in innovation strategies. Accordingly, much of what we can ultimately learn about the innovation process occurs at the industry level.

    Release date: 2000-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19990034860
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article presents, for the first time, findings about the engineering services industry. This industry is comprised of firms primarily engaged in providing engineering services. It offers services ranging from feasibility studies to design, project management and commissioning (or the start-up of the operation) of projects.

    Release date: 2000-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19990034862
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The travel agency industry plays an essential role in Canada's tourism industry, and has ripple effects on other sectors of the Canadian economy. This article presents 1997 data on the industry's general characteristics, revenue and cost structure, client base, marketing methods, and trade patterns. To offer more context, these results are sometimes compared to those of previous years.

    Release date: 2000-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999028
    Description:

    This article focuses on characteristics of primary Internet service providers (ISPs), that is, firms reporting that 50% or more of their revenues come from ISP activities. It looks at challenges facing ISPs including barriers to growth, competing in the Internet sector, complaints and practices regarding offensive content and conduct, as well as ISPs' perceptions of what is important to their customers. These items are analysed after classifying ISPs into four different size categories, enabling one to see any differences in perception or conduct between ISPs of varying sizes.

    Release date: 2000-01-10

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X19970014747
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This chapter describes four specific industry sectors : accomodation services, restaurant services, travel agencies and tour operators, and Canadian tourist attractions.

    Release date: 1999-11-24
Reference (47)

Reference (47) (0 to 10 of 47 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15-601-X
    Description:

    This publication outlines the conceptual and statistical framework of the services sector in the accounts. The methodology and data sources used to calculate estimates of services in the current-price input-output accounts are described. Specific sources and methods are outlined for determining inputs, outputs and gross domestic product of service industries in the business sector.

    Release date: 2001-07-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2328
    Description: The Consulting Engineering Services Price Index series (CESPI) is an annual survey of consulting engineers in Canada, collecting financial and wage information that is used to produce price indexes measuring changes in prices for consulting engineer services.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2333
    Description: The Informatics Professional Services Price Index measures annual price changes for various informatics services such as data processing and hosting; general purpose software design; computer systems design; and custom software design services.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2334
    Description: The Accounting Services Price Index (ASPI) collects information on the price of several accounting services such as auditing, taxation, and bookkeeping. From this data, price indexes are constructed measuring changes in these prices over time.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2336
    Description: The Traveller Accommodation Services Price Index is a monthly series measuring the price change for short-term accommodation services. Data are collected for leisure and business clients and are used to estimate monthly and quarterly price indexes for the short-term traveller accommodation services industry.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2410
    Description: This survey collects the financial and operating data needed to develop national and regional economic policies and programs.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2418
    Description: This survey collects the financial and operating data needed to develop national and regional economic policies and programs.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2419
    Description: This survey provides information to measure the economic performance and health of the Food Services and Drinking Places Industry in the Canadian economy.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2420
    Description: This survey collects the financial and operating data needed to develop national and regional economic policies and programs.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2423
    Description: This survey collects the financial and operating data needed to develop national and regional economic policies and programs.
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