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  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010066
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Household Spending and from its predecessor, the Survey of Family Expenditures, this paper investigates the relative incomes of retirement-age and working-age Canadians from 1969 to 2006, taking into account both explicit household income and the implicit income generated by owner-occupied housing. Over this 37-year period, the explicit incomes of retirement-age households increased at a more rapid pace than those of working-age households. Implicit income from owner-occupied housing also increased rapidly during this time, matching the rate at which the explicit income of retirement-age households increased. On average, this implicit source of earnings raised the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over) by 16%. Taking both forms of income into account, the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over), relative to the incomes of working-age households (aged 40 to 49), increased from 45% in 1969 to 59% in 2006. During this period, Canadians invested in housing assets that provided additional income upon retirement.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201000411373
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A focus on the use of transportation by older Canadians has important implications because of the large number of baby boomers that will soon be turning 65. This article looks at transportation used by senior Canadians, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey: Healthy Aging.

    Release date: 2010-12-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-646-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Survey of Older Workers is sponsored by the Labour Market Policy branch of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The survey is designed to assess the labour market intentions and transitions of older Canadians. The subject matter is intended to identify "factors" that influence the decision to retire or remain working. In this context pensions, general finances, the role of dependents, the nature of work, health considerations etc., will be of primary concern in trying to understand workers' intentions and motivations.

    Release date: 2010-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010613251
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines associations between health factors and early exits from the labour market. Using all available cycles of the National Population Health Survey, the likelihood of workers age 40 to 52 in 1994/1995 stopping work in the subsequent 12 years is examined controlling for sociodemographic factors.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010713253
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Most Canadians retire by the age of 65. Some, however, continue to work well into their senior years. This article uses census data to study labour market activity among senior men and women. Trends in seniors employment rates and occupational and industrial profiles are outlined. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with employment and work intensity.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010811331
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which family income of individuals in their mid-fifties is 'replaced' by other sources of income during the retirement years. It does so by tracking various cohorts of tax filers as they age from their mid-fifties to their late seventies and over. Earlier work examined this question for the 50% of the population with strong labour market attachment during their mid-fifties. This paper extends that work to include 80% to 85% of the population.

    Release date: 2010-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010328
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent to which family income during working years is replaced during the retirement years. It does so by tracking cohorts as they age from their mid-50s to their late 70s, using a taxation-based longitudinal data source that covers 26 years from 1982 to 2007. Earlier work by the same authors examined this question with respect to the 50% of the population with strong labour force attachment during their mid-50s. This paper extends that work to include almost all Canadians (80% to 85% of the population). The adult-equivalent-adjusted family income available to the median Canadian during his or her late 70s is about 80% of that observed when the same person was in his or her mid-50s (a replacement rate of 0.8). Replacement rates in retirement are negatively correlated with income earned around age 55. Median replacement rates are 1.1 among individuals in the bottom income quintile, 0.75 in the middle quintile, and 0.7 in the top quintile. In retirement, public pensions and other transfers more than replace earnings and other income of bottom quintile individuals. However, some individuals have very low replacement rates. For example, 20% of individuals in the middle income quintile had replacement rates below 0.6. More recent cohorts had higher family incomes in retirement than did earlier cohorts as a result of higher earnings and private-pension income.

    Release date: 2010-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010064
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper estimates the implicit income generated by the home equity of working-age and retirement-age households. In so doing, it expands our understanding of Canadians' preparation for retirement by taking into account the services that homeowners realize as a result of having invested in their homes. On the basis of both the 2006 Survey of Household Spending and the 2006 Census of Population, we find that housing services make an important contribution to household income. When estimates of the services provided by the equity invested in housing are added to traditional estimates of income, the income of retirement-age households is increased by 9% to 12% for those in the 60-to-69 age class and by 12% to 15% for those in the 70-plus age class. In turn, this additional income reduces the difference in income between working-age and retirement-age households that own their own homes. According to the Survey of Household Spending, net incomes decline by about 45% between the peak household earning years and the 70-plus retirement-age class. This figure is reduced to 42% when the contribution of housing services is taken into account. The Census provides a similar picture: the gap in incomes is 38% when net income alone is considered and 35% when one accounts for housing services.

    Release date: 2010-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010327
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD), this paper compares the earnings replacement rates achieved in retirement by a sample of married and common-law couples in which the husband was aged 55 to 57 in 1991. Emphasis is placed on the outcomes experienced by couples in which one spouse or both spouses had registered pension plan (RPP) coverage and by couples without RPP coverage. The earnings replacement rates achieved by couples without RPP coverage are more widely dispersed than those of couples with RPP coverage. When compared at the mid-points of the pre-retirement earnings distributions, the median earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are about three to six percentage points lower than those of couples with RPP coverage. In contrast, the average earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are generally six to twelve percentage points higher than those of couples with RPP coverage.

    Release date: 2010-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201000311289
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on data from the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging, this study provides up-to-date estimates of the prevalence of good health, chronic conditions and health-promoting factors among seniors and adults aged 45 to 64.

    Release date: 2010-07-21
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  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010066
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Household Spending and from its predecessor, the Survey of Family Expenditures, this paper investigates the relative incomes of retirement-age and working-age Canadians from 1969 to 2006, taking into account both explicit household income and the implicit income generated by owner-occupied housing. Over this 37-year period, the explicit incomes of retirement-age households increased at a more rapid pace than those of working-age households. Implicit income from owner-occupied housing also increased rapidly during this time, matching the rate at which the explicit income of retirement-age households increased. On average, this implicit source of earnings raised the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over) by 16%. Taking both forms of income into account, the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over), relative to the incomes of working-age households (aged 40 to 49), increased from 45% in 1969 to 59% in 2006. During this period, Canadians invested in housing assets that provided additional income upon retirement.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201000411373
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A focus on the use of transportation by older Canadians has important implications because of the large number of baby boomers that will soon be turning 65. This article looks at transportation used by senior Canadians, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey: Healthy Aging.

    Release date: 2010-12-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-646-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Survey of Older Workers is sponsored by the Labour Market Policy branch of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The survey is designed to assess the labour market intentions and transitions of older Canadians. The subject matter is intended to identify "factors" that influence the decision to retire or remain working. In this context pensions, general finances, the role of dependents, the nature of work, health considerations etc., will be of primary concern in trying to understand workers' intentions and motivations.

    Release date: 2010-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010613251
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines associations between health factors and early exits from the labour market. Using all available cycles of the National Population Health Survey, the likelihood of workers age 40 to 52 in 1994/1995 stopping work in the subsequent 12 years is examined controlling for sociodemographic factors.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010713253
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Most Canadians retire by the age of 65. Some, however, continue to work well into their senior years. This article uses census data to study labour market activity among senior men and women. Trends in seniors employment rates and occupational and industrial profiles are outlined. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with employment and work intensity.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010811331
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which family income of individuals in their mid-fifties is 'replaced' by other sources of income during the retirement years. It does so by tracking various cohorts of tax filers as they age from their mid-fifties to their late seventies and over. Earlier work examined this question for the 50% of the population with strong labour market attachment during their mid-fifties. This paper extends that work to include 80% to 85% of the population.

    Release date: 2010-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010328
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent to which family income during working years is replaced during the retirement years. It does so by tracking cohorts as they age from their mid-50s to their late 70s, using a taxation-based longitudinal data source that covers 26 years from 1982 to 2007. Earlier work by the same authors examined this question with respect to the 50% of the population with strong labour force attachment during their mid-50s. This paper extends that work to include almost all Canadians (80% to 85% of the population). The adult-equivalent-adjusted family income available to the median Canadian during his or her late 70s is about 80% of that observed when the same person was in his or her mid-50s (a replacement rate of 0.8). Replacement rates in retirement are negatively correlated with income earned around age 55. Median replacement rates are 1.1 among individuals in the bottom income quintile, 0.75 in the middle quintile, and 0.7 in the top quintile. In retirement, public pensions and other transfers more than replace earnings and other income of bottom quintile individuals. However, some individuals have very low replacement rates. For example, 20% of individuals in the middle income quintile had replacement rates below 0.6. More recent cohorts had higher family incomes in retirement than did earlier cohorts as a result of higher earnings and private-pension income.

    Release date: 2010-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010064
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper estimates the implicit income generated by the home equity of working-age and retirement-age households. In so doing, it expands our understanding of Canadians' preparation for retirement by taking into account the services that homeowners realize as a result of having invested in their homes. On the basis of both the 2006 Survey of Household Spending and the 2006 Census of Population, we find that housing services make an important contribution to household income. When estimates of the services provided by the equity invested in housing are added to traditional estimates of income, the income of retirement-age households is increased by 9% to 12% for those in the 60-to-69 age class and by 12% to 15% for those in the 70-plus age class. In turn, this additional income reduces the difference in income between working-age and retirement-age households that own their own homes. According to the Survey of Household Spending, net incomes decline by about 45% between the peak household earning years and the 70-plus retirement-age class. This figure is reduced to 42% when the contribution of housing services is taken into account. The Census provides a similar picture: the gap in incomes is 38% when net income alone is considered and 35% when one accounts for housing services.

    Release date: 2010-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010327
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD), this paper compares the earnings replacement rates achieved in retirement by a sample of married and common-law couples in which the husband was aged 55 to 57 in 1991. Emphasis is placed on the outcomes experienced by couples in which one spouse or both spouses had registered pension plan (RPP) coverage and by couples without RPP coverage. The earnings replacement rates achieved by couples without RPP coverage are more widely dispersed than those of couples with RPP coverage. When compared at the mid-points of the pre-retirement earnings distributions, the median earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are about three to six percentage points lower than those of couples with RPP coverage. In contrast, the average earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are generally six to twelve percentage points higher than those of couples with RPP coverage.

    Release date: 2010-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201000311289
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on data from the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging, this study provides up-to-date estimates of the prevalence of good health, chronic conditions and health-promoting factors among seniors and adults aged 45 to 64.

    Release date: 2010-07-21
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