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  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20000005255
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since the 1980s, abuse of older Canadians has gained the attention of service providers, researchers, lobbyists, as well as policy makers. Abuse can include physical, psychological or financial mistreatment of adults over the age of 65 years. To date, a lack of data has made it difficult to quantify and truly understand the nature of abuse against older adults.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990045066
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Entry into home care was related to an increase in perceived emotional support and a transition to living alone, even when several demographic and health factors were taken into account.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990045067
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although health status is strongly associated with residence in a long-term health care facility, the absence of a spouse, low income, low education, and advanced age are also important factors.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034934
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Our improving life expectancy in Canada does not necessarily mean more years in poor health. Older adults can expect an improved quality as well as an extended quantity of life compared with 20 years ago.

    Aging does not necessarily result in a continuous decline in health. Close to half of older Canadians who reported fair or poor health in 1994/95 reported an improvement in their health in 1998/99.

    The rate of institutionalization for Canadians aged 65 or older declined from 16% in 1981 to 14% in 1996, even with increases in life expectancy.

    The rate of activity limitation among adults aged 65 to 74 who live at home has declined since 1978; among adults aged 75 or older who live at home, the rate has not changed since 1978.

    The socioeconomic trends observed in younger age groups continue among older adults, although less so. Seniors who did not graduate from high school have increased odds of dying; those with low incomes have increased odds of institutionalization.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000147
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper revisits trends in the level and distribution of income among Canadian seniors in the context of what is arguably the major source of change in these trends since the end of the seventies, the maturation of Canada's public and private earnings-related pension systems. The expanded role of earnings-related pensions in the 1980s and 1990s is largely the result of changes that occurred in the 1950s and 1960s. The Canada and Quebec Pension Plans (C/QPP) were implemented in 1966 and the first cohort to receive full C/QPP benefits turned 65 in 1976. Cohorts retiring after this period were also the beneficiaries of the expansion of private occupational pensions that took place between the 1950s and the 1970s. The author relies on a detailed decomposition of income by source to show that not only did the maturation of these earnings-related programs produce a substantial increase in average real incomes but also to a substantial reduction in income inequality among the elderly, due mainly to C/QPP benefits. Rising real incomes went disproportionately to lower income seniors contributing to the well-known decline in low-income rates among the elderly.

    Release date: 2000-03-06

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19990015676
    Description:

    As the population ages, a greater demand for long-term care services and, in particular, nursing homes is expected. Policy analysts continue to search for alternative, less costly forms of care for the elderly and have attempted to develop programs to delay or prevent nursing-home entry. Health care administrators required information for planning the future demand for nursing-home services. This study assesses the relative importance of predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics in predicting and understanding nursing-home entry.

    Release date: 2000-03-02
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  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20000005255
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since the 1980s, abuse of older Canadians has gained the attention of service providers, researchers, lobbyists, as well as policy makers. Abuse can include physical, psychological or financial mistreatment of adults over the age of 65 years. To date, a lack of data has made it difficult to quantify and truly understand the nature of abuse against older adults.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990045066
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Entry into home care was related to an increase in perceived emotional support and a transition to living alone, even when several demographic and health factors were taken into account.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990045067
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although health status is strongly associated with residence in a long-term health care facility, the absence of a spouse, low income, low education, and advanced age are also important factors.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990034934
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Our improving life expectancy in Canada does not necessarily mean more years in poor health. Older adults can expect an improved quality as well as an extended quantity of life compared with 20 years ago.

    Aging does not necessarily result in a continuous decline in health. Close to half of older Canadians who reported fair or poor health in 1994/95 reported an improvement in their health in 1998/99.

    The rate of institutionalization for Canadians aged 65 or older declined from 16% in 1981 to 14% in 1996, even with increases in life expectancy.

    The rate of activity limitation among adults aged 65 to 74 who live at home has declined since 1978; among adults aged 75 or older who live at home, the rate has not changed since 1978.

    The socioeconomic trends observed in younger age groups continue among older adults, although less so. Seniors who did not graduate from high school have increased odds of dying; those with low incomes have increased odds of institutionalization.

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000147
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper revisits trends in the level and distribution of income among Canadian seniors in the context of what is arguably the major source of change in these trends since the end of the seventies, the maturation of Canada's public and private earnings-related pension systems. The expanded role of earnings-related pensions in the 1980s and 1990s is largely the result of changes that occurred in the 1950s and 1960s. The Canada and Quebec Pension Plans (C/QPP) were implemented in 1966 and the first cohort to receive full C/QPP benefits turned 65 in 1976. Cohorts retiring after this period were also the beneficiaries of the expansion of private occupational pensions that took place between the 1950s and the 1970s. The author relies on a detailed decomposition of income by source to show that not only did the maturation of these earnings-related programs produce a substantial increase in average real incomes but also to a substantial reduction in income inequality among the elderly, due mainly to C/QPP benefits. Rising real incomes went disproportionately to lower income seniors contributing to the well-known decline in low-income rates among the elderly.

    Release date: 2000-03-06
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19990015676
    Description:

    As the population ages, a greater demand for long-term care services and, in particular, nursing homes is expected. Policy analysts continue to search for alternative, less costly forms of care for the elderly and have attempted to develop programs to delay or prevent nursing-home entry. Health care administrators required information for planning the future demand for nursing-home services. This study assesses the relative importance of predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics in predicting and understanding nursing-home entry.

    Release date: 2000-03-02
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