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  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2017001
    Description:

    This working paper profiles Canadian firms involved in the development and production of Bioproducts. It provides data on the number and types of Bioproducts firms in 2015, covering bioproducts revenues, research and development, use of biomass, patents, products, business practices and the impact of government regulations on the sector.

    Release date: 2017-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016063
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article highlights notable changes in the pace and composition of industrial research and development (R&D) spending in Canada during the 2000-to-2013 period. The analysis is based on historical time series data that conclude with the publication of estimates for reference year 2013. New data on industrial R&D will be released in the coming months. These new survey results begin with estimates for reference year 2014 and reflect conceptual and methodological changes designed to enhance the scope and relevance of the program. Following the introduction of these changes, a study on the break in the time series will be conducted later in 2017. his article highlights trends in industrial R&D spending in advance of the upcoming release of the new data. The analysis underscores the extent to which support for higher R&D spending in more recent years has come from resource-based companies.

    Release date: 2017-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016386
    Description:

    This paper asks whether research and development (R&D) drives the level of competitiveness required to successfully enter export markets and whether, in turn, participation in export markets increases R&D expenditures. Canadian non-exporters that subsequently entered export markets in the first decade of the 2000s are found to be not only larger and more productive, as has been reported for previous decades, but also more likely to have invested in R&D. Both extramural R&D expenditures (purchased from domestic and foreign suppliers) and intramural R&D expenditures (performed in-house) increase the ability of firms to penetrate export markets. Exporting also has a significant impact on subsequent R&D expenditures; exporters are more likely to start investing in R&D. Firms that began exporting increased the intensity of extramural R&D expenditures in the year in which exporting occurred.

    Release date: 2016-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201200211753
    Description:

    Nonresponse in longitudinal studies often occurs in a nonmonotone pattern. In the Survey of Industrial Research and Development (SIRD), it is reasonable to assume that the nonresponse mechanism is past-value-dependent in the sense that the response propensity of a study variable at time point t depends on response status and observed or missing values of the same variable at time points prior to t. Since this nonresponse is nonignorable, the parametric likelihood approach is sensitive to the specification of parametric models on both the joint distribution of variables at different time points and the nonresponse mechanism. The nonmonotone nonresponse also limits the application of inverse propensity weighting methods. By discarding all observed data from a subject after its first missing value, one can create a dataset with a monotone ignorable nonresponse and then apply established methods for ignorable nonresponse. However, discarding observed data is not desirable and it may result in inefficient estimators when many observed data are discarded. We propose to impute nonrespondents through regression under imputation models carefully created under the past-value-dependent nonresponse mechanism. This method does not require any parametric model on the joint distribution of the variables across time points or the nonresponse mechanism. Performance of the estimated means based on the proposed imputation method is investigated through some simulation studies and empirical analysis of the SIRD data.

    Release date: 2012-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2009026
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents estimates of intangible investment in Canada for the purpose of innovation, advertising and resource extraction. It first expands upon work by Beckstead and Gellatly (2003), Baldwin and Hanel (2003), Beckstead and Gellatly (2003), Beckstead and Vinodrai (2003) and Baldwin and Beckstead (2003) who argue that the scope of innovative activity extends beyond research and development (R&D) as defined by the Frascati Manual. It extends the definition of innovative activities to include all scientific and engineering expenditures - regardless of whether they are market-based or produced with a firm. The paper also considers expenditures on intangible items such as brands or resource exploration.

    The paper contributes to the existing literature by creating intangible investment estimates (science and engineering knowledge, advertising, mineral exploration by industry) using Statistics Canada's high quality and internally consistent databases. It produces estimates that accord with other intangibles studies (Corrado, Hulten and Sichel 2005, 2006; Jalava, Ahmavarra and Alanen 2007) and shows that traditional R&D type investment estimates account for about a quarter of intangible science and engineering investments.

    Release date: 2009-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110817
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Investment in research and development (R&D) is important to the economy of a country, and its measurement is an essential component of the Canadian statistical system. The publication, Gross Domestic Expenditures on Research and Development in Canada and the Provinces (GERD), 1997 to 2008 (Statistics Canada, 2008a) provides a statistical picture of the Canadian system of research and development. These data inform public policy, help benchmark Canadian performance against other countries (OECD, 2008 and 2007) and provide essential input to the study of the impact of science and technology on the life of Canadians.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110818
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) collects and reports on statistics from its member countries for various subject matter fields. In order to properly compare these statistics, the OE,CD develops common concepts and measurement standards. For the field of research and development (R&D) statistics, the OECD's proposed standard practice for R&D surveys is detailed in the Frascati Manual (OECD, 2002). However, not all OECD countries' national practices align with the Frascati Manual standards. The OECD receives Canadian R&D data from surveys conducted by Statistics Canada. While the general concepts of the Frascati Manual are integrated with Statistics Canada's survey framework, national variations in reporting with the OECD still exist. One of these national differences in data presentation can be found in the allocation of public general university funds.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210740
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article highlights expenditures and personnel devoted annually to scientific research and development (R&D) by Canadian private non-profit (PNP) organizations. These organizations play an important role in the Canadian R&D landscape: providing financial support to researchers in universities and other laboratories and performing their own research.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007007
    Description:

    Results from the Survey of Innovation 2003 raised some interesting questions. First, an unexpected one-third of establishments in R&D services were not innovative. According to the guidelines of the Oslo Manual, innovative establishments are those that introduced a new or significantly improved product or process on to the market or into production, within a specified interval. Second, many of these non-innovative establishments indicated that satisfying existing customers was irrelevant to their firms success. This was very different response from all other types of firms.

    This working paper provides a potential explanation of these unexpected results, as well as an overview of available information on establishments in R&D services (NAICS 5417) in the context of professional services generally. The paper assembles descriptive data to show that non-innovative establishments in R&D services differ significantly from other non-innovative establishments and, while not innovative, they are nevertheless highly inventive. It presents some evidence to suggest that they are venture firms (firms relying on infusions of investment capital rather than revenues from sales to sustain their operations) and proposes a specific set of indicators that would facilitate resolution of the nature of firms in this industry group.

    Release date: 2007-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210329
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The scientific research and development services industry is arousing growing interest among analysts and researchers. The interest aroused by this industry is due in part to its major contribution to total industrial expenditures on research and development (R&D) in Canada.

    Release date: 2007-10-09
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Analysis (136)

Analysis (136) (0 to 10 of 136 results)

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2017001
    Description:

    This working paper profiles Canadian firms involved in the development and production of Bioproducts. It provides data on the number and types of Bioproducts firms in 2015, covering bioproducts revenues, research and development, use of biomass, patents, products, business practices and the impact of government regulations on the sector.

    Release date: 2017-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016063
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article highlights notable changes in the pace and composition of industrial research and development (R&D) spending in Canada during the 2000-to-2013 period. The analysis is based on historical time series data that conclude with the publication of estimates for reference year 2013. New data on industrial R&D will be released in the coming months. These new survey results begin with estimates for reference year 2014 and reflect conceptual and methodological changes designed to enhance the scope and relevance of the program. Following the introduction of these changes, a study on the break in the time series will be conducted later in 2017. his article highlights trends in industrial R&D spending in advance of the upcoming release of the new data. The analysis underscores the extent to which support for higher R&D spending in more recent years has come from resource-based companies.

    Release date: 2017-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016386
    Description:

    This paper asks whether research and development (R&D) drives the level of competitiveness required to successfully enter export markets and whether, in turn, participation in export markets increases R&D expenditures. Canadian non-exporters that subsequently entered export markets in the first decade of the 2000s are found to be not only larger and more productive, as has been reported for previous decades, but also more likely to have invested in R&D. Both extramural R&D expenditures (purchased from domestic and foreign suppliers) and intramural R&D expenditures (performed in-house) increase the ability of firms to penetrate export markets. Exporting also has a significant impact on subsequent R&D expenditures; exporters are more likely to start investing in R&D. Firms that began exporting increased the intensity of extramural R&D expenditures in the year in which exporting occurred.

    Release date: 2016-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201200211753
    Description:

    Nonresponse in longitudinal studies often occurs in a nonmonotone pattern. In the Survey of Industrial Research and Development (SIRD), it is reasonable to assume that the nonresponse mechanism is past-value-dependent in the sense that the response propensity of a study variable at time point t depends on response status and observed or missing values of the same variable at time points prior to t. Since this nonresponse is nonignorable, the parametric likelihood approach is sensitive to the specification of parametric models on both the joint distribution of variables at different time points and the nonresponse mechanism. The nonmonotone nonresponse also limits the application of inverse propensity weighting methods. By discarding all observed data from a subject after its first missing value, one can create a dataset with a monotone ignorable nonresponse and then apply established methods for ignorable nonresponse. However, discarding observed data is not desirable and it may result in inefficient estimators when many observed data are discarded. We propose to impute nonrespondents through regression under imputation models carefully created under the past-value-dependent nonresponse mechanism. This method does not require any parametric model on the joint distribution of the variables across time points or the nonresponse mechanism. Performance of the estimated means based on the proposed imputation method is investigated through some simulation studies and empirical analysis of the SIRD data.

    Release date: 2012-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 15-206-X2009026
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents estimates of intangible investment in Canada for the purpose of innovation, advertising and resource extraction. It first expands upon work by Beckstead and Gellatly (2003), Baldwin and Hanel (2003), Beckstead and Gellatly (2003), Beckstead and Vinodrai (2003) and Baldwin and Beckstead (2003) who argue that the scope of innovative activity extends beyond research and development (R&D) as defined by the Frascati Manual. It extends the definition of innovative activities to include all scientific and engineering expenditures - regardless of whether they are market-based or produced with a firm. The paper also considers expenditures on intangible items such as brands or resource exploration.

    The paper contributes to the existing literature by creating intangible investment estimates (science and engineering knowledge, advertising, mineral exploration by industry) using Statistics Canada's high quality and internally consistent databases. It produces estimates that accord with other intangibles studies (Corrado, Hulten and Sichel 2005, 2006; Jalava, Ahmavarra and Alanen 2007) and shows that traditional R&D type investment estimates account for about a quarter of intangible science and engineering investments.

    Release date: 2009-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110817
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Investment in research and development (R&D) is important to the economy of a country, and its measurement is an essential component of the Canadian statistical system. The publication, Gross Domestic Expenditures on Research and Development in Canada and the Provinces (GERD), 1997 to 2008 (Statistics Canada, 2008a) provides a statistical picture of the Canadian system of research and development. These data inform public policy, help benchmark Canadian performance against other countries (OECD, 2008 and 2007) and provide essential input to the study of the impact of science and technology on the life of Canadians.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110818
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) collects and reports on statistics from its member countries for various subject matter fields. In order to properly compare these statistics, the OE,CD develops common concepts and measurement standards. For the field of research and development (R&D) statistics, the OECD's proposed standard practice for R&D surveys is detailed in the Frascati Manual (OECD, 2002). However, not all OECD countries' national practices align with the Frascati Manual standards. The OECD receives Canadian R&D data from surveys conducted by Statistics Canada. While the general concepts of the Frascati Manual are integrated with Statistics Canada's survey framework, national variations in reporting with the OECD still exist. One of these national differences in data presentation can be found in the allocation of public general university funds.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210740
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article highlights expenditures and personnel devoted annually to scientific research and development (R&D) by Canadian private non-profit (PNP) organizations. These organizations play an important role in the Canadian R&D landscape: providing financial support to researchers in universities and other laboratories and performing their own research.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007007
    Description:

    Results from the Survey of Innovation 2003 raised some interesting questions. First, an unexpected one-third of establishments in R&D services were not innovative. According to the guidelines of the Oslo Manual, innovative establishments are those that introduced a new or significantly improved product or process on to the market or into production, within a specified interval. Second, many of these non-innovative establishments indicated that satisfying existing customers was irrelevant to their firms success. This was very different response from all other types of firms.

    This working paper provides a potential explanation of these unexpected results, as well as an overview of available information on establishments in R&D services (NAICS 5417) in the context of professional services generally. The paper assembles descriptive data to show that non-innovative establishments in R&D services differ significantly from other non-innovative establishments and, while not innovative, they are nevertheless highly inventive. It presents some evidence to suggest that they are venture firms (firms relying on infusions of investment capital rather than revenues from sales to sustain their operations) and proposes a specific set of indicators that would facilitate resolution of the nature of firms in this industry group.

    Release date: 2007-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210329
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The scientific research and development services industry is arousing growing interest among analysts and researchers. The interest aroused by this industry is due in part to its major contribution to total industrial expenditures on research and development (R&D) in Canada.

    Release date: 2007-10-09
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