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  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970137998
    Description:

    This release provides data on the Research and development activities of the private non-profit sector.

    Release date: 1997-12-18

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970128034
    Description:

    Industrial R&D expenditures for environmental protection represented 2% of total R&D expenditures in 1995. This small share, which has been maintained since 1990, is likely to be an underestimate due to those R&D investments mainly undertaken to improve production efficiency. In such cases, R&D expenditures on environmental protection would not be reported despite the additional benefits to the environment that may be achieved.

    Release date: 1997-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 88-001-X19970117999
    Description:

    The analysis presented in this report is a joint project of the Bio-Industries Branch of Industry Canada and the Science and Technology Redesign Project of Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1997-11-21

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970108000
    Description:

    Canada's economic competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in research and development.

    Release date: 1997-11-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1997107
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The debate over the appropriate function of government policy for research and development (R&D) subsidies brings into focus the different roles that are played by large and small firms in the innovation process. Small firms, it is often claimed, have different tendencies to use R&D facilities than large firms and, therefore, require the development of special programs that are directed at this sector. This paper examines the differences in the innovation profiles of small and large firms, and how R&D intensity and efficacy varies across different size classes. It investigates the contribution that R&D makes to success in the small and medium-sized population and the types of policies that small firms feel are the most appropriate to reduce the impediments to innovation that they face.

    The paper finds a number of differences between large and small firms in the tendency to innovate and to use R&D facilities. Small firms can be divided into two groups. The first group consists of firms that resemble large firms in that they perform R&D and generate new products and processes primarily through their own efforts. The second are those who rely upon customers and suppliers for their sources of ideas for innovation. Large firms, by way of contrast, tend to rely more heavily on R&D. While they too rely on networks for ideas, their networks focus more heavily on relationships with other firms that belong to the same firm.

    Most of the differences between small and large firms are explained by the fact that firms of different sizes specialize in different parts of the production process. Firms of different sizes serve different niches; they each have their own advantages. Small firms are more flexible but can suffer from cost disadvantages due to scale. They overcome their disadvantages by networking with their customers and by showing the same flexibility in their R&D process that they exhibit elsewhere. They rely less on dedicated R&D facilities and more on the flexible exploitation of R&D as opportunities arise. They also network with customers in order to adopt their suggestions for new innovations.

    Release date: 1997-09-17

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970098001
    Description:

    The Higher Education sector is composed of "all universities, colleges of technology and other institutes of post-secondary education, whatever their source of finance or legal status.

    Release date: 1997-08-20

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970088002
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Research and development is defined as creative work undertaken on a systematic basis to increase the stock of scientific and technical knowledge and to use this knowledge in new applications.

    Release date: 1997-08-15

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970068027
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1995, software research and development expenditures account for 36% of all industrial research and development performed.

    Release date: 1997-07-21

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970058005
    Description:

    The statistics presented in this bulletin are derived from our latest survey of industrial research and development activities in Canada.

    Release date: 1997-05-30

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970048006
    Description:

    This document provides recent information on the performance and funding of Federal Government Expenditures on Scientific Activities, 1997-98.

    Release date: 1997-05-07
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Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970137998
    Description:

    This release provides data on the Research and development activities of the private non-profit sector.

    Release date: 1997-12-18

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970128034
    Description:

    Industrial R&D expenditures for environmental protection represented 2% of total R&D expenditures in 1995. This small share, which has been maintained since 1990, is likely to be an underestimate due to those R&D investments mainly undertaken to improve production efficiency. In such cases, R&D expenditures on environmental protection would not be reported despite the additional benefits to the environment that may be achieved.

    Release date: 1997-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 88-001-X19970117999
    Description:

    The analysis presented in this report is a joint project of the Bio-Industries Branch of Industry Canada and the Science and Technology Redesign Project of Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1997-11-21

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970108000
    Description:

    Canada's economic competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in research and development.

    Release date: 1997-11-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1997107
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The debate over the appropriate function of government policy for research and development (R&D) subsidies brings into focus the different roles that are played by large and small firms in the innovation process. Small firms, it is often claimed, have different tendencies to use R&D facilities than large firms and, therefore, require the development of special programs that are directed at this sector. This paper examines the differences in the innovation profiles of small and large firms, and how R&D intensity and efficacy varies across different size classes. It investigates the contribution that R&D makes to success in the small and medium-sized population and the types of policies that small firms feel are the most appropriate to reduce the impediments to innovation that they face.

    The paper finds a number of differences between large and small firms in the tendency to innovate and to use R&D facilities. Small firms can be divided into two groups. The first group consists of firms that resemble large firms in that they perform R&D and generate new products and processes primarily through their own efforts. The second are those who rely upon customers and suppliers for their sources of ideas for innovation. Large firms, by way of contrast, tend to rely more heavily on R&D. While they too rely on networks for ideas, their networks focus more heavily on relationships with other firms that belong to the same firm.

    Most of the differences between small and large firms are explained by the fact that firms of different sizes specialize in different parts of the production process. Firms of different sizes serve different niches; they each have their own advantages. Small firms are more flexible but can suffer from cost disadvantages due to scale. They overcome their disadvantages by networking with their customers and by showing the same flexibility in their R&D process that they exhibit elsewhere. They rely less on dedicated R&D facilities and more on the flexible exploitation of R&D as opportunities arise. They also network with customers in order to adopt their suggestions for new innovations.

    Release date: 1997-09-17

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970098001
    Description:

    The Higher Education sector is composed of "all universities, colleges of technology and other institutes of post-secondary education, whatever their source of finance or legal status.

    Release date: 1997-08-20

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970088002
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Research and development is defined as creative work undertaken on a systematic basis to increase the stock of scientific and technical knowledge and to use this knowledge in new applications.

    Release date: 1997-08-15

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970068027
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1995, software research and development expenditures account for 36% of all industrial research and development performed.

    Release date: 1997-07-21

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970058005
    Description:

    The statistics presented in this bulletin are derived from our latest survey of industrial research and development activities in Canada.

    Release date: 1997-05-30

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19970048006
    Description:

    This document provides recent information on the performance and funding of Federal Government Expenditures on Scientific Activities, 1997-98.

    Release date: 1997-05-07
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