Business and consumer services

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All (410) (340 to 350 of 410 results)

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995003
    Description:

    The funeral services industry touches, inevitably, on everyone's life. In Canada, this is reflected to a great degree by aspects of the industry's economic performance, as well as by the numerous regulations regarding public health and consumer protection. This paper draws from a number of sources to offer a wide-ranging picture of the industry and an outlook toward its future.The paper begins with an outline of the regulatory environment within which the Canadian funeral services industry operates. It then analyses its financial structure.

    The industry is characterized by above-average profitability and revenue growth, as well as by low rates of exit and entry and rather limited concentration. The section on industry prices illustrates the potential for deriving average funeral costs from aggregate industry data. This is followed by a brief exposition of market demand, which in this industry's context, is measured by the number of deaths. Demographic projections conclusively point to a robust economic outlook for funeral services, particularly in light of the ageing of the Canadian population.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995005
    Description:

    The new reality in the telecommunication service industry is one of competition among service suppliers for market shares. This paper analyzes and presents information from a survey on the demand and diffusion of telecommunication services by Business Services firms.

    Businesses care very much about the prices of these services. At the same time they care about the range and the quality of services offered. They believe that use of such services is indispensable in dealing with their clients and improves their productivity. Currently, the service used the most is facsimile. Large firms use telecommunication services more extensively than others and they are taking full advantage of competition. 61% of the large firms surveyed use at least one alternative supplier. Firms in the computer services industry have a different pattern of use than other industries in the group. There is potential for growth in the use of all services.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1996007
    Description:

    The insurance industry in Canada is at a crossroads. The regulatory authorities are currently exploring whether or not to allow banks to sell insurance products. To gain a better understanding of the impact of such a decision, this paper examines the Canadian property and casualty insurance industry, during the 1987-1992 period. Emphasis is placed on the distinction between the direct insurance and reinsurance markets. The paper also analyzes the industry's market concentration by product line and compares the behaviour and performance of Canadian and foreign-controlled firms.

    The analysis reveals a generally competitive market, in which many small firms co-exist with some very large ones. Foreign-controlled firms outnumber their Canadian counterparts, but are on average smaller and account for only one-quarter of the market. There is a substantial number of firms that specialize in a single product. These firms tend to operate in the largest markets, where they can spread the risk either among a large pool of customers, or through reinsurance. No correlation was found between firm size and efficiency.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1997010
    Description:

    Temporary help is an integral part of the workforce strategy of many businesses. Temporary help workers may be on the payroll of the organization where they work or they may be employees of the firms in personnel supplier industry, placed in the organization under contract.

    The study is an analysis of the personnel supplier industry, commonly known as the temporary help industry. The paper begins with a discussion of the special nature of the industry's product. The role of temporary help in the labour market is compared to just-in-time inventory technology in material handling and bridge financing in the financial markets. It then analyzes the industry's structure in terms of occupations and skill levels, degree of specialization and its determinants, competition at the industry and product levels, major markets and trade. Finally, the growth and cycles in the industry are analyzed in terms of the business demographics, highlighting the effect of firm size and vintage.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1997011
    Description:

    This paper describes the financial intermediation activity of insurance companies and its similarities to the activity of the other financial intermediaries. The financial intermediation activity encompasses the issue of financial instruments such as claims, the use of the funds collected to make loans and the acquisition of a variety of other financial assets. An insurance policy is a claim on the insurance company, albeit a contingent one, just as a bank deposit is a claim on the bank.

    Several major trends seem to be emerging regarding the product mix of these companies. With regard to life insurance, the decline of whole life policies in favour of term policies for almost 20 years seems to be irreversible. Furthermore, there has been a substantial increase in the share of annuities (especially individual annuities) at the expense of life insurance.

    The paper also outlines a cross country comparison of life and non-life insurance industry asset structures. Each type of company establishes its own investment strategy to suit its own needs: life insurance companies prefer long-term assets with returns that maintain purchasing power, and non-life insurance companies generally prefer more liquid assets. Regulation also seems to affect the asset structure at the national and international levels. For a number of countries, including Canada, regulation seems to favour investments in less risky assets, such as government bonds, instead of in the stock market.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998014
    Description:

    This article utilizes information on business startups and closures to examine change and volatility in the service economy. Industries on the cutting edge of technology experience more volatility and are also the fastest growing. Many firms enter the business services and communication industries to seize opportunities offered by technological advances but many are also forced out by the stiff competition. The information-intensive industries (software developers and advertising services firms) are almost twice as volatile as the knowledge-based industries. The latter have low business entry and exit rates because the amount of human capital required to set up a professional practice is large and takes years to acquire.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998015
    Description:

    This brief paper looks at how the services sector fared during the 1981/82 and 1990/92 recessions, offering insights into how the sector could be affected in the event of another recession. It examines recession-period changes in the sector's gross domestic product (GDP), employment patterns and workforce remuneration, compared to those in the rest of the economy. The article concludes that during recessions, these indicators of economic health declined less for services than for the rest of the economy, suggesting that recessions have relatively less impact on the services sector.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998016
    Description:

    This article looks at the rapid growth of the architectural, engineering and other scientific and technical services (AES) industry and, when possible, its three sub-industries, from 1982 to 1994. Industry growth, employment and remuneration patterns are compared to those in the overall Canadian economy. The article also examines characteristics of the AES industry's workforce, particularly the employees' education qualifications, occupations and demographic characteristics.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998017
    Description:

    This article describes and quantifies the growth of Canada's dynamic software and computer services industry in the 1990s. Results show that the industry's ouput has doubled in the 1990s, and that its workforce's size and remuneration levels also grew rapidly. The article explores the industry's three largest growth areas (professional services, data processing services and software products development) and offers insights into why these areas are growing. Also examined are international policy developments affecting the industry, including the Voorburg Group and recent trade agreements. The article also discusses the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) and how it will improve statistical measurements of this, and other, service industries.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998018
    Description:

    The logistics services industry, an emerging component of the services sector, strives to ensure an efficient flow of products through the supply chain. Logistics services have grown in importance with deregulation, technological change, and the greater integration of production and distribution across national boundaries. This article looks at how these factors affected the evolution of logistics services. It also discusses the challenges associated with statistically measuring the emerging logistics services industry.

    Release date: 1998-11-20
Data (245)

Data (245) (60 to 70 of 245 results)

  • Table: 21-10-0232-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 355-0012)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    E-commerce sales for North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) food services and drinking places, includes all members under sales, for Canada, for one year of data.

    Release date: 2019-12-20

  • Table: 21-10-0249-01
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Methods used for e-commerce sales for businesses locations that reported e-commerce sales for food and drinking places, for Canada, for three years of data.

    Release date: 2019-12-20

  • Table: 21-10-0003-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 351-0009)
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: The summary statistics by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) which include: operating revenue (dollars x 1,000,000), operating expenses (dollars x 1,000,000), salaries wages and benefits (dollars x 1,000,000), and operating profit margin (by percent), of travel agencies (NAICS 56151) & tour operators (NAICS 56152) & other travel arrangement and reservation services (NAICS 56159), annual, for five years of data.
    Release date: 2019-12-19

  • Table: 21-10-0004-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 351-0011)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: The operating expenses by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) which include all members under industry expenditures, for travel agencies (NAICS 56151) & tour operators (NAICS 56152), annual (percent), for five years of data.
    Release date: 2019-12-19

  • Table: 21-10-0130-01
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Total sales broken down by type of service provided for travel agencies and tour operators classified under North American Industrial Classification System for Canada, for 3 years of data.

    Release date: 2019-12-19

  • Table: 21-10-0236-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 351-0022)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Travel arrangement services, sales by type of client, by North American Industry Classification System, (NAICS) 56151 Travel agencies, (NAICS) 56152 Tour operators, which includes all members under Type of client, annual, (percent), Canada, for five years of data.

    Release date: 2019-12-19

  • Table: 21-10-0238-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 351-0016)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Travel arrangement services, e-commerce sales, by North American Industry Classification System, (NAICS) 56151 Travel agencies, (NAICS) 56152 Tour operators, which includes all members under sales, annual (dollars X 1,000,000) & (percent), Canada, for five years of data.

    Release date: 2019-12-19

  • Table: 21-10-0247-01
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Methods used for e-commerce sales for businesses locations that reported e-commerce sales for the travel arrangement services industry in Canada, for 3 years of data.

    Release date: 2019-12-19

  • Table: 21-10-0257-01
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    Total sales of goods and services broken down by revenue and destination for travel agencies and tour operators classified under North American Industrial Classification System for Canada, for three years of data.

    Release date: 2019-12-19

  • Table: 21-10-0057-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 361-0036)
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: The summary statistics by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) which include: operating revenue (dollars x 1,000,000), operating expenses (dollars x 1,000,000), salaries wages and benefits (dollars x 1,000,000), and operating profit margin (by percent), of all NAICS under amusement parks and arcades (7131) and other amusement and recreation industries (7139), annual, for four years of data.
    Release date: 2019-12-12
Analysis (116)

Analysis (116) (0 to 10 of 116 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20201343304
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2020004
    Description:

    An analysis of trends in Canadian consumer demand and sales using transaction data for grocery products amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Release date: 2020-04-08

  • Articles and reports: 16-508-X2019004
    Description:

    This article presents emissions estimates related to spending on food and beverage products and services. These estimates are based on an input-output model that combines physical flow data on greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by industry with economic data on production and consumption of goods and services.

    Release date: 2019-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017067
    Description:

    This Economic Insights compares the performance of automotive manufacturers and service providers since the 2008-2009 recession. The report highlights the structural declines in manufacturing, as export-oriented Canadian manufacturers have lost market share to Mexico. On account of strong post-recession growth in consumer demand for new motor vehicles in Canada, trends for the service industries have differed from manufacturing when comparing performance for output, employment and earnings. The paper will outline the differences in post-recession performance for these key indicators.

    Release date: 2017-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2016081
    Description:

    The Provincial and Territorial Culture Indicators (PTCI) are timely economic estimates of culture and sport in Canada. The PTCI are an extension of the more comprehensive Provincial and Territorial Culture Satellite Account and measure the economic importance of culture and sport in terms of output, gross domestic product and employment across Canada for reference years 2010 to 2014.

    Release date: 2016-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011072
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The nature of the competitive process that causes a reallocation of market shares within an industry contributes to aggregate productivity growth. This paper extends our understanding of industry differences in the competitive process by examining firm turnover and productivity growth in various services industries in Canada and situating them relative to retailing and manufacturing, two industries which have been the focus of these studies in the past. Seven industries in the services sector, namely wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, air transportation, truck transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, business services and financial services, are examined.

    Release date: 2011-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2009083
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines trends in the legal and accounting industries, and highlights key characteristics of these industries in relation to the professional sector as a whole and to the Canadian economy. Trends in employment, earnings, output as measured by gross domestic product, capital expenditures, rates of self-employment and of incorporation are investigated. Also socio-economic characteristics of the workforce in legal and accounting services industries are examined.

    Release date: 2009-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200800210622
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Fishing or angling has historically been a popular leisure activity for both Canadians and visitors alike. This article provides a portrait of recreational fishing in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-06-25

  • 9. Kids' Sports Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110573
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article will examine trends in organized sports participation of children aged 5 to 14, and the important role that the family plays. It will also look at the factors that influence children's participation in sports including parental involvement in sports, socio-demographic characteristics of the family, and geography.

    Release date: 2008-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2008053
    Description:

    With the growth of the service economy, business support services have become more important to the Canadian economy. Changes in business practices such as outsourcing have been made possible by advances in telecommunications technology. Consequently, the business support services industry, which includes credit agencies, telephone call centres, and document preparation and business service centres, has experienced steady growth. Telephone call centres in particular have been identified as potential catalysts for regional development. Research in this area has tended to deal with employment issues (e.g. job creation) or with case studies of firms or communities. Using an industry life cycle approach, this study examines the changing location of telephone call centres.

    Release date: 2008-02-27
Reference (48)

Reference (48) (20 to 30 of 48 results)

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