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  • Table: 82-577-X
    Description:

    Optional content to the Canadian Community Health Survey was negotiated by some provinces or territories and for some health regions. The data from that content provide information on the following variables: self esteem, mastery, alcohol dependence, sedentary activities, changes made to improve health, decision latitude at work, home care utilization, social support, influenza immunization, bicycle-helmet use, condom use, tobacco alternatives, smoking cessation aids, physical check-up, eye examination, dental visits, breast examinations and breast self-examinations, blood pressure check, suicidal thoughts and attempts, distress, moods, and spirituality.

    Related tables to the Canadian Community Health Survey provide information on the following variables: unmet health-care needs, prostate-specific antigen and former smokers.

    Release date: 2003-03-03

  • Table: 89-579-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered 'Yes' to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private and some collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, in the fall of 2001.

    These tables contain data on the number of adults and children with disabilities, disability rates, as well as the type and severity of disability, by age and sex, for Canada and the provinces.

    Release date: 2002-12-03

  • Table: 13-10-0435-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 104-5008)
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Frequency: Every 2 years
    Description: Body mass index (BMI), Canadian standard, by age group and sex, household population aged 20 to 64 excluding pregnant women, territories.
    Release date: 2002-05-03

  • Table: 13-10-0436-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 104-5009)
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Frequency: Every 2 years
    Description: Body mass index (BMI), International standard, by age group and sex, household population aged 20 to 64 excluding pregnant women, territories.
    Release date: 2002-05-03

  • Public use microdata: 82M0009X
    Description:

    The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) used the Labour Force Survey sampling frame to draw the initial sample of approximately 20,000 households starting in 1994 and for the sample top-up this third cycle. The survey is conducted every two years. The sample collection is distributed over four quarterly periods followed by a follow-up period and the whole process takes a year. In each household, some limited health information is collected from all household members and one person in each household is randomly selected for a more in-depth interview.

    The survey is designed to collect information on the health of the Canadian population and related socio-demographic information. The first cycle of data collection began in 1994, and continues every second year thereafter. The survey is designed to produce both cross-sectional and longitudinal estimates. The questionnaires includes content related to health status, use of health services, determinants of health, a health index, chronic conditions and activity restrictions. The use of health services is probed through visits to health care providers, both traditional and non-traditional, and the use of drugs and other mediciations. Health determinants include smoking, alcohol use and physical activity. A special focus content for this cycle includes family medical history with questions about certain chronic conditions among immediate family members and when they were acquired. As well, a section on self care has also been included this cycle. The socio-demographic information includes age, sex, education, ethnicity, household income and labour force status.

    Release date: 2000-12-19

  • Public use microdata: 82M0010X
    Description:

    The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) program is designed to collect information related to the health of the Canadian population. The first cycle of data collection began in 1994. The institutional component includes long-term residents (expected to stay longer than six months) in health care facilities with four or more beds in Canada with the principal exclusion of the Yukon and the Northwest Teritories. The document has been produced to facilitate the manipulation of the 1996-1997 microdata file containing survey results. The main variables include: demography, health status, chronic conditions, restriction of activity, socio-demographic, and others.

    Release date: 2000-08-02

  • Public use microdata: 89M0007X
    Description:

    Information in this microdata file refers to survey data collected in September - November, 1994 for persons 15 years of age and older in Canada's ten provinces. The survey's main data objectives were to measure the prevalence and patterns of alcohol and other drug use, to assess harm and other consequences of drug use and to evaluate trends in recent patterns of use. Canada's Alcohol and Other Drugs Survey (CADS) also updates and expands upon data collected in the first survey, the National Alcohol and Other Drugs Survey (NADS), conducted in 1989.

    Release date: 2000-07-07

  • Table: 84-214-X
    Description:

    This compendium of vital statistics includes summary data on births, deaths, marriages and divorces. The introduction covers the data sources, data quality, and methods pertaining to each event, and includes a glossary defining the terms used. The first chapter is a brief overview of vital statistics for 1996. Subsequent chapters treat marriage, divorce, birth, fetal and infant mortality, total mortality, causes of death, vital statistics by census division, and international comparisons. Most charts and tables show Canada data for 1986 though 1996, while the charts and tables for causes of death show Canada data for 1979 through1996. Data for the provinces and territories are usually shown for 1995 and 1996. Appendices include population denominator data, age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) calculation methods, and leading causes of death methodology.

    Release date: 1999-11-25

  • Table: 82-570-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This is the second version of the Statistical report on the health of Canadians. Like the original in 1996, this report provides a comprehensive and detailed statistical overview of the health status of Canadians and the major determinants of that status. The original report was created for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Advisory Committee on Population Health, which has also commissioned this update. The broad purpose of the report is to help policy-makers and program planners identify priority issues and measure progress in the domain of population health.

    The Statistical report is meant to be a tool for learning as well as planning. The data identify populations at risk; suggest associations between health determinants, health status, and population characteristics; raise questions about the reasons for the widespread differences among the provinces and territories; and illustrate areas where Canada's health information system is robust, and others where it is relatively weak. These and other themes are touched on in the 11 section introductions of the Statistical Report and developed more fully in the companion publication, Toward a healthy future: second report on the health of Canadians. These publications are available at the Health Canada web site at: http://www.hc-sc.ca.

    Release date: 1999-09-16

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111299
    Description:

    Statistics in the tables of Section B are in two divisions. Series Bl-81 contain data on vital statistics and series B82-543 on health. Data on social welfare, formerly contained in this section, are presented separately in Section C.

    Release date: 1999-07-29
Analysis (1,310)

Analysis (1,310) (1,290 to 1,300 of 1,310 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19960033017
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    From 1974 to 1994, the number of children Canadian women are likely to have during their lifetime decreased. This downturn in fertility meant that the annual number of live births rose only slightly during this period, even though it marked the prime childbearing years for the baby-boom generation. As they pursued higher education and employment in the paid workforce, women have postponed childbearing. Consequently, the average age of women giving birth has risen. More than a quarter of women over age 30 who have a baby are first-time mothers. And by starting families later in life, women tend to have fewer children. In addition, largely because of the growing number of common-law relationships, over a quarter of all births are to unmarried women. Using data provided by the provincial and territorial Vital Statistics Registries, this article examines national and provincial/territorial trends in births and fertility from 1974 to 1994.

    Release date: 1996-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950032449
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The increase in life expectancy that would result from the elimination of certain diseases and the resulting change in hospital utilization vary, depending on the disease. In some cases, life expectancy would rise and total days spent in hospital would decline, while in others, the gain in life expectancy would be accompanied by a increase in hospital days. For instance, if mental health disorders were eliminated, the increase in life expectancy at age 45 would be minimal: from 34.9 to 35.3 years, but time spent in hospital would decline from 168 to 151 days. By contrast, if diseases of the circulatory system were eliminated, life expectancy at age 45 would rise from 34.9 to 41.6 years, but time spent in hospital would also rise: from 168 to 290 days. Elimination of not only mental illnesses but also injuries and poisoning and diseases of the nervous system has the potential of both increasing life expectancy and reducing hospital use.

    Release date: 1996-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950032450
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Abridged life tables centred on 1991 were produced from the 1991 Canadian census, net census undercoverage estimates, and death data from 1990 to 1992. The sensitivity of life table values to differing methods of estimation and population estimates was investigated. The results from four methods by Greville, Chiang, and Keyfitz were compared, and population undercoverage, were used to test the effects of method and type of population estimate on life table values. The results indicate that the method used to derive the estimates had much less influence on the life table values than did the choice of population estimate. The change life expectancy at birth due to the method of calculation chosen was at most 15 days, whereas the change due to the population estimate chosen was about 73 days. Since there are age, sex and provincial variations in net undercoverage rates, life expectancies differed accordingly.

    Release date: 1996-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950032451
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The official 1990-92 detailed life tables show a continuation of the trend toward longer life expenctancy for Canadians. Life expectancy at birth has reached an all-time high: 80.89 years for females and 74.55 years for males. Recent improvements in life expectancy are attributable to many factors, including declines in infant mortality, cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease, and mortality from accidents and poisoning.

    Release date: 1996-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950032452
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    As the population ages, discussion increasingly focuses on how to keep people in the community and out of health care instituions. But when health fails, the only option may be long-term residential care.

    Release date: 1996-02-09

  • 1,296. Transition homes Archived
    Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950032453
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In every province and territory, abused women and their children can find refuge in a variety of facilities that provide residential services. In 1994-95, transition homes and similar institutions recorded more than 85,000 admissions. Most of the women admitted were escaping physical abuse by a current or previous spouse or common-law partner.

    Release date: 1996-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1993010
    Description:

    This paper evaluates the results of the questions related to activity limitation and its impact on labour market activity from the January 1993 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) test.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950022506
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from Statistics Canada's 1988 and 1993 General Social Survey (GSS), this article examines the incidence and consequences of accidents in Canada and the characteristics of respondents aged 15 and over who were involved in them. In 1993, an estimated 3.9 million Canadians reported that they had been involved in 4.8 million accidents in the previous 12 months. Motor vehicle accidents and sports accidents were the most frequent, each accounting for about 27% of incidents, followed by accidents at work (21%) and at home (14%). Accidents were most common among young people, particularly men. However, from 1988 to 1993, there was a decline in the proportion of adults reporting accidents, and the sharpest drop was for the age group most at risk - 15-to 24-year-olds. Most of the downturn was attributable to a decrease in the motor vehicle accident rate. Since alcohol is known to be associated with accidents, reduced consumption during the same period may have been partly responsible for the decline in accident rates. Other factors that may have contributed include stricter enforcement of impaired driving legislation and speeds limits, and improvements in automobile safety. Nonetheless, despite the decline in accidents rates, the toll taken by accidents reported in 1993 was considerable: 80% of accidents caused personal injury, and almost half of these resulted in medical attention in a hospital. Overall, 62% of accidents resulted in activity-loss days, and 29% involved bed-disability days. Hospital utilization costs associated with these accidents in 1993 were about $1.5 billion. As well, about one-third of accidents involved out-of-pocket expenses, totalling $791 million. Moreover, accidents continue to be the leading cause of death among persons under age 44.

    Release date: 1995-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950022507
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Indicators based on the registration of vital events are used to determine the health status of populations. The need for these indicators at the regional and community levels has grown with the trend toward decentralization in the delivery of health services. Such indicators are important because they affect funding and the types of service that are provided. Health status indicators tend to be associated with variables such as the level of urbanization or socioeconomic status. According to four indicators - mortality ratios for all causes of death, mortality ratios for external causes of death, infant mortality ratios, and low birth weight live birth ratios - some areas of British Columbia, specifically along the border with Alberta, have relatively good health, although the characteristics of these regions suggest that this should not be the case. However, a much different picture emerges when vital event data registered in Alberta for residents of these areas of British Columbia are considered. This article shows that for adequate health planning and program implementation, some communities need data from neighbouring provinces. It illustrates the effect of incorporating Alberta data into the development of health status indicators for British Columbia. It also suggests that similar adjustments may be necessary for data compiled in other provinces.

    Release date: 1995-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950022508
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The positive relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and longevity has long been established. Comparable evidence exists for SES and morbidity, but observations of this relationship tend to be limited to specific health indicators. In this article, a comprehensive quantitative measure of health status, the Health Utility Index (HUI), is applied to an analysis of the relationship between SES the health status of people aged 25 and over in Ontario. The HUI, based on a set of questions included in the 1990 Ontario Health Survey (OHS), provides a summary index of the health of each respondent. The OHS data show that lower levels of education, income, and occupation are associated with lower HUI values. Health status differences across SES groups are greater in late middle-age than at younger or older ages, a pattern consistent with the findings of other studies. The development of summary indicators like the HUI is part of a larger effort to construct measures for monitoring the health of Canadians.

    Release date: 1995-11-20
Reference (103)

Reference (103) (100 to 110 of 103 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5267
    Description: Canadian Health Survey on Seniors

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5271
    Description: This survey collects the financial and operating data needed to develop national and regional economic policies and programs.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5283
    Description: The main objective of the Survey on Maternal Health is to collect information from biological mothers about their pregnancy and postpartum experiences.

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