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  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003046
    Description:

    Services constitute the single most important industry in Canada's economy, with 68% of total gross domestic product, 75% of employment and 53% of consumer spending. However, this industry is not widely perceived as being Canada's spearhead of research and development (R&D), a role more traditionally assigned to the manufacturing sector. Still, services are becoming an increasingly important force in R&D, and this is why we should reconsider the true role played by R&D in the service sector. This article, in fact, sets out to quantify R&D activities within the service sector.

    Here are some highlights of this exploratory study:

    - In 2002, the commercial service sector was responsible for 28.5% of all R&D expenditures for the economy as a whole.

    - In 2000, 36.6% of all personnel assigned full time to R&D worked in the commercial service sector.

    - Quantification of the amounts spent on R&D from within the service sector does not necessarily correspond to traditional industrial classifications. For example, R&D is primarily performed in such sectors as biotechnology, software, telecommunications, the environment and logistics, which are not included in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) classification scheme.

    - Several service sector activities are very labour intensive and require highly skilled R&D workers. For example, of all employees performing R&D in the field of biotechnology, 23% hold doctorates or master's degrees.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20030087875
    Description:

    This bulletin presents recent information on the performance and funding of Federal government expenditures on scientific activities, 2003-2004. The statistics presented are derived from the survey of science and technology (S&T) activities of federal departments and agencies. The data in this publication are consistent with expenditures of departments and agencies as reported in the Main Estimates 2003-2004, but do not reflect changes to 2003-2004 spending plans which may result from supplementary estimates or other departmental planning decisions.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003013
    Description:

    This paper used data from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey (BUDS) to look into bioproduct development using biotechnologies. Results show that the development of bioproducts has become an intrinsic part of the activities of Canadian biotechnology firms.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20030077876
    Description:

    Canada's economic competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in Research and development. The number of Research and development personnel is a supplementary measure to the statistics on intramural expenditures on Research and development. The Frascati Manual1 states that "Data on the utilisation of scientific and technical personnel provide concrete measurements for international comparisons of resources devoted to Research and development "

    Release date: 2003-11-07

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003010
    Description:

    Canadian health research is conducted in universities, teaching hospitals, business enterprises, government laboratories and private non-profit organizations. This research is funded from a variety of sources including public, private, domestic and foreign.

    This paper provides more detailed information than was previously released in Science Statistics (Catalogue no. 88-001, vol. 27, no. 6). This is the fourth time the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) of Statistics Canada has published an estimate of health research and development spending in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-11-07

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003011
    Description:

    Canada's economic growth and competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development, as well as the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in research and development (R&D). The number of R&D personnel is a supplementary measure to the statistics on intramural expenditures on R&D.

    In this report, we present some statistical estimates and definitions concerning R&D personnel. Data on R&D personnel are derived from surveys and from estimates based on various data sources.

    Release date: 2003-11-07

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036650
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The trend towards the globalization of factor, product and financial markets is drawing an increasing amount of attention. Work is underway to develop methodologies and to harmonize among countries data on the economic activities of globally operating corporations. An understanding of their business models, corporate strategies and organizational structures is also needed to gather and, more importantly, interpret information about their innovation activities. This note identifies four main models of globally operating corporations according to their impact on technology transfer and innovation in their host countries.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036654
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many people in the federal and provincial governments, in universities, hospitals and other organizations are asking the same questions about the commercialization of university research: Is it increasing? What are the benefits? How do universities and regions compare? Statistics Canada's 2001 Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector shows that commercialization activities took a giant leap from 1999 to 2001. This article includes the results for universities only.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036655
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although there were over 8,000 companies in Canada reporting research and development (R&D) expenditures in 2000, only 30 of these accounted for over half of all business R&D spending. The result is that only a small number of companies in key industries have a significant impact on Canada's total $11.4 billion business R&D spending. The highest levels of concentration of R&D spending were found in the communications equipment manufacturing sector, while computer systems design and related services showed the lowest.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036656
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's Survey of Innovation 1999 collected information on the innovation activities of firms in Canadian manufacturing and selected natural resource industries. The results provide insight into why a firm chooses to take the path of innovation or opts to be a non-innovator. For most non-innovators, the perception is that innovation is not required or is irrelevant to their industry. Non-innovative firms analysed here are those that did not introduce a new or significantly improved product or process in the previous three years and that did not carry out any innovative activities during the survey period.

    Release date: 2003-10-20
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Analysis (43)

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  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20030037883
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents the geographic distribution of federal government science and technology expenditures. Data on federal government expenditures on science and technology are found in Volume 26 No. 5 of this publication series, released in October 2002. In both this and the earlier bulletin, science and technology (S&T) expenditures are the sum of expenditures on research and development (R&D) and on related scientific activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2003-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003003
    Description:

    Results show that biotechnology companies in Canada are experiencing rapid growth and that Statistics Canada is now capturing more biotechnology activity. For example, between 1997 and 1999, Canadian biotechnology firms grew in number with core biotechnology firms increasing from 282 firms to 358. They brought in $1.9 billion in biotechnology revenues in 1999, compared with $813 million in 1997; they spent around $827 million on biotechnology research and development in 1999, compared with $494 million in 1997.

    Release date: 2003-03-10

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2003001
    Description:

    This paper provides a review of the GERD/GDP ratio and other measures of R&D intensity. Canada is compared with two groups of countries: the other members of the G7 and a group of countries in the OECD that reported significantly improved R&D performance over the period 1989 to 1999.

    Release date: 2003-02-28

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20030027884
    Description:

    The provincial government sector consists of all provincial government departments, ministries and agencies and provincial research organizations. The Provincial Research Organizations (PRO) are surveyed separately and are not reported here. The PRO values are reported in Volume 26, number 8 of this serie.

    Release date: 2003-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016468
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    New small firms with more long-term debt in their balance sheets tend to devote a smaller percentage of their investment expenditure to research and development. A recent Statistics Canada study on financing innovation in new small firms provides insight into an important segment of the small-firm population, namely successful entrants.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016469
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Once viewed as weak in research and development (R&D) capabilities, the service sector in Canada is emerging as an increasingly attractive place for foreign-controlled firms to practice R&D. This is a reflection of the increasing technological opportunities and expertise offered by the service sector. Multinational corporations often undertake R&D abroad to acquire new insights or apply the knowledge they already have to foreign markets.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016474
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    In 2001, there were 375 biotechnology innovator firms in Canada, an increase of just under 5% from the 358 firms in 1999. Analysis beyond these overall statistics discloses a dynamic churning that is occurring among sectors, provinces and size groups.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016475
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Data from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey show that human resources in biotechnology increased substantially between 1999 and 2001. In this article, we attempt to answer two questions: What are the characteristics of the human resources engaged in the biotechnology field in Canada? Moreover, what are the main factors that contributed to the growth of these human resources in 2001?

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016476
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canadian biotechnology is gaining momentum. More firms are getting their products onto the markets and increasing revenues. With the human health sector leading the way, biotechnology revenues rose by a massive 343% for the 1997 to 2001 period, reaching $3.5 billion in 2001. During this same period, the number of firms increased by 33%.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-001-X20030017885
    Description:

    Data on science and technology (S&T) expenditures and person-years allocated to biotechnology for the year 2001-2002 were collected from selected federal departments and agencies. The criterion for selection was significant activity in this field. Survey results contribute to the work of the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy.

    Release date: 2003-02-07
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-622-M2003001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report focusses on new studies that analyse information and communications technology industries, science-based industries, high-technology industries and firms, the knowledge-based economy, and knowledge workers.

    Release date: 2003-05-15
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